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Jetavanaramaya
Coordinates: 8°21′06″N 80°24′13″E / 8.35167°N 80.40361°E / 8.35167; 80.40361JetavanaramayaජේතවනාරාමයJetavanaramayaFormer names Denanaka and DenaveheraGeneral informationType TempleLocation Anuradhapura,North Central Province, Sri LankaHeight 122 m (400 ft)DimensionsOther dimensions 233,000 m2 (2,508,000 sq ft)Technical detailsFloor area 5.6 HectaresThe Jetavanaramaya
Jetavanaramaya
(world's tallest stupa) is a stupa located in the ruins of Jetavana
Jetavana
in the sacred world heritage city of Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Glue
Adhesives, also known as glue, cement, mucilage, or paste,[1] is any substance applied to one surface, or both surfaces, of two separate items that binds them together and resists their separation.[2] Adjectives may be used in conjunction with the word "adhesive" to describe properties based on the substance's physical or chemical form, the type of materials joined, or conditions under which it is applied.[3] The use of adhesives offers many advantages over binding techniques such as sewing, mechanical fastening, thermal bonding, etc. These include the ability to bind different materials together, to distribute stress more efficiently across the joint, the cost effectiveness of an easily mechanized process, an improvement in aesthetic design, and increased design flexibility
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Clay
Clay
Clay
is a finely-grained natural rock or soil material that combines one or more clay minerals with possible traces of quartz (SiO4), metal oxides (Al2O3 , MgO etc.) and organic matter. Geologic clay deposits are mostly composed of phyllosilicate minerals containing variable amounts of water trapped in the mineral structure. Clays are plastic due to particle size and geometry as well as water content, and become hard, brittle and non–plastic upon drying or firing.[1][2][3] Depending on the soil's content in which it is found, clay can appear in various colours from white to dull grey or brown to deep orange-red.Electron microscope photograph of smectite clay – magnification 23,500Although many naturally occurring deposits include both silts and clay, clays are distinguished from other fine-grained soils by differences in size and mineralogy
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Dolomite
Dolomite
Dolomite
( /ˈdɒləmaɪt/) is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate, ideally CaMg(CO3)2. The term is also used for a sedimentary carbonate rock composed mostly of the mineral dolomite. An alternative name sometimes used for the dolomitic rock type is dolostone.Contents1 History 2 Properties 3 Formation 4 Uses 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Most probably the mineral dolomite was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1768.[6] In 1791, it was described as a rock by the French naturalist and geologist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu
Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu
(1750–1801), first in buildings of the old city of Rome, and later as samples collected in the mountains now known as the Dolomite Alps
Dolomite Alps
of northern Italy
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Sieve
A sieve, or sifter, is a device for separating wanted elements from unwanted material or for characterizing the particle size distribution of a sample, typically using a woven screen such as a mesh or net or metal.[1] The word "sift" derives from "sieve". In cooking, a sifter is used to separate and break up clumps in dry ingredients such as flour, as well as to aerate and combine them. A strainer is a form of sieve used to separate solids from liquid.Contents1 Industrial strainer 2 Sieving 3 Wooden sieves 4 US standard test sieve series 5 Other types of sieves 6 See also 7 ReferencesIndustrial strainer[edit] Some industrial strainers available are simplex basket strainers, duplex basket strainers, and Y strainers. Simple basket strainers are used to protect valuable or sensitive equipment in systems that are meant to be shut down temporarily. Some commonly used strainers are bell mouth strainers, foot valve strainers,[2] basket strainers
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Slurry
A slurry is a thin sloppy mud or cement or, in extended use, any fluid mixture of a pulverized solid with a liquid (usually water), often used as a convenient way of handling solids in bulk.[1] Slurries behave in some ways like thick fluids, flowing under gravity and are also capable of being pumped if not too thick.Contents1 Examples 2 Calculations2.1 Determining solids fraction 2.2 Liquid mass from mass fraction of solids 2.3 Volumetric fraction from mass fraction3 See also 4 References 5 External linksExamples[edit] Examples of slurries include: Cement
Cement

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Lime Plaster
Lime plaster
Lime plaster
is a type of plaster composed of sand, water, and lime, usually non-hydraulic hydrated lime (also known as slaked lime, high calcium lime or air lime). Ancient lime plaster often contained horse hair for reinforcement and pozzolan additives to reduce the working time. Traditional non-hydraulic hydrated lime only sets through carbonatation when the plaster is kept moist and access of CO2 from the air is possible. It will not set when submersed in water. When a very thick layer or several layers are applied, the lime can remain soft for weeks. The curing time of lime plaster can be shortened by using (natural) hydraulic lime or adding pozzolan additives, transforming it into artificially hydraulic lime. In ancient times, Roman lime plaster incorporated pozzolanic volcanic ash; in modern times, fly ash is preferred
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Seashells
A seashell or sea shell, also known simply as a shell, is a hard, protective outer layer created by an animal that lives in the sea. The shell is part of the body of the animal. Empty seashells are often found washed up on beaches by beachcombers. The shells are empty because the animal has died and the soft parts have been eaten by another animal or have rotted out. The term seashell usually refers to the exoskeleton of an invertebrate (an animal without a backbone), and is typically composed of calcium carbonate or chitin. Most shells that are found on beaches are the shells of marine mollusks, partly because these shells are usually made of calcium carbonate, and endure better than shells made of chitin. Apart from mollusk shells, other shells that can be found on beaches are those of barnacles, horseshoe crabs and brachiopods
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Sugar Syrup
In cooking, a syrup or sirup (from Arabic: شراب‎; sharāb, beverage, wine and Latin: sirupus)[1] is a condiment that is a thick, viscous liquid consisting primarily of a solution of sugar in water, containing a large amount of dissolved sugars but showing little tendency to deposit crystals. Its consistency is similar to that of molasses. The viscosity arises from the multiple hydrogen bonds between the dissolved sugar, which has many hydroxyl (OH) groups, and the water. Syrups can be made by dissolving sugar in water or by reducing naturally sweet juices such as cane juice, sorghum juice, or maple sap
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Egg Whites
Egg
Egg
white is the clear liquid (also called the albumen or the glair/glaire) contained within an egg. In chickens it is formed from the layers of secretions of the anterior section of the hen's oviduct during the passage of the egg.[1] It forms around fertilized or unfertilized egg yolks. The primary natural purpose of egg white is to protect the yolk and provide additional nutrition for the growth of the embryo (when fertilized). Egg
Egg
white consists primarily of about 90% water into which is dissolved about 10% proteins (including albumins, mucoproteins, and globulins). Unlike the yolk, which is high in lipids (fats), egg white contains almost no fat, and carbohydrate content is less than 1%. Egg
Egg
whites contain about 56% of the protein in the egg. Egg
Egg
white has many uses in food (e.g. meringue, mousse) and also many other uses (e.g
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Coconut Water
Coconut
Coconut
water is the clear liquid inside coconuts (which are fruits of the coconut palm). In early development, it serves as a suspension for the endosperm of the coconut during the nuclear phase of development. As growth continues, the endosperm matures into its cellular phase and deposits into the rind of the coconut pulp.[1]Contents1 Harvesting 2 Human consumption and derivative products 3 Nutritional value 4 Commercialization 5 Medical use5.1 Folk medicine6 Risks 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHarvesting[edit] Fresh coconuts are typically harvested from the tree while they are green. A hole may be bored into the coconut to provide access to the liquid and meat. In young coconuts, the liquid and air may be under some pressure and may spray slightly when the inner husk is first penetrated
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Resin
In polymer chemistry and materials science, resin is a "solid or highly viscous substance" of plant or synthetic origin that is typically convertible into polymers.[1] They are often mixtures of organic compounds, principally terpenes. Many plants, particularly woody plants, produce resin in response to injury. The resin acts as a bandage protecting the plant from invading insects and pathogens.[2]Contents1 Examples of natural resins and related materials1.1 Resins1.1.1 Fossil
Fossil
resins1.2 Rosin 1.3 Petroleum- and insect-derived resins2 History and etymology2.1 Non-resinous exudates3 Uses3.1 Plant
Plant
resins 3.2 Synthetic resins4 See also 5 References 6 External linksExamples of natural resins and related materials[edit] Plants secrete resins and rosins for their protective benefits
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Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
(Sinhalese: අනුරාධපුරය; Tamil: அனுராதபுரம்) is a major city in Sri Lanka. It is the capital city of North Central Province, Sri Lanka
North Central Province, Sri Lanka
and the capital of Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
District. Anuradhapura
Anuradhapura
is one of the ancient capitals of Sri Lanka, famous for its well-preserved ruins of an ancient Sri Lankan civilization. It was the third capital of the Kingdom of Rajarata, following the kingdoms of Tambapanni and Upatissa Nuwara. The city, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, was the centre of Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism
Buddhism
for many centuries. The city lies 205 km (127 mi) north of the current capital Colombo
Colombo
in the North Central Province, on the banks of the historic Malvathu Oya
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Pebble
A pebble is a clast of rock with a particle size of 2 to 64 millimetres based on the Krumbein phi scale of sedimentology. Pebbles are generally considered larger than granules (2 to 4 millimetres diameter) and smaller than cobbles (64 to 256 millimetres diameter). A rock made predominantly of pebbles is termed a conglomerate. Pebble
Pebble
tools are among the earliest known man-made artifacts, dating from the Palaeolithic
Palaeolithic
period of human history. A beach composed chiefly of surface pebbles is commonly termed a shingle beach
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Copper
Copper
Copper
is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a reddish-orange color. Copper
Copper
is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper
Copper
is one of the few metals that occur in nature in directly usable metallic form (native metals) as opposed to needing extraction from an ore. This led to very early human use, from c. 8000 BC. It was the first metal to be smelted from its ore, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c
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