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Jezebel
Jezebel
Jezebel
is described in the Book of Kings (1 Kings 16:31) as a queen who was the daughter of Ithobaal I of Sidon
Sidon
and the wife of Ahab, King of Israel.[2] According to the Books of Kings
Books of Kings
in the Hebrew Bible, Jezebel
Jezebel
incited her husband King Ahab
Ahab
to abandon the worship of Yahweh
Yahweh
and encourage worship of the deities Baal
Baal
and Asherah
Asherah
instead. Jezebel
Jezebel
persecuted the prophets of Yahweh, and fabricated evidence of blasphemy against an innocent landowner who refused to sell his property to King Ahab, causing the landowner to be put to death
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Polytheism
Polytheism
Polytheism
(from Greek πολυθεϊσμός, polytheismos) is the worship of or belief in multiple deities, which are usually assembled into a pantheon of gods and goddesses, along with their own religions and rituals. In most religions which accept polytheism, the different gods and goddesses are representations of forces of nature or ancestral principles, and can be viewed either as autonomous or as aspects or emanations of a creator deity or transcendental absolute principle (monistic theologies), which manifests immanently in nature (panentheistic and pantheistic theologies).[1] Most of the polytheistic deities of ancient religions, with the notable exceptions of the Ancient Egyptian[2] and Hindu deities, were conceived as having physical bodies. Polytheism
Polytheism
is a type of theism
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Kingdom Of Judah
The Kingdom of Judah
Kingdom of Judah
(Hebrew: מַמְלֶכֶת יְהוּדָה‬, Mamlekhet Yehudāh) was an Iron Age
Iron Age
kingdom of the Southern Levant. The Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible
Bible
depicts it as the successor to a United Monarchy, but historians are divided about the veracity of this account
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Frank Bernard Dicksee
Sir Francis Bernard Dicksee KCVO PRA ( London
London
27 November 1853 – 17 October 1928) was an English Victorian painter and illustrator, best known for his pictures of dramatic literary, historical, and legendary scenes. He also was a noted painter of portraits of fashionable women, which helped to bring him success in his own time.Contents1 Life 2 Gallery 3 Works 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit]The Two Crowns, 1900Dicksee's father, Thomas Dicksee, was a painter who taught Frank as well as his sister Margaret from a young age. Dicksee enrolled in the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
in 1870 and achieved early success
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Gustave Doré
Paul Gustave Louis Christophe Doré (/dɔːˈreɪ/; French: [ɡys.tav dɔ.ʁe]; 6 January 1832 – 23 January 1883) was a French artist, printmaker, illustrator, comics artist, caricaturist and sculptor who worked primarily with wood engraving.Contents1 Biography 2 Gallery 3 Works 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit]Doré by Carolus-Duran
Carolus-Duran
(1877)Doré was born in Strasbourg
Strasbourg
on 6 January 1832. By age five, he was a prodigy troublemaker, playing pranks that were mature beyond his years. Seven years later, he began carving in cement. At the age of fifteen Doré began his career working as a caricaturist for the French paper Le Journal pour rire,[1]. In the late 1840s and early 1850s he made several text comics, like Les Travaux d'Hercule (1847), Trois artistes incompris et mécontents (1851), Les Dés-agréments d'un voyage d'agrément (1851) and L'Histoire de la Sainte Russie (1854)
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Andrea Celesti
Andrea Celesti
Andrea Celesti
(1637–1712) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period, working in Venice. His style gravitated over the years from a turgid and academic weightiness to a lighter, looser brushstroke. Biography[edit] Celesti was born in Venice
Venice
and is buried in Toscolano. He first trained with Matteo Ponzoni, then with Sebastiano Mazzoni. During his early years (1659–1669) he worked in Venice, both in sundry labors for Doge's palace, and frescoes for the main salon of the Palazzo Erizzo. In 1676, he was painted doge Nicolò Sagredo’s portrait for the Sala dello Scrutinio in Ducal Palace. For the same site, in 1680, he painted canvases of Moses destroys the golden calf.[1] In 1681, he was awarded the title of Cavalieri by Doge Alvise Contarini. In 1684, he helped in the decoration of San Zaccaria
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Tyre, Lebanon
Tyre (Arabic: صور‎, Ṣūr; Phoenician: 𐤑𐤓‬, Ṣur; Hebrew: צוֹר‬, Tsor; Tiberian Hebrew
Tiberian Hebrew
צֹר‬, Ṣōr; Akkadian: 𒀫𒊒, Ṣurru; Greek: Τύρος, Týros; Turkish: Sur; Latin: Tyrus, Armenian: Տիր, Tir), sometimes romanized as Sour, is a district capital in the South Governorate
South Governorate
of Lebanon. There were approximately 117,000 inhabitants in 2003.[1] However, the government of Lebanon
Lebanon
has released only rough estimates of population numbers since 1932, so an accurate statistical accounting is not possible.[2] Tyre juts out from the coast of the Mediterranean and is located about 80 km (50 mi) south of Beirut. The name of the city means "rock"[3] after the rocky formation on which the town was originally built
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Josephus
Titus
Titus
Flavius Josephus
Josephus
(/dʒoʊˈsiːfəs/;[1] Greek: Φλάβιος Ἰώσηπος; 37 – c. 100),[2][page needed] born Yosef ben Matityahu (Hebrew: יוסף הכהן בן מתתיהו‬, Yosef ben Matityahu; Greek: Ἰώσηπος Ματθίου παῖς),[3][4] was a first-century Romano-Jewish scholar, historian and hagiographer, who was born in Jerusalem—then part of Roman Judea—to a father of priestly descent and a mother who claimed royal ancestry. He initially fought against the Romans during the First Jewish–Roman War as head of Jewish forces in Galilee, until surrendering in 67 CE to Roman forces led by Vespasian
Vespasian
after the six-week siege of Jotapata. Josephus
Josephus
claimed the Jewish Messianic prophecies that initiated the First Roman-Jewish War made reference to Vespasian
Vespasian
becoming Emperor of Rome
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Dido
Dido
Dido
(/ˈdaɪdoʊ/ DY-doh; Greek: Δῑδώ, Latin pronunciation: [ˈdiːdoː]) was, according to ancient Greek and Roman sources, the founder and first queen of Carthage. She is primarily known from the account given by the Roman poet Virgil
Virgil
in his epic, Aeneid. In some sources she is also known as Elissa (/iːˈlɪsə/ ee-LISS-ə).[1]Contents1 Early accounts 2 Questions of historicity and dating 3 Virgil's Aeneid 4 Later Roman tradition 5 Continuing tradition 6 See also 7 Notes 8 Selected bibliography 9 Primary sources 10 External linksEarly accounts[edit]Aeneid, Book IV, Death of Dido. From the Vergilius Vaticanus
Vergilius Vaticanus
(Vatican Library, Cod. Vat. lat
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Carthage
Carthage
Carthage
(/ˈkɑːrθɪdʒ/, from Latin: Carthago; Phoenician: Qart-ḥadašt ("New city")) was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis
Tunis
in what is now the Tunis Governorate
Tunis Governorate
in Tunisia. The city developed from a Phoenician colony into the capital of an empire dominating the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC.[1] The legendary Queen Dido
Dido
is regarded as the founder of the city, though her historicity has been questioned. According to accounts by Timaeus of Tauromenium, she purchased from a local tribe the amount of land that could be covered by an oxhide
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Omri
The Order of Merit of the Italian Republic
Order of Merit of the Italian Republic
(Italian: Ordine al merito della Repubblica Italiana) was founded as the senior order of knighthood by the second President of the Italian Republic, Luigi Einaudi in 1951.[1] The highest ranking honour of the Republic, it is awarded for "merit acquired by the nation" in the fields of literature, the arts, economy, public service, and social, philanthropic and humanitarian activities and for long and conspicuous service in civilian and military careers
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Stray Dogs
A free-ranging dog is a dog that is not contained. Free-ranging dogs include wild dogs, feral dogs, stray dogs, street dogs, and village dogs, as well as dogs allowed to come and go freely by their owners. The term is used when distinctions of ownership are irrelevant. It sometimes overlaps with the polysemic term pariah dog
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Mesha Stele
The Mesha
Mesha
Stele
Stele
(also known as the "Moabite Stone") is a stele (inscribed stone) set up around 840 BCE by King Mesha
Mesha
of Moab
Moab
(a kingdom located in modern Jordan)
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Black Obelisk Of Shalmaneser III
The Black Obelisk
Obelisk
of Shalmaneser III is a black limestone Assyrian sculpture with many scenes in bas-relief and inscriptions. It comes from Nimrud
Nimrud
(ancient Kalhu), in northern Iraq, and commemorates the deeds of King Shalmaneser III (reigned 858-824 BC). It is on display at the British Museum
British Museum
in London, and several other museums have cast replicas. It is the most complete Assyrian obelisk yet discovered, and is historically significant because it is thought to display the earliest ancient depiction of a biblical figure - Jehu, King of Israel
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Asimov's Guide To The Bible
Asimov's Guide to the Bible is a work by Isaac Asimov that was first published in two volumes in 1967 and 1969, covering the Old Testament and the New Testament (including the Catholic Old Testament, or deuterocanonical, books (See Catholic Bible) and the Eastern Orthodox Old Testament books, or anagignoskomena, along with the Fourth Book of Ezra), respectively. He combined them into a single 1296-page volume in 1981. They included maps by the artist Rafael Palacios. Including numerous black-and-white maps, the guide goes through the books of the Bible in the order of the King James Version to the extent possible, explaining the historical and geographical setting of each one, and the political and historical influences that affected it, as well as biographical information about the main characters
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Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov
(/ˈæzɪmɒv/;[b][c] c. January 2, 1920[a] – April 6, 1992) was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston
Boston
University. He was known for his works of science fiction and popular science. Asimov was a prolific writer who wrote or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards.[d] His books have been published in 9 of the 10 major categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification.[1] Asimov wrote hard science fiction. Along with Robert A. Heinlein
Robert A. Heinlein
and Arthur C. Clarke, Asimov was considered one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers during his lifetime.[2] Asimov's most famous work is the "Foundation" series;[3] his other major series are the "Galactic Empire" series and the Robot
Robot
series
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