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Jean-Baptiste Jourdan
American Revolutionary War Siege of Savannah
Siege of Savannah
(1779)French Revolutionary Wars Battle of Jemappes
Battle of Jemappes
(1792) Battle of Neerwinden (1793) Battle of Hondschoote (1793) Battle of Wattignies
Battle of Wattignies
(1793) Battle of Fleurus (1794) Battle of Amberg
Battle of Amberg
(1796) Battle of Würzburg
Battle of Würzburg
(1796) Battle of Ostrach
Battle of Ostrach
(1799) Battle of Stockach (1799)Napoleonic Wars Battle of Talavera
Battle of Talavera
(1809) Battle of Vitoria
Battle of Vitoria
(1813)Other work Governor of Les Invalides (1830-1833)Jean-Baptiste Jourdan, 1st Comte Jourdan (29 April 1762 – 23 November 1833), enlisted as a private in the French royal army and rose to command armies during the French Revolutionary Wars
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Chef De Bataillon
Major is a military rank of commissioned officer status, with corresponding ranks existing in many military forces throughout the world.Contents1 Background 2 Links to major ranks by country2.1 Insignia of air force majors 2.2 Insignia of army majors 2.3 Insignia of naval infantry majors3 Ranks equivalent to major by country 4 See also 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] When used unhyphenated, in conjunction with no other indicators, major is one rank senior to that of an army captain, and one rank subordinate or below the rank of lieutenant colonel
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Michael Glover
Michael Glover (1922–90) served in the British army during the Second World War, after which he joined the British Council
British Council
and became a professional author. He has written many articles and books on Napoleonic and Victorian warfare.[1] Published works[edit] Glover has written the following published works:[2]Britannia Sickens : Sir Arthur Wellesley and the Convention of Cintra, London : Leo Cooper, 1970. Wellington as Military Commander, London : Sphere Books, 1973. The Peninsular War, 1807-1814 : A Concise Military History, London : David & Charles; Hamden, Conn. : Archon Books, 1974. Rorke's Drift : A Victorian Epic, London : Cooper, 1975. General Burgoyne in Canada and America : Scapegoat for a System, London : Gordon & Cremonesi ; [New York : distributed by Atheneum Publishers], c
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Nicolas Luckner
Nicolas, Count Luckner (German: Johann Nikolaus, Graf Luckner; 12 January 1722, Cham in der Oberpfalz
Cham in der Oberpfalz
– 4 January 1794, Paris) was a German officer in French service who rose to become a Marshal of France. Luckner grew up in Cham, in eastern Bavaria
Bavaria
and received his early education from the Jesuits in Passau. Before entering the French service, Luckner spent time in the Bavarian, Dutch and Hanoverian armies. He fought as a commander of hussars during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763) in the Hanoverian army against the French. Luckner joined the French army in 1763 with the rank of lieutenant general. In 1784 he became a Danish count. He supported the French Revolution, and the year 1791 saw Luckner become a Marshal of France. In 1791-92 Luckner served as the first commander of the Army of the Rhine
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Kingdom Of France
La Parisienne (1830–1848) "The Parisian"The Kingdom of France
France
in 1789.Capital Paris
Paris
(987–1682) Versailles (1682–1789)
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Napoleonic Wars
The Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
(1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon
Napoleon
I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution
French Revolution
and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon; the Third Coalition
Third Coalition
(1805), the Fourth (1806–07), Fifth (1809), Sixth (1813), and the Seventh and final (1815). Napoleon, upon ascending to First Consul of France
France
in 1799, had inherited a chaotic republic; he subsequently created a state with stable finances, a strong bureaucracy, and a well-trained army
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Jean Nicolas Houchard
Jean Nicolas Houchard
Jean Nicolas Houchard
(24 January 1739, Forbach, Moselle
Moselle
– 17 November 1793) was a French General of the French Revolution
French Revolution
and the French Revolutionary Wars.Contents1 Biography 2 Assessment 3 Trial and execution 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Born at Forbach
Forbach
in Lorraine, Houchard began his military career at the age of sixteen in the Régiment de Royal-Allemand cavalerie. He became a captain in the Bourbon-Dragons regiment in Corsica
Corsica
and took part in the Battle of Ponte Novu
Battle of Ponte Novu
against rioters led by Pasquale Paoli, receiving a deep sabre cut across his cheek and a gunshot wound to his mouth which left him disfigured. Houchard was a fervent patriot (supporter of the French Revolution. Phipps describes Houchard as "Brave & stupid..
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Guillotine
A guillotine (/ˈɡɪlətiːn/; French: [ɡijɔtin]) is an apparatus designed for efficiently carrying out executions by beheading. The device consists of a tall, upright frame in which a weighted and angled blade is raised to the top and suspended. The condemned person is secured with stocks at the bottom of the frame, positioning the neck directly below the blade. The blade is then released, to quickly fall and forcefully decapitate the victim with a single, clean pass so that the head falls into a basket below. The device is best known for its use in France, in particular during the French Revolution, where it was celebrated as the people's avenger by supporters of the revolution and vilified as the pre-eminent symbol of the Reign of Terror
Reign of Terror
by opponents.[1] The name dates from this period, but similar devices had been used elsewhere in Europe
Europe
over several centuries
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Maubeuge
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Maubeuge
Maubeuge
(historical Dutch: Mabuse or Dutch: Malbode) is a commune in the Nord department in northern France. It is situated on both banks of the Sambre
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Prince Of Orange
Prince
Prince
of Orange is a title originally associated with the sovereign Principality of Orange, in what is now southern France. Under the Treaty of Utrecht[3] of 1713, Frederick William I of Prussia
Frederick William I of Prussia
ceded the Principality of Orange
Principality of Orange
to King Louis XIV of France
France
(while retaining the title as part of his dynastic titulature)
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General Of Brigade
Brigadier
Brigadier
general (Brig. Gen.) is a senior rank in the armed forces. It is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting between the ranks of colonel and major general. When appointed to a field command, a brigadier general is typically in command of a brigade consisting of around 4,000 troops (four battalions). In some countries a brigadier general is informally designated as a one-star general (OF-6). In some countries, this rank is given the name of brigadier, which is often considered not to be a general-officer rank, but is usually equivalent to brigadier general in the armies of nations that use the rank. The rank can be traced back to the militaries of Europe where a brigadier general, or simply a brigadier, would command a brigade in the field
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Battle Of Neerwinden (1793)
The Second Battle of Neerwinden (18 March 1793) saw a Republican French army led by Charles François Dumouriez attack a Coalition army commanded by Prince Josias of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. The Coalition army's Habsburg Austrians together with a small contingent of allied Dutch Republic troops repulsed all French assaults after bitter fighting and Dumouriez conceded defeat, withdrawing from the field. The French position in the Austrian Netherlands swiftly collapsed, ending the threat to the Dutch Republic and allowing Austria to regain control of her lost province. The War of the First Coalition engagement was fought at Neerwinden, located 57 kilometres (35 mi) east of Brussels in present-day Belgium. After Dumouriez's victory at Jemappes in November 1792, the French armies rapidly overran most of the Austrian Netherlands
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Battle Of Jemappes
The Battle of Jemappes
Jemappes
(6 November 1792) took place near the town of Jemappes
Jemappes
in Hainaut, Belgium, near Mons
Mons
during the War of the First Coalition, part of the French Revolutionary Wars. One of the first major offensive battles of the war, it was a victory for the armies of the infant French Republic, and saw the French Armée du Nord, which included a large number of inexperienced volunteers, defeat a substantially smaller regular Austrian army. General Charles François Dumouriez, in command of an army of French Revolutionary volunteers, faced the Imperial army of Field Marshal Duke Albert of Saxe-Teschen
Albert of Saxe-Teschen
and his second-in-command François de Croix, Count of Clerfayt. The French, who outnumbered their opponents by about three-to-one, launched a series of enthusiastic but uncoordinated attacks against the Austrian position on a ridge
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American War Of Independence
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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Siege Of Savannah
The Siege
Siege
of Savannah or the Second Battle of Savannah was an encounter of the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
(1775-1783), in 1779. The year before, the city of Savannah, Georgia, had been captured by a British expeditionary corps under Lieutenant-Colonel Archibald Campbell. The siege itself consisted of a joint Franco-American attempt to retake Savannah, from September 16 to October 18, 1779
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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