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Jeff Dee
Jeff Dee
Jeff Dee
(born May 15, 1961[citation needed]) is an American artist and game designer. He was the youngest artist in TSR history when he began his work at the age of eighteen. He also designed the Villains and Vigilantes superhero game
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Fantasy Art
Fantastic
Fantastic
art is a broad and loosely defined art genre.[1] It is not restricted to a specific school of artists, geographical location or historical period. It can be characterised by subject matter – which portrays non-realistic, mystical, mythical or folkloric subjects or events – and style, which is representational and naturalistic, rather than abstract - or in the case of magazine illustrations and similar, in the style of graphic novel art such as manga. Fantasy
Fantasy
has been an integral part of art since its beginnings,[2] but has been particularly important in mannerism, magic realist painting, romantic art, symbolism, surrealism and lowbrow. In French, the genre is called le fantastique, in English it is sometimes referred to as visionary art, grotesque art or mannerist art
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Magic Of Dungeons & Dragons
Magic of Dungeons & Dragons consists of spells used in the settings of the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons (D&D). D&D defined the genre of fantasy role-playing games, and remains the most popular
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Gen Con
Gen Con
Gen Con
is the largest tabletop-game convention in North America by both attendance and number of events. It features traditional pen-and-paper, board, and card games, including role-playing games, miniatures wargames, live action role-playing games, collectible card games, and strategy games. Gen Con
Gen Con
also features computer games. Attendees engage in a variety of tournament and interactive game sessions. In 2015, Gen Con
Gen Con
had 61,423 unique attendees,[2] making it one of the largest conventions in North America.[citation needed] Established in 1968 as a wargames convention by Gary Gygax, who later co-created Dungeons & Dragons, Gen Con
Gen Con
was first held in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin
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Dungeons & Dragons In Popular Culture
Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is a fantasy role-playing game first published in 1974. As the popularity of the game grew throughout the late-1970s and 1980s, it became referenced in popular culture more frequently. The complement of games, films and cultural references based on Dungeons & Dragons or similar fantasies, characters, and adventures became ubiquitous after the end of the 1970s. Dungeons & Dragons, and tabletop role-playing games in general, have exerted a deep and persistent impact on the development of all types of video games, from "first-person shooters to real-time strategy games and massively multiplayer online games",[1] which in turn play a significant and ongoing role in modern popular culture.[2] In online culture, the term dungeon has since come to mean a virtual location where people can meet and collaborate
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Dungeons & Dragons-related Products
The Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game has spawned many related products, including magazines, films and video games.Contents1 Magazines 2 Films and TV 3 Computer and video games 4 Novels4.1 2nd Edition Novels 4.2 Dragon Strike 4.3 Iconic Character 4.4 Knights of the Silver Dragon 4.5 Penhaligon 4.6 2010 relaunch4.6.1 The Abyssal Plague5 Comics 6 Board games 7 Toys 8 Software 9 Soundtrack 10 ReferencesMagazines[edit]Dragon Magazine, #342 (Paizo, 2006)In 1975, TSR began publishing The Strategic Review. At the time, role-playing games were still seen as a subgenre of the wargaming industry, and the magazine was designed not only to support D&D and TSR's other games, but also to cover wargaming in general. In short order, however, the popularity and growth of D&D made it clear that the game had not only separated itself from its wargaming origins, but had launched an entirely new industry unto itself
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Dungeons & Dragons Retro-clones
Dungeons & Dragons retro-clones are fantasy role-playing games that seek to emulate editions of Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) no longer supported by Wizards of the Coast. They are mostly made possible by the terms of the Open Game License and System Reference Document, which allows the use of much of the proprietary terminology of D&D that might otherwise collectively constitute a copyright infringement
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RPGA
The RPGA (previously called the Role Playing Game Association and the RPGA Network), is part of the organized play arm of Wizards of the Coast that organizes and sanctions role-playing games worldwide, principally under the d20 system.Contents1 History 2 Mission 3 Membership 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The RPGA (Role Playing Game Association) was founded in November 1980 by TSR, Inc., the original publishers of the Dungeons and Dragons game, primarily intended to run tournaments at gaming conventions.[1]:13 Frank Mentzer, one of the first full-time employees of TSR, f
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Sources And Influences On The Development Of Dungeons & Dragons
Sources and influences on the development of Dungeons & Dragons include fantasy fiction, mythology, and wargaming rules among others.Contents1 Development of the game system 2 Theme and fictional elements 3 Classes 4 Races 5 Creatures 6 Magic Items 7 Miscellaneous 8 Notes 9 ReferencesDevelopment of the game system[edit] An immediate predecessor of Dungeons & Dragons was a set of medieval miniature rules written by Jeff Perren. These were expanded by Gary Gygax, whose additions included a fantasy supplement, before the game was published as Chainmail
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Adventure (Dungeons & Dragons)
In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, an adventure or module is a pre-packaged book or box set that helps the Dungeon Master manage the plot or story of a game. The term adventure is currently used by the game's publisher Wizards of the Coast. In early editions of the game these publications were commonly referred to as modules, which stems from the term dungeon module, used to refer to the earliest adventures published by TSR, with other variations on the module name appearing on latter adventures. The term module continued to be popular among players of the original Dungeons & Dragons and Advanced Dungeons & Dragons even after newer publications were labeled adventure
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Alignment (Dungeons & Dragons)
In the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game, alignment is a categorization of the ethical and moral perspective of player characters, non-player characters, and creatures. Most versions of the game feature a system in which players make two choices for characters. One is the character's views on "law" vs "chaos", the other on "good" vs "evil". The two axes allow for nine alignments in combination.[1][2] These nine alignments can be shown in a grid, as follows:Lawful good Neutral good Chaotic goodLawful neutral (True) neutral Chaotic neutralLawful evil Neutral evil Chaotic evilContents1 History 2 Function 3 Axes3.1 Law vs. chaos 3.2 Good vs
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Dungeon Master
In the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) role-playing game, the Dungeon Master (often abbreviated as DM) is the game organizer and participant in charge of creating the details and challenges of a given adventure, while maintaining a realistic continuity of events.[1][2] In effect, the Dungeon Master
Dungeon Master
controls all aspects of the game, except for the actions of the player characters (PCs),[3] and describes to the players what they see and hear.[4] The title was invented for the TSR Dungeons & Dragons RPG, and was introduced in the second supplement to the game rules (Blackmoor). To avoid infringement of TSR's trademarks, and to describe referees in role-playing genres other than sword and sorcery, other gaming companies use more generic terms, like Game Master, Game Operations Director (a backronym of GOD), Judge, Referee
Referee
or Storyteller
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Dungeons & Dragons Gameplay
In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, game mechanics and die rolls determine much of what happens
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Magic Item (Dungeons & Dragons)
In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, a magic item is any object that has magical powers inherent in it. These may act on their own or be the tools of the character in whose hands they fall into
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Dungeons & Dragons Controversies
Dungeons & Dragons controversies concern the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons (D&D), which has received significant attention in the media and in popular culture. The game has received negative coverage, especially during the game's early years in the early 1980s. Because the term D&D may be mistakenly used to refer to all types of role-playing games, some controversies regarding D&D actually pertain to role-playing games in general, or to the literary genre of fantasy. Part of the controversies concern the game and its alleged impact on those who play it, while others concern business issues at the game's original publisher, TSR
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List Of Major Artifacts In Dungeons & Dragons
In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, magic items are common; however, artifacts are crafted by gods, fiends, or powerful wizards or clerics to be more permanent and potent than more ordinary magic items. Unlike typical magic items, artifacts usually cannot be created in play and cannot be disenchanted or destroyed by mundane means. Each artifact is intelligent and has specific goals
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