HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Jerboas
10 genera in 5 subfamiliesThe jerboa (from Arabic: جربوع‎ jarbūʻ ) forms the bulk of the membership of the family Dipodidae. Jerboas are hopping desert rodents found throughout Northern Africa
Northern Africa
and Asia
Asia
east to northern China
China
and Manchuria.[1] They tend to live in hot deserts.[1] When chased, jerboas can run at up to 24 kilometres per hour[1] (about 15 mph). Some species are preyed on by little owls (Athene noctua) in central Asia. Most species of jerboa have excellent hearing that they use to avoid becoming the prey of nocturnal predators. The typical lifespan of a jerboa is around six years.[2]Contents1 Anatomy and body features 2 Behavior 3 Diet 4 Communication and perception 5 Reproduction 6 Classification 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksAnatomy and body features[edit] Jerboas look somewhat like miniature kangaroos, as they have many similarities
[...More...]

"Jerboas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Miocene
The Miocene
Miocene
( /ˈmaɪəˌsiːn/[2][3]) is the first geological epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period and extends from about 23.03 to 5.333 million years ago (Ma). The Miocene
Miocene
was named by Charles Lyell; its name comes from the Greek words μείων (meiōn, “less”) and καινός (kainos, “new”)[4] and means "less recent" because it has 18% fewer modern sea invertebrates than the Pliocene. The Miocene follows the Oligocene
Oligocene
and is followed by the Pliocene. As the earth went from the Oligocene
Oligocene
through the Miocene
Miocene
and into the Pliocene, the climate slowly cooled towards a series of ice ages
[...More...]

"Miocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asia
Metropolitan areas of Asia List of cities in AsiaList Bangkok Beijing Busan Chittagong Delhi Dhaka Doha Dubai Guangzhou Hanoi Ho Chi Minh Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Karachi Kuala Lumpur Manila Mumbai Osaka Pyongyang Riyadh Shanghai Shenzhen Singapore Seoul Taipei[4] Tehran Tokyo Ulaanbaatar Asia
Asia
(/ˈeɪʒə, ˈeɪʃə/ ( listen)) is Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres. It shares the continental landmass of Eurasia with the continent of Europe
Europe
and the continental landmass of Afro- Eurasia
Eurasia
with both Europe
Europe
and Africa
[...More...]

"Asia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cardiocraniinae
Cardiocraniinae
Cardiocraniinae
is a subfamily of rodents in the family Dipodidae, named by the Russian zoologist Boris Stepanovich Vinogradov (1891–1958) in 1925. These jumping rodents are small mammals, less than 20 cm long. Taxonomy[edit]Genus CardiocraniusFive-toed pygmy jerboa, Cardiocranius
Cardiocranius
paradoxusGenus SalpingotulusBaluchistan pygmy jerboa, Salpingotulus
Salpingotulus
michaelisGenus Salpingotus, pygmy jerboasSubgenus AnguistodontusThick-tailed pygmy jerboa, Salpingotus crassicaudaSubgenus ProsalpingotusHeptner's pygmy jerboa, Salpingotus heptneri Pale pygmy jerboa, Salpingotus pallidus Thomas's pygmy jerboa, Salpingotus thomasiSubgenus SalpingotusKozlov's pygmy jerboa, Salpingotus kozloviReferences[edit]Holden, M.E.; Musser, G.G. (2005). "Subfamily Cardiocraniinae". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M
[...More...]

"Cardiocraniinae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polygyny
Polygyny
Polygyny
(/pəˈlɪdʒɪniː/; from Neoclassical Greek πολυγυνία from πολύ- poly- "many", and γυνή gyne "woman" or "wife"[1]) is the most common and accepted form of polygamy, entailing the marriage of a man with several women. Most countries that permit polygamy are Muslim-majority countries
Muslim-majority countries
in which polygyny is the only form permitted. Polyandry
Polyandry
is illegal in virtually every state of the world. In some countries where polygamy is illegal, and sometimes even when legal, at times it is known for men to have one or more mistresses, whom they do not marry
[...More...]

"Polygyny" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gerbil
Ammodillus Brachiones Desmodilliscus Desmodillus Dipodillus Gerbilliscus Gerbillurus Gerbillus Meriones Microdillus Pachyuromys Psammomys Rhombomys Sekeetamys Tatera TaterillusA young gerbil sitting by the food bowl to eatA mother gerbil sitting with four young gerbilsA gerbil is a small mammal of the subfamily Gerbillinae in the order Rodentia. Once known as desert rats, the gerbil subfamily includes about 110 species of African, Indian, and Asian rodents, including sand rats and jirds, all of which are adapted to arid habitats. Most are primarily active during the day, making them diurnal[1] (but some species, including the common household pet, exhibit crepuscular behavior), and almost all are omnivorous. Gerbils are related to mice and rats; they all belong to the family Muridae. One Mongolian species, Meriones unguiculatus, also known as the clawed jird, is a gentle and hardy animal that has become a popular small house pet
[...More...]

"Gerbil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rainy Season
The rainy season, or monsoon season, is the time of year when most of a region's average annual rainfall occurs. It usually lasts one or more months.[1] The term "green season" is also sometimes used as a euphemism by tourist authorities.[2] Areas with wet seasons are dispersed across portions of the tropics and subtropics.[3] Under the Köppen climate classification, for tropical climates, a wet season month is defined as a month where average precipitation is 60 millimetres (2.4 in) or more.[4] In contrast to areas with savanna climates and monsoon regimes, Mediterranean
Mediterranean
climates have wet winters and dry summers
[...More...]

"Rainy Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cryptic Colouration
Camouflage
Camouflage
is the use of any combination of materials, coloration, or illumination for concealment, either by making animals or objects hard to see (crypsis), or by disguising them as something else (mimesis). Examples include the leopard's spotted coat, the battledress of a modern soldier, and the leaf-mimic katydid's wings. A third approach, motion dazzle, confuses the observer with a conspicuous pattern, making the object visible but momentarily harder to locate. The majority of camouflage methods aim for crypsis, often through a general resemblance to the background, high contrast disruptive coloration, eliminating shadow, and countershading. In the open ocean, where there is no background, the principal methods of camouflage are transparency, silvering, and countershading, while the ability to produce light is among other things used for counter-illumination on the undersides of cephalopods such as squid
[...More...]

"Cryptic Colouration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Foramen Magnum
The foramen magnum (Latin: great hole) is a large oval opening (foramen) in the occipital bone of the skull in humans and various other animals. It is one of the several oval or circular openings (foramina) in the base of the skull. The spinal cord, an extension of the medulla, passes through the foramen magnum as it exits the cranial cavity. Apart from the transmission of the medulla oblongata and its membranes, the foramen magnum transmits the vertebral arteries, the anterior and posterior spinal arteries, the tectorial membranes and alar ligaments. It also transmits the spinal component of the accessory nerve into the skull. The opisthion is the midpoint on the posterior margin of the foramen magnum and is a cephalometric landmark. Another landmark is the basion located at the midpoint on the anterior margin of the foramen magnum. The foramen magnum is a very important feature in bipedal mammals
[...More...]

"Foramen Magnum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bipedalism
Bipedalism
Bipedalism
is a form of terrestrial locomotion where an organism moves by means of its two rear limbs or legs. An animal or machine that usually moves in a bipedal manner is known as a biped /ˈbaɪpɛd/, meaning "two feet" (from the Latin
Latin
bis for "double" and pes for "foot"). Types of bipedal movement include walking, running, or hopping. Few modern species are habitual bipeds whose normal method of locomotion is two-legged. Within mammals, habitual bipedalism has evolved multiple times, with the macropods, kangaroo rats and mice, springhare,[4] hopping mice, pangolins and homininan apes (australopithecines and humans) well as various other extinct groups evolving the trait independently
[...More...]

"Bipedalism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kangaroo
4 species, see text.The kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae
Macropodidae
(macropods, meaning "large foot"). In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, especially those of the genus Macropus: the red kangaroo, antilopine kangaroo, eastern grey kangaroo, and western grey kangaroo.[1] Kangaroos are indigenous to Australia. The Australian government estimates that 34.3 million kangaroos lived within the commercial harvest areas of Australia
Australia
in 2011, up from 25.1 million one year earlier.[2] As with the terms "wallaroo" and "wallaby", "kangaroo" refers to a polyphyletic grouping of species. All three refer to members of the same taxonomic family, Macropodidae, and are distinguished according to size. The largest species in the family are called "kangaroos" and the smallest are generally called "wallabies"
[...More...]

"Kangaroo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Little Owl
Carine noctuaThe little owl (Athene noctua) is a bird that inhabits much of the temperate and warmer parts of Europe, Asia
Asia
east to Korea, and north Africa. It was introduced into Britain at the end of the nineteenth century and into the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand
New Zealand
in the early twentieth century. This owl is a member of the typical or true owl family, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl, the other grouping being the barn owls, Tytonidae. It is a small, cryptically coloured, mainly nocturnal species and is found in a range of habitats including farmland, woodland fringes, steppes and semi-deserts. It feeds on insects, earthworms, other invertebrates and small vertebrates. Males hold territories which they defend against intruders. This owl is a cavity nester and a clutch of about four eggs is laid in spring
[...More...]

"Little Owl" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Manchuria
Manchuria
Manchuria
(simplified Chinese: 满洲; traditional Chinese: 滿洲; pinyin: Mǎnzhōu) was a name first used in the 17th century by Chinese people to refer to a large geographic region in Northeast Asia. Depending on the context, Manchuria
Manchuria
can either refer to a region that falls entirely within the People's Republic of China[1][2][3] or a larger region divided between China
China
and Russia
[...More...]

"Manchuria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
[...More...]

"China" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dust Bathing
Dust bathing
Dust bathing
(also called sand bathing) is an animal behavior characterized by rolling or moving around in dust, dry earth or sand, with the likely purpose of removing parasites from fur, feathers or skin.[1] Dust bathing
Dust bathing
is a maintenance behavior performed by a wide range of mammalian and avian species
[...More...]

"Dust Bathing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Northern Africa
North Africa
Africa
is a collective term for a group of Mediterranean countries and territories situated in the northern-most region of the African continent. The term "North Africa" has no single accepted definition. It is sometimes defined as stretching from the Atlantic shores of Morocco
Morocco
in the west, to the Suez Canal
Suez Canal
and the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east. Others have limited it to the countries of Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, a region known by the French during colonial times as “Afrique du Nord” and by the Arabs
Arabs
as the Maghreb
Maghreb
(“West”). The most commonly accepted definition includes Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, as well as Libya
Libya
and Egypt
[...More...]

"Northern Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.