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Jean-Léon Gérôme
Jean-Léon Gérôme
Jean-Léon Gérôme
(11 May 1824 – 10 January 1904) was a French painter and sculptor in the style now known as academicism. The range of his oeuvre included historical painting, Greek mythology, Orientalism, portraits, and other subjects, bringing the academic painting tradition to an artistic climax. He is considered one of the most important painters from this academic period. He was also a teacher with a long list of students.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Important commissions 1.3 Orientalism 1.4 Atelier
Atelier
at Beaux-Arts 1.5 Honours 1.6 Death2 Sculpture 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References and sources 6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit]Birthplace of Jean-Léon Gérôme
Jean-Léon Gérôme
in Vesoul
Vesoul
(France). Jean-Léon Gérôme
Jean-Léon Gérôme
was born at Vesoul, Haute-Saône
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Gioachino Rossini
Gioachino Antonio Rossini[1][2] (Italian: [dʒoaˈkiːno anˈtɔːnjo rosˈsiːni] ( listen); 29 February 1792 – 13 November 1868) was an Italian composer who wrote 39 operas as well as some sacred music, songs, chamber music, and piano pieces. He was a precocious composer of operas, and he made his debut at age 18 with La cambiale di matrimonio. His best-known operas include the Italian comedies The Barber of Seville
The Barber of Seville
(Il barbiere di Siviglia), The Italian Girl in Algiers (L'italiana in Algeri), and Cinderella
Cinderella
(La Cenerentola). He also wrote a string of serious operas in Italian, including works such as Tancredi, Otello, and Semiramide. The Thieving Magpie (La gazza ladra) features one of his most celebrated overtures. Rossini moved to Paris
Paris
in 1824 where he began to set French librettos to music
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Pompeii
Pompeii
Pompeii
was an ancient Roman town-city near modern Naples, in the Campania
Campania
region of Italy, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Pompeii, along with Herculaneum
Herculaneum
and many villas in the surrounding area, was mostly destroyed and buried under 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) of volcanic ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius
Vesuvius
in AD 79. Archaeologists believe that the town was founded in the 7th or 6th century BC by the Osci
Osci
or Oscans. It came under the domination of Rome in the 4th century BC, and was conquered and became a Roman colony in 80 BC after it joined an unsuccessful rebellion against the Roman Republic
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Albert, Prince Consort
Prince Albert of Saxe- Coburg
Coburg
and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel;[1] 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria. He was born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, to a family connected to many of Europe's ruling monarchs. At the age of 20, he married his first cousin, Queen Victoria; they had nine children. Initially he felt constrained by his role of consort, which did not afford him power or responsibilities. He gradually developed a reputation for supporting public causes, such as educational reform and the abolition of slavery worldwide, and was entrusted with running the Queen's household, office and estates. He was heavily involved with the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851, which was a resounding success. Victoria came to depend more and more on his support and guidance
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Napoleon III Of France
Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (born Charles-Louis Napoléon Bonaparte; 20 April 1808 – 9 January 1873) was the President of France
President of France
from 1848 to 1852 and, as Napoleon
Napoleon
III, the Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1852 to 1870. He was the only president of the French Second Republic
French Second Republic
and the head of the Second French Empire. The nephew and heir of Napoleon
Napoleon
I, he was the first Head of State
Head of State
of France
France
to hold the title of President, the first elected by a direct popular vote, and the youngest until the election of Emmanuel Macron in 2017
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Montauban
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Montauban
Montauban
(French pronunciation: ​[mɔ̃tobɑ̃]; Occitan: Montalban) is a commune in the Tarn-et-Garonne
Tarn-et-Garonne
department in the Occitanie
Occitanie
region in southern France. It is the capital of the department and lies 50 kilometres (31 mi) north of Toulouse. Montauban
Montauban
is the most populated town in Tarn-et-Garonne, and the sixth most populated of Occitanie
Occitanie
behind Toulouse, Montpellier, Nîmes, Perpignan
Perpignan
and Béziers. In 2013, there were 57,921 inhabitants, called “Montalbanais”
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Musée Ingres
The Musée Ingres
Musée Ingres
(In English: Ingres Museum) is located in Montauban, France. It houses a collection of artworks and artifacts related to Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, and works by another famous native of Montauban, Antoine Bourdelle. In 1851, Ingres, at 71 years of age, gave part of his collection, including copies, work of pupils, and Greek vases, as a gift to the city of his birth. The Ingres room was inaugurated in 1854. The death of Ingres in January 1867 led to a considerable enrichment of the collection with additional works, in particular several thousands of drawings. The museum is located in a building that once served as the residence of the bishops of Montauban
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Toulouse
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Toulouse
Toulouse
(/tuːˈluːz/;[4] French: [tuluz] ( listen), locally [tuˈluzə] ( listen); Occitan: Tolosa [tuˈluzɔ], Latin: Tolosa) is the capital of the French department of Haute-Garonne
Haute-Garonne
and of the region of Occitanie. The city is on the banks of the River Garonne, 150 kilometres (93 miles) from the Mediterranean Sea, 230 km (143 mi) from the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and 680 km (420 mi) from Paris. It is the fourth-largest city in France, with 466,297 inhabitants as of January 2014
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Théophile Gautier
Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier
Théophile Gautier
(French: [pjɛʁ ʒyl teofil ɡotje]; 30 August 1811 – 23 October 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and art and literary critic. While an ardent defender of Romanticism, Gautier's work is difficult to classify and remains a point of reference for many subsequent literary traditions such as Parnassianism, Symbolism, Decadence and Modernism
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Jean-Louis Hamon
Jean-Louis Hamon
Jean-Louis Hamon
(5 May 1821 – 29 May 1874) was a French painter. He was born at Plouha, in today's Côtes-d'Armor
Côtes-d'Armor
département, in France. At an early age he was intended for the priesthood, and placed under the care of the brothers Lamennais, but his strong desire to become a painter finally triumphed over family opposition, and in 1840 he left Plouha
Plouha
for Paris—his sole resources being a pension of five hundred francs, granted him for one year only by the municipality of his native town. At Paris
Paris
Hamon received valuable advice and encouragement from Paul Delaroche and Charles Gleyre, and in 1848 he made his appearance at the Salon with "Le Tombeau du Christ" (Musée de Marseille), and a decorative work, Dessus de Porte
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Theatre Of Pompey
The Theatre of Pompey
Pompey
(Latin: Theatrum Pompeii, Italian: Teatro di Pompeo) was a structure in Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
built during the latter part of the Roman Republican era: completed in 55 BC. Enclosed by the large columned porticos was an expansive garden complex of fountains and statues. Along the stretch of the covered arcade were rooms dedicated to the exposition of art and other works collected by Pompey "the Great" (Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus) during his campaigns. On the opposite end of the garden complex was a curia for political meetings. The senate would often use this building along with a number of temples and halls that satisfied the requirements for their formal meetings
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Paris Salon
The Salon (French: Salon), or rarely Paris
Paris
Salon (French: Salon de Paris), beginning in 1667[1] was the official art exhibition of the Académie des Beaux-Arts
Académie des Beaux-Arts
in Paris. Between 1748 and 1890 it was arguably the greatest annual or biennial art event in the Western world. At the 1761 Salon, thirty-three painters, nine sculptors, and eleven engravers contributed.[2] From 1881 onward, it has been managed by the Société des Artistes Français.Contents1 Origins 2 Prominence (1748–1890)2.1 Early splinter groups3 Secession 4 See also 5 Gallery 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksOrigins[edit] In 1667, the royally sanctioned French institution of art patronage, the Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture[1] (a division of the Académie des beaux-arts), held its first semi-public art exhibit at the Salon Carré
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Naples
Naples
Naples
(/ˈneɪpəlz/; Italian: Napoli [ˈnaːpoli] ( listen), Neapolitan: Napule [ˈnɑːpələ] or [ˈnɑːpulə]; Latin: Neapolis; Ancient Greek: Νεάπολις, meaning "new city") is the capital of the Italian region Campania
Campania
and the third-largest municipality in Italy
Italy
after Rome
Rome
and Milan. In 2017, around 967,069 people lived within the city's administrative limits. The Metropolitan City of Naples
Metropolitan City of Naples
had a population of 3,115,320
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Tulipomania
Tulip
Tulip
mania (Dutch: tulpenmanie) was a period in the Dutch Golden Age during which contract prices for some bulbs of the recently introduced and fashionable tulip reached extraordinarily high levels and then dramatically collapsed in February 1637.[2] It is generally considered the first recorded speculative bubble;[3] although some researchers have noted that the Kipper und Wipper (literally Tipper and See-saw) episode in 1619–1622, a Europe-wide chain of debasement of the metal content of coins to fund warfare featured mania-like similarities to a bubble.[4] In many ways, the tulip mania was more of a hitherto unknown socio-economic phenomenon than a significant economic crisis. And historically, it had no critical influence on the prosperity of the Dutch Republic, the world's leading economic and financial power in the 17th century
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Prix De Rome
The Prix de Rome
Prix de Rome
(pronounced [pʁi də ʁɔm]) or Grand Prix de Rome[1] was a French scholarship for arts students, initially for painters and sculptors, that was established in 1663 during the reign of Louis XIV
Louis XIV
of France. Winners were awarded a bursary that allowed them to stay in Rome for three to five years at the expense of the state. The prize was extended to architecture in 1720, music in 1803, and engraving in 1804
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Atelier
An atelier (French: [atəlje]) is the private workshop or studio of a professional artist in the fine or decorative arts, where a principal master and a number of assistants, students, and apprentices can work together producing pieces of fine art or visual art released under the master's name or supervision. This was the standard vocational practice for European artists from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to the 19th century, and common elsewhere in the world. In medieval Europe such a way of working and form of visual or fine art education was often enforced by local guild regulations, of the painters' Guild
Guild
of Saint Luke, and those of other guilds for other crafts. Apprentices usually began young, working on simple tasks, and after some years became journeymen, before becoming masters themselves
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