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Jewish Peoplehood
JEWISH PEOPLEHOOD ( Hebrew
Hebrew
: עמיות יהודית, Amiut Yehudit) is the conception of the awareness of the underlying unity that makes an individual a part of the Jewish
Jewish
people. The concept of peoplehood has a double meaning. The first is descriptive, as a concept factually describing the existence of the Jews
Jews
as a people. The second is normative, as a value that describes the feeling of belonging and commitment to the Jewish
Jewish
people. Some believe that the concept of Jewish
Jewish
peoplehood is a paradigm shift in Jewish
Jewish
life
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Brit Milah
The BRIT MILAH (Hebrew : בְּרִית מִילָה‎, pronounced ; Ashkenazi pronunciation: , "covenant of circumcision "; Yiddish pronunciation: bris ) is a Jewish religious male circumcision ceremony performed by a mohel ("circumciser") on the eighth day of a male infant's life. The brit milah is followed by a celebratory meal (seudat mitzvah )
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Zohar
The ZOHAR ( Hebrew
Hebrew
: זֹהַר‬, lit. "Splendor" or "Radiance") is the foundational work in the literature of Jewish mystical thought known as Kabbalah
Kabbalah
. It is a group of books including commentary on the mystical aspects of the Torah
Torah
(the five books of Moses
Moses
) and scriptural interpretations as well as material on mysticism , mythical cosmogony , and mystical psychology . The Zohar
Zohar
contains discussions of the nature of God
God
, the origin and structure of the universe, the nature of souls, redemption, the relationship of Ego to Darkness and "true self" to "The Light of God", and the relationship between the "universal energy" and man. Its scriptural exegesis can be considered an esoteric form of the Rabbinic literature known as Midrash
Midrash
, which elaborates on the Torah
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Midrash
In Judaism
Judaism
, the MIDRASH (/ˈmɪdrɑːʃ/ ; Hebrew : מִדְרָשׁ‎; pl. מִדְרָשִׁים midrashim) is the genre of rabbinic literature which contains early interpretations and commentaries on the Written Torah and Oral Torah (spoken law and sermons), as well as non-legalistic rabbinic literature (aggadah ) and occasionally the Jewish religious laws (halakha ), which usually form a running commentary on specific passages in the Hebrew Scripture ( Tanakh ). The Midrash, capitalized, refers to a specific compilation of these writings, primarily from the first ten centuries CE . The purpose of midrash was to resolve problems in the interpretation of difficult passages of the text of the Hebrew Bible, using Rabbinic principles of hermeneutics and philology to align them with the religious and ethical values of religious teachers
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Tzedakah
TZEDAKAH or Ṣ\'DAQAH in Classical Hebrew (Hebrew : צדקה‎; Arabic : صدقة‎‎), is a Hebrew word literally meaning justice or righteousness but commonly used to signify charity , though it is a different concept from charity because tzedakah is an obligation and charity is typically understood as a spontaneous act of goodwill and a marker of generosity. It is based on the Hebrew word (צדק, Tzedek ) meaning righteousness , fairness or justice , and it is related to the Hebrew word Tzadik meaning righteous as an adjective (or righteous individual as a noun in the form of a substantive ). In Judaism
Judaism
, tzedakah refers to the religious obligation to do what is right and just, which Judaism
Judaism
emphasises are important parts of living a spiritual life
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Jewish Prayer
JEWISH PRAYER (Hebrew : תְּפִלָּה‎, tefillah ; plural Hebrew : תְּפִלּוֹת‎, tefillot ; Yiddish
Yiddish
תּפֿלה tfile , plural תּפֿלות tfilles ; Yinglish : DAVENING /ˈdɑːvənɪŋ/ from Yiddish
Yiddish
דאַוון daven ‘pray’) are the prayer recitations and Jewish meditation traditions that form part of the observance of Rabbinic Judaism
Judaism
. These prayers, often with instructions and commentary, are found in the siddur , the traditional Jewish prayer
Jewish prayer
book. However, if the Talmud
Talmud
mentions tefillah, it refers to the Shemoneh Esreh only. Prayer—as a "service of the heart"—is in principle a Torah-based commandment . It is not time-dependent and is mandatory for both Jewish men and women. You shall serve God with your whole heart
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Jewish Views On Marriage
In traditional Judaism
Judaism
, marriage is viewed as a contractual bond commanded by God in which a man and a woman come together to create a relationship in which God is directly involved. (Deut. 24:1) Though procreation is not the sole purpose, a Jewish marriage is traditionally expected to fulfill the commandment to have children. (Gen. 1:28) In this view, marriage is understood to mean that the husband and wife are merging into a single soul, which is why a man is considered "incomplete" if he is not married, as his soul is only one part of a larger whole that remains to be unified. However, some Jewish denominations such as Reconstructionist, Reform and Conservative Judaism
Judaism
recognize same-sex marriage and deemphasize procreation, focusing on marriage as a bond between a couple
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Bereavement In Judaism
BEREAVEMENT IN JUDAISM ( Hebrew
Hebrew
: אֲבֵלוּת, avelut; mourning) is a combination of minhag and mitzvah derived from Judaism
Judaism
's classical Torah
Torah
and rabbinic texts. The details of observance and practice vary according to each Jewish community
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Mishneh Torah
The MISHNEH TORAH (Hebrew : מִשְׁנֵה תּוֹרָה‎‎, "Repetition of the Torah"), subtitled SEFER YAD HA-HAZAKA (ספר יד החזקה "Book of the Strong Hand"), is a code of Jewish religious law ( Halakha ) authored by Maimonides
Maimonides
( Rabbi
Rabbi
Moshe ben Maimon, also known as RaMBaM or "Rambam"), one of history's foremost rabbis. The Mishneh Torah
Torah
was compiled between 1170 and 1180 (4930–4940), while Maimonides
Maimonides
was living in Egypt
Egypt
, and is regarded as Maimonides' magnum opus . Accordingly, later sources simply refer to the work as "Maimon", "Maimonides" or "RaMBaM", although Maimonides
Maimonides
composed other works. Mishneh Torah
Torah
consists of fourteen books, subdivided into sections, chapters, and paragraphs
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Outline Of Judaism
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Judaism
Judaism
: CONTENTS* 1 History of Judaism
Judaism
* 1.1 Pre-monarchic period * 1.2 Monarchic period * 1.2.1 United monarchy * 1.2.2 Divided monarchy * 1.2.2.1
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Kabbalah
KABBALAH (Hebrew : קַבָּלָה‬, literally "parallel/corresponding," or "received tradition" ) is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought that originated in Judaism. A traditional Kabbalist in Judaism is called a Mekubbal (מְקוּבָּל‬). Kabbalah's definition varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it, from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later Christian , New Age , and Occultist/western esoteric syncretic adaptations. Kabbalah
Kabbalah
is a set of esoteric teachings meant to explain the relationship between an unchanging, eternal, and mysterious Ein Sof (infinity) and the mortal and finite universe (God's creation). While it is heavily used by some denominations, it is not a religious denomination in itself. It forms the foundations of mystical religious interpretation
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Tanakh
Outline of Bible-related topics Bible
Bible
book Bible
Bible
portal * v * t * e The TANAKH (/tɑːˈnɑːx/ ; Hebrew : תַּנַ"ךְ‎, pronounced or ; also Tenakh, Tenak, Tanach), also called the Mikra or Hebrew Bible
Bible
, is the canonical collection of Jewish texts, which is also a textual source for the Christian Old Testament
Old Testament
. These texts are composed mainly in Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew
, with some passages in Biblical Aramaic (in the books of Daniel , Ezra and a few others). The traditional Hebrew text is known as the Masoretic Text . The Tanakh consists of twenty-four books
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Shulchan Aruch
The SHULCHAN ARUCH (Hebrew : שֻׁלְחָן עָרוּך‎ , literally: "Set Table"), also known by various Jewish communities but not all as "the CODE OF JEWISH LAW," is the most widely consulted of the various legal codes in Judaism. It was authored in Safed (today in Israel
Israel
) by Yosef Karo in 1563 and published in Venice
Venice
two years later. Together with its commentaries, it is the most widely accepted compilation of Jewish law ever written. The halachic rulings in the Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
generally follow Sephardic law and customs , whereas Ashkenazi Jews
Ashkenazi Jews
will generally follow the halachic rulings of Moses Isserles , whose glosses to the Shulchan Aruch note where the Sephardic and Ashkenazi customs differ
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Jewish Holidays
JEWISH HOLIDAYS, also known as JEWISH FESTIVALS or YAMIM TOVIM (ימים טובים, "Good Days", or singular יום טוב YOM TOV, in transliterated Hebrew ), are holidays observed in Judaism
Judaism
and by Jews
Jews
throughout the Hebrew calendar
Hebrew calendar
and include religious, cultural and national elements, derived from three sources: Biblical mitzvot ("commandments"); rabbinic mandates ; Jewish history and the history of the State of Israel
Israel
. Jewish holidays
Jewish holidays
occur on the same dates every year in the Hebrew calendar, but the dates vary in the Gregorian . This is because the Hebrew calendar
Hebrew calendar
is a lunisolar calendar (i.e., based on the cycles of both the sun and moon), whereas the Gregorian is a solar calendar
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Shabbat
SHABBAT (/ʃəˈbɑːt/ ; Hebrew : שַׁבָּת‎ , "rest" or "cessation") or SHABBOS ( , Yiddish : שבת‎) or the SABBATH is Judaism
Judaism
's day of rest and seventh day of the week , on which religious Jews, Samaritans and certain Christians (such as Seventh-day Adventists and Seventh Day Baptists) remember the Biblical creation of the heavens and the earth in six days and the Exodus of the Hebrews, and look forward to a future Messianic Age . Shabbat
Shabbat
observance entails refraining from work activities , often with great rigor , and engaging in restful activities to honor the day. Judaism's traditional position is that unbroken seventh-day Shabbat
Shabbat
originated among the Jewish people, as their first and most sacred institution, though some suggest other origins
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Mishnah
—— Tannaitic —— * Mishnah * Tosefta
Tosefta
—— Amoraic ( Gemara
Gemara
) —— *
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