HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Jeju-do
Jeju Island
Island
(Hangul: 제주도, Korean pronunciation: [tɕe.dʑu.do] Jejudo; previously Cheju-do) is the largest island off the coast of the Korean Peninsula, and the main island of Jeju Province
Jeju Province
of South Korea. The island lies in the Korea Strait, south of South Jeolla Province. The island contains the natural World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
Jeju Volcanic Island
Island
and Lava Tubes.[1] Jejudo has a moderate climate; even in winter, the temperature rarely falls below 0 °C (32 °F)
[...More...]

"Jeju-do" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jebudo
Jebudo
Jebudo
is an island in South Korea, located in Jebu-ri, Seosin-myeon, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do. It is connected to Songgyo-ri, Seosin-myeon, Hwaseong-si, Keonggi-do by a two-lane road, but it is impassable twice a day for three to four hours, due to the high tide. " Jebudo
Jebudo
Beach" which is located in southern Jebudo
Jebudo
is renowned as a summer vacation destination. It is also popular among tourists as it is close to Seoul
Seoul
and Incheon. Geography[edit] Jebudo
Jebudo
roughly forms an inverted triangle and the edge of the southwest coast stretches away into the sea like the tail of swallow. The relatively flat coastline contains many large mud flats. While the mainland is dominated by agricultural activities, the coastline has been mainly developed for tourism. There island sports two mountains: "Mt
[...More...]

"Jebudo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wetland
A wetland is a land area that is saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, such that it takes on the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem.[2] The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the characteristic vegetation of aquatic plants,[3][4] adapted to the unique hydric soil. Wetlands play a number of roles in the environment, principally water purification, flood control, carbon sink and shoreline stability. Wetlands are also considered the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems, serving as home to a wide range of plant and animal life. Wetlands occur naturally on every continent except Antarctica,[5] the largest includes the Amazon River
[...More...]

"Wetland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anticommunist
Anti-communism
Anti-communism
is opposition to communism. Organized anti-communism developed after the 1917 October Revolution
Revolution
in Russia and it reached global dimensions during the Cold War, when the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
engaged in an intense rivalry. Anti-communism
Anti-communism
has been an element of movements holding many different political positions, including nationalist, social democratic, liberal, conservative, fascist, capitalist, anarchist and even socialist viewpoints. The first organization specifically dedicated to opposing communism was the Russian White movement, which fought in the Russian Civil War starting in 1918 against the recently established Communist government
[...More...]

"Anticommunist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

UNTCOK
The United Nations
United Nations
Temporary Commission on Korea
Korea
(UNTCOK) was a body that oversaw elections in South Korea
South Korea
in May 1948. The commission initially was composed of nine nations, and Australia, Canada and Syria played a dissenting role, resisting US plans to hold separate elections in South Korea. That position was in line with Korean moderates Kim Ku
Kim Ku
and Kim Kyu-sik.[1] In Soviet-controlled North Korea, the body was not even recognized, with the Soviets
Soviets
arguing that the commission would break the 1945 the Moscow Accords.[2] The Soviets
Soviets
also argued that it violated Articles 32 and 107 of the UN Charter. Article 32 requires that both sides of the dispute be consulted, but Korean representatives from North and South Korea
South Korea
were never invited to address the UN
[...More...]

"UNTCOK" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Workers' Party Of South Korea
The Workers' Party of South Korea
South Korea
(Korean: 남조선로동당) was a communist party in South Korea
South Korea
from 1946 to 1949. It was founded on November 23, 1946 through the merger of the South Korean Branch Bureau of the Communist Party of Korea, New People's Party of Korea and a faction of the People's Party of Korea (the so-called 'forty-eighters').[1] It was led by Pak Hon-yong.[2] The party was outlawed by the U.S. occupation authorities due to the party being an aggravating opposition to South Korea
South Korea
and the US, but the party organized a network of clandestine cells and was able to obtain a considerable following. It had around 360 000 party members.[3] In 1947 the party initiated armed guerrilla struggle
[...More...]

"Workers' Party Of South Korea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jeju International Airport
Jeju International Airport
Jeju International Airport
(Hangul: 제주국제공항, Hanja: 濟州國際空港, Revised Romanization of Korean: Jeju Gukje Gonghang, McCune-Reischauer: Cheju Kukche Konghang) (IATA: CJU, ICAO: RKPC) is the 2nd largest airport in South Korea, just behind Incheon Airport in Incheon. It is located in the city of Jeju. The airport opened in 1968. Jeju International Airport
Jeju International Airport
serves many mainland destinations in South Korea, as well as international destinations in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand
Thailand
and Malaysia. In 2015, 26,237,562 passengers used the airport. In 2017 29,604,363passengers, 167,280movements Due to the large number of passengers using the airport and its limited capacity it was announced that a second airport would be constructed on the island near the southern city of Seogwipo,Seongsan eup,SE of Jeju island with 3.8billion USD investment
[...More...]

"Jeju International Airport" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Volcano
A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle.[1] Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire
Pacific Ring of Fire
has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates
[...More...]

"Volcano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Island
An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water.[2] Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines, for example. An island may be described as such, despite the presence of an artificial land bridge; examples are Singapore
Singapore
and its causeway, and the various Dutch delta islands, such as IJsselmonde. Some places may even retain "island" in their names for historical reasons after being connected to a larger landmass by a land bridge or landfill, such as Coney Island
Coney Island
and Coronado Island, though these are, strictly speaking, tied islands
[...More...]

"Island" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cenozoic
The Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era ( /ˌsiːnəˈzoʊɪk, ˌsɛ-/)[1][2] is the current geological era, covering the period from 66 million years ago to the present day. The Cenozoic
Cenozoic
is also known as the Age of Mammals, because of the large mammals that dominate it. The continents also moved into their current positions during this era.Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Divisions2.1 Paleogene Period 2.2 Neogene 2.3 Quaternary3 Animal life 4 Tectonics 5 Climate 6 Life 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksNomenclature[edit] Cenozoic, meaning "new life," is derived from Greek καινός kainós "new," and ζωή zōḗ "life."[3] The era is also known as the Cænozoic, Caenozoic, or Cainozoic
[...More...]

"Cenozoic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Groundwater
Groundwater
Groundwater
is the water present beneath Earth's surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of rock formations. A unit of rock or an unconsolidated deposit is called an aquifer when it can yield a usable quantity of water. The depth at which soil pore spaces or fractures and voids in rock become completely saturated with water is called the water table. Groundwater
Groundwater
is recharged from, and eventually flows to, the surface naturally; natural discharge often occurs at springs and seeps, and can form oases or wetlands. Groundwater
Groundwater
is also often withdrawn for agricultural, municipal, and industrial use by constructing and operating extraction wells
[...More...]

"Groundwater" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ramsar Convention
English, French and Spanish www.ramsar.orgThe Ramsar Convention
Ramsar Convention
on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat is an international treaty for the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands.[1] It is also known as the Convention on Wetlands
[...More...]

"Ramsar Convention" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wokou
Wokou
Wokou
(Chinese: 倭寇; pinyin: Wōkòu; Japanese: Wakō; Korean: 왜구 Waegu), which literally translates to "Japanese pirates" or "dwarf pirates",[1][2] were pirates who raided the coastlines of China, Japan
Japan
and Korea.[3] Wokou
Wokou
came from a mixture of ethnicities.[4] The term wokou is a combination of Wō (倭), referring to either dwarfs or pejoratively to the Japanese, and kòu (寇) "bandit".Contents1 History1.1 Early wokou 1.2 Later wokou2 Controversy over identity 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]14th and 16th-century pirate raidsThere are two distinct eras of wokou piracy. The early wokou mostly set up camp on Japanese outlying islands, as opposed to the 16th century wokou who were mostly non-Japanese
[...More...]

"Wokou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Magma Chamber
A magma chamber is a large pool of liquid rock beneath the surface of the Earth. The molten rock, or magma, in such a chamber is under great pressure, and, given enough time, that pressure can gradually fracture the rock around it, creating a way for the magma to move upward. If it finds its way to the surface, then the result will be a volcanic eruption; consequently, many volcanoes are situated over magma chambers. These chambers are hard to detect deep within the Earth, and therefore most of those known are close to the surface, commonly between 1 km and 10 km down. Dynamics of magma chambers[edit]Magma chambers above a subducting plateMagma rises through cracks from beneath and across the crust because it is less dense than the surrounding rock. When the magma cannot find a path upwards it pools into a magma chamber. These chambers are commonly built up over time,[1][2] by successive horizontal[3] or vertical[4] magma injections
[...More...]

"Magma Chamber" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Lateral Eruption
A lateral eruption, also called a flank eruption or lateral blast if explosive, is a volcanic eruption that takes place on the flanks of a volcano instead of at the summit. Lateral eruptions are typical at rift zones where a volcano is breaking apart. Since it is easier for molten rock to flow laterally out the sides of weak flanks, the flank gives way before magma is pushed up through a conduit that feeds magma to the summit. These features are commonly found at shield volcanoes and produce basaltic lava flows and cinder cones. Lateral blasts are understood to be created by immediate decompression of a magma chamber lying not far below the flanks of a volcano. This occurred during the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens
1980 eruption of Mount St

[...More...]

"Lateral Eruption" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Parasitic Cone
A parasitic cone (also adventive cone or satellite cone) is the cone-shaped accumulation of volcanic material not part of the central vent of a volcano. It forms from eruptions from fractures on the flank of the volcano. These fractures occur because the flank of the volcano is unstable. Eventually, the fractures reach the magma chamber and generate eruptions called flank eruptions, which, in turn, produce a parasitic cone.[1] A parasitic cone can also be formed from a dike or sill cutting up to the surface from the central magma chamber in an area different from the central vent.[2] An example of parasitic cone is Mount Scott, which is the "parasite" of Mount Mazama
Mount Mazama
in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.[citation needed] A peculiar example of multiple parasitic cones is Jeju Island
Jeju Island
in South Korea
[...More...]

"Parasitic Cone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.