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Jargon
Jargon is a type of language that is used in a particular context and may not be well understood outside that context. The context is usually a particular occupation (that is, a certain trade, profession, or academic field), but any ingroup; or social group to which a person psychologically identifies as being a member, can have jargon. The main trait that distinguishes jargon from the rest of a language is special vocabulary—including some words specific to it, and often different senses or meanings of words, that outgroups would tend to take in another sense; —therefore misunderstanding that communication attempt. Jargon is thus "the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity or group".[1] Most jargon is technical terminology,[2] involving terms of art[2] or industry terms, with particular meaning within a specific industry
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Computer Science
Computer science
Computer science
(sometimes called computation science or computing science, but not to be confused with computational science or software engineering) is the study of processes that interact with data and that can be represented as data in the form of programs. It enables the use of algorithms to manipulate, store, and communicate digital information. A computer scientist studies the theory of computation and the practice of designing software systems.[1] Its fields can be divided into theoretical and practical disciplines. Computational complexity theory
Computational complexity theory
is highly abstract, while computer graphics emphasizes real-world applications. Programming language theory considers approaches to the description of computational processes, while computer programming itself involves the use of programming languages and complex systems
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Self-advocacy
Self-advocacy refers to the civil rights movement for people with developmental disabilities, also called cognitive or intellectual disabilities, and other disabilities. It is also an important term in the disability rights movement, referring to people with disabilities taking control of their own lives, including being in charge of their own care in the medical system. The self-advocacy movement is (in basic terms) about people with disabilities speaking up for themselves. It means that although a person with a disability may call upon the support of others, the individual is entitled to be in control of their own resources and how they are directed. It is about having the right to make life decisions without undue influence or control by others. People with intellectual disabilities are often some of the most powerless members of society
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Byte
The byte (/baɪt/) is a unit of digital information that most commonly consists of eight bits. Historically, the byte was the number of bits used to encode a single character of text in a computer[1][2] and for this reason it is the smallest addressable unit of memory in many computer architectures. The size of the byte has historically been hardware dependent and no definitive standards existed that mandated the size – byte-sizes from 1[3] to 48 bits[4] are known to have been used in the past. Early character encoding systems often used six bits, and machines using six-bit and nine-bit bytes were common into the 1960s. These machines most commonly had memory words of 12, 24, 36, 48 or 60 bits, corresponding to two, four, six, eight or 10 six-bit bytes
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Hexadecimal
In mathematics and computing, hexadecimal (also base 16, or hex) is a positional numeral system with a radix, or base, of 16. It uses sixteen distinct symbols, most often the symbols 0–9 to represent values zero to nine, and A, B, C, D, E, F (or alternatively a, b, c, d, e, f) to represent values ten to fifteen. Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
numerals are widely used by computer system designers and programmers. As each hexadecimal digit represents four binary digits (bits), it allows a more human-friendly representation of binary-coded values. One hexadecimal digit represents a nibble (4 bits), which is half of an octet or byte (8 bits)
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Language
Language
Language
is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system. The scientific study of language is called linguistics. Questions concerning the philosophy of language, such as whether words can represent experience, have been debated at least since Gorgias
Gorgias
and Plato
Plato
in ancient Greece. Thinkers such as Rousseau
Rousseau
have argued that language originated from emotions while others like Kant have held that it originated from rational and logical thought. 20th-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein argued that philosophy is really the study of language. Major figures in linguistics include Ferdinand de Saussure and Noam Chomsky. Estimates of the number of human languages in the world vary between 5,000 and 7,000
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium.[4] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language in Italy, and subsequently throughout the western Roman Empire. Latin
Latin
has contributed many words to the English language. In particular, Latin
Latin
(and Ancient Greek) roots are used in English descriptions of theology, the sciences, medicine, and law. By the late Roman Republic
Roman Republic
(75 BC), Old Latin
Old Latin
had been standardised into Classical Latin
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Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
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Firewall (networking)
In computing, a firewall is a network security system that monitors and controls incoming and outgoing network traffic based on predetermined security rules.[1] A firewall typically establishes a barrier between a trusted internal network and untrusted external network, such as the Internet.[2] Firewalls are often categorized as either network firewalls or host-based firewalls. Network firewalls filter traffic between two or more networks and run on network hardware
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Dumbing Down
Dumbing down is the deliberate oversimplification of intellectual content or narrowing down of human interests and emotional and social responses in education, literature, and cinema, news, video games and culture, as well as in everyday life. The term "dumbing down" originated in 1933, as movie-business slang used by screenplay writers, meaning: "[to] revise so as to appeal to those of little education or intelligence".[1] Dumbing-down varies according to subject matter, and usually involves the diminishment of critical thought, by undermining intellectual standards within language and learning; thus trivializing meaningful information, culture, and academic standards, as in the case of popular culture. Philosophically, the term "dumbing down" is a relative in definition, because what is considered dumbing down depends on the taste, value judgement, and intellect of the person
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Economics Terminology That Differs From Common Usage
In any technical subject, words commonly used in everyday life acquire very specific technical meanings, and confusion can arise when someone is uncertain of the intended meaning of a word
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Glossary Of Architecture
This page is a glossary of architecture.ContentsTop A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W ZSee also Notes ReferencesPart of a series onScienceFormalFormal logic MathematicsMathematical statistics Theoretical computer scienceGame theory Decision theoryInformation theory Systems theory Control theoryPhysicalPhysicsClassical Modern AppliedTheoretical Experimental ComputationalMechanics(classical analytical continuum fluid solid)Electromagnetism ThermodynamicsMolecular Atomic Nuclear ParticleCondensed matter PlasmaQuantum mechanics (introduction) Quantum field theory Special
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Glossary Of Ballet
Because ballet became formalized in France, a significant part of ballet terminology is in the French language.ContentsTop A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZSee also References External linksA[edit] À la seconde[edit] (French pronunciation: ​[a la səɡɔ̃d]) A position of the leg to the side with the body facing directly forward ("en face"). À la quatrième[edit] (French pronunciation: ​[a la katʁijɛm]) One of the directions of body, facing the audience (en face), arms in second position, with one leg extended either to fourth position in front (quatrième devant) or fourth position behind (quatrième derrière). À terre[edit] (French pronunciation: ​[a tɛʁ]) Touching the floor. Adagio[edit] Italian, or French adage, meaning 'slowly, at ease.'Slow movements performed with fluidity and grace. One of the typical exercises of a traditional ballet class, done both at barre and in center, featuring slow, contr
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Binomial Nomenclature
Binomial nomenclature
Binomial nomenclature
("two-term naming system"), also called binominal nomenclature ("two-name naming system") or binary nomenclature, is a formal system of naming species of living things by giving each a name composed of two parts, both of which use Latin grammatical forms, although they can be based on words from other languages. Such a name is called a binomial name (which may be shortened to just "binomial"), a binomen, binominal name or a scientific name; more informally it is also called a Latin
Latin
name. The first part of the name – the generic name – identifies the genus to which the species belongs, while the second part – the specific name or specific epithet – identifies the species within the genus. For example, humans belong to the genus Homo
Homo
and within this genus to the species Homo
Homo
sapiens
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Blazon
Heraldry
Heraldry
portalv t eIn heraldry and heraldic vexillology, a blazon is a formal description of a coat of arms, flag or similar emblem, from which the reader can reconstruct the appropriate image. The verb to blazon means to create such a description. The visual depiction of a coat of arms or flag has traditionally had considerable latitude in design, but a verbal blazon specifies the essentially distinctive elements. A coat of arms or flag is therefore primarily defined not by a picture but rather by the wording of its blazon (though often flags are in modern usage additionally and more precisely defined using geometrical specifications). Blazon
Blazon
also refers to the specialized language in which a blazon is written, and, as a verb, to the act of writing such a description
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Flag Terminology
Flag
Flag
terminology is the nomenclature, or system of terms, used in vexillology, the study of flags, to describe precisely the parts, patterns, and other attributes of flags and their display.Contents1 Flag
Flag
types 2 Flag
Flag
elements 3 Basic patterns 4 Techniques in flag display4.1 Illustrations5 Flag
Flag
identification symbols5.1 National flag
National flag
variants by use 5.2 Other symbols 5.3 In Unicode6 References 7 External links Flag
Flag
types[edit] Banderole
Banderole
or bannerol A small flag or streamer carried on the lance of a knight; or a long narrow flag flying from the mast-head of a ship. Banner Generically, a synonym for a flag of any kind
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