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Japanese Literature
Early works of Japanese literature
Japanese literature
were heavily influenced by cultural contact with China
China
and Chinese literature, often written in Classical Chinese. Indian literature
Indian literature
also had an influence through the separation of Buddhism
Buddhism
in Japan. Eventually, Japanese literature developed into a separate style, although the influence of Chinese literature and Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
remained until the end of the Edo period
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Ikebana
Ikebana
Ikebana
(生け花, "living flowers") is the Japanese art
Japanese art
of flower arrangement.[1][2] It is also known as Kadō (華道, "way of flowers"). The tradition dates back to the 7th century when floral offerings were made at altars. Later, they were placed in the tokonoma (alcove) of a home
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Sentō
Sentō
Sentō
(銭湯) is a type of Japanese communal bath house where customers pay for entrance. Traditionally these bath houses have been quite utilitarian, with a tall barrier separating the sexes within one large room, a minimum of lined up faucets on both sides and a single large bath for the already washed bathers to sit in among others. Since the second half of the 20th century, these communal bath houses have been decreasing in numbers as more and more Japanese residences now have baths. Some Japanese find social importance in going to public baths, out of the theory that physical proximity/intimacy brings emotional intimacy, which is termed skinship in pseudo-English Japanese
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Monuments Of Japan
Monuments (記念物, kinenbutsu) is a collective term used by the Japanese government's Law for the Protection of Cultural Properties to denote Cultural Properties of Japan[note 1] as historic locations such as shell mounds, ancient tombs, sites of palaces, sites of forts or castles, monumental dwelling houses and other sites of high historical or scientific value; gardens, bridges, gorges, mountains, and other places of great scenic beauty; and natural features such as animals, plants, and geological or mineral formations of high scientific value.[1]Contents1 Designated Monuments of Japan 2 Designation criteria2.1 Historic Sites and Special
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Buddhism In Japan
Buddhism
Buddhism
in Japan has been practiced since its official introduction in 552 CE according to the Nihon Shoki[1] from Baekje, Korea, by Buddhist monks.[2][3] Buddhism
Buddhism
has had a major influence on the development of Japanese society and remains an influential aspect of the culture to this day.[4] In modern times, Japan's most popular schools of Buddhism
Buddhism
are Pure Land Buddhism, Nichiren
Nichiren
Buddhism, Shingon
Shingon
Buddhism
Buddhism
and Zen. As of 2008, approximately 34% of the Japanese identify as Buddhists and the number has been growing since the 1980s, in terms of membership in organized religion
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List Of World Heritage Sites In Japan
Heritage may refer to:Contents1 History
History
and society 2 Biology 3 Arts and media3.1 Music 3.2 Other uses in arts and media4 Organizations4.1 Political parties 4.2 Schools 4.3 Other organizations5 Other uses 6 People with the surname 7 See also History
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Japanese Mobile Phone Culture
In Japan, mobile phones have become ubiquitous. In Japanese, mobile phones are called keitai denwa (携帯電話), literally "portable telephones," and are often known simply as keitai. Much of the Japanese population own cellular phones, most of which are equipped with enhancements such as video and camera capabilities. As of May 2008, 31.3% of elementary school students, and 57.6% of middle school students own a cell phone, with many of them accessing the Internet through them.[1] This pervasiveness and the particularities of their usage has led to the development of a mobile phone culture, or "keitai culture."Contents1 Features 2 Market 3 In use 4 Gyaru-moji 5 Cell phone novels 6 Mobile gaming 7 Decoration 8 Teenagers and mobile phones 9 Forefront of consumer technology 10 Negative aspects 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External linksFeatures[edit]A Japanese flip style cellular phoneJapan was a leader in mobile phone technology
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Flag Of Japan
The national flag of Japan
Japan
is a rectangular white banner bearing a crimson-red disc at its center. This flag is officially called Nisshōki (日章旗, the "sun-mark flag"), but is more commonly known in Japan
Japan
as Hi no maru (日の丸, the "circle of the sun"). It embodies the country's sobriquet: Land of the Rising Sun. The Nisshōki flag is designated as the national flag in the Law Regarding the National Flag and National Anthem, which was promulgated and became effective on August 13, 1999. Although no earlier legislation had specified a national flag, the sun-disc flag had already become the de facto national flag of Japan. Two proclamations issued in 1870 by the Daijō-kan, the governmental body of the early Meiji period, each had a provision for a design of the national flag. A sun-disc flag was adopted as the national flag for merchant ships under Proclamation No
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Japanese Garden
Japanese gardens (日本庭園, nihon teien) are traditional gardens[1] whose designs are accompanied by Japanese aesthetic and philosophical ideas, avoid artificial ornamentation, and highlight the natural landscape
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Japanese Museums
Japan was introduced to the idea of Western-style museums (hakubutsukan 博物館) as early as the Bakumatsu (幕末 ) period through Dutch studies.Contents1 History1.1 Before WWII 1.2 After WWII2 List of Japanese museums 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Before WWII[edit] Upon the conclusion of the US-Japan Amity Treaty in 1858, a Japanese delegation to America observed Western-style museums first-hand. Following the Meiji Restoration, botanist Keisuke Ito, and natural historian, Tanaka Yoshio, also wrote of the necessity of establishing museum facilities similar to the ones found in the West. Preparations commenced to construct facilities to preserve historical relics of the past. In 1872, the Museum of the Ministry of Education (Monbusho Hakubutsukan 文部省博物館) staged Japan’s first exhibition in the Yushima area of Tokyo
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Japanese Clothing
There are typically two types of clothing that the Japanese wear: the Japanese clothing
Japanese clothing
(和服, wafuku), such as kimonos, and Western clothing (洋服, yōfuku). The Japanese culture has been greatly impacted by the rest of the world throughout history. One of the most noticeable changes in Japanese culture is the clothing: traditional and modern day clothing. Kimonos and kosodes are two of the most popular traditional Japanese items of clothing. While the traditional ethnic garments of Japan
Japan
are still in use, they are mainly worn for ceremonies and special events, funerals, coming-of-age ceremonies, and festivals. In more recent years, western clothing is worn often in day-to-day life
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Onsen
An onsen  (温泉) is a Japanese hot spring and the bathing facilities and inns frequently situated around them. As a volcanically active country, Japan has thousands of onsens scattered throughout all of its major islands. Onsens come in many types and shapes, including outdoor (露天風呂 or 野天風呂, roten-buro or noten-buro) and indoor baths. Baths may be either publicly run by a municipality or privately (内湯, uchiyu), often as part of a hotel, ryokan, or bed and breakfast (民宿, minshuku). The presence of an onsen is often indicated on signs and maps by the symbol ♨ or the kanji 湯 (yu, meaning "hot water"). Sometimes the simpler hiragana character ゆ (yu), understandable to younger children, is used.Indoor onsen at Ōfuka OnsenTraditionally, onsens were located outdoors, although a large number of inns have now built indoor bathing facilities as well
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Shinto
Shinto
Shinto
(神道, Shintō) or kami-no-michi (among other names)[note 1] is the traditional religion of Japan
Japan
that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day
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Geisha
Geisha
Geisha
(芸者) (/ˈɡeɪʃə/; Japanese: [ɡe̞ːɕa̠]), geiko (芸子), or geigi (芸妓) are traditional Japanese female entertainers who act as hostesses
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Japanese Tea Ceremony
The Japanese tea ceremony, also called the Way of Tea, is a Japanese cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of matcha (抹茶), powdered green tea. In Japanese, it is called chanoyu (茶の湯) or sadō, chadō (茶道), while the manner in which it is performed, or the art of its performance, is called (o)temae ([お]手前; [お]点前).[1] Zen Buddhism
Buddhism
was a primary influence in the development of the Japanese tea ceremony. Much less commonly, Japanese tea practice uses leaf tea, primarily sencha, in which case it is known in Japanese as senchadō (煎茶道, the way of sencha) as opposed to chanoyu or chadō. Tea
Tea
gatherings are classified as an informal tea gathering chakai (茶会, tea gathering) and a formal tea gathering chaji (茶事, tea event). A chakai is a relatively simple course of hospitality that includes confections, thin tea, and perhaps a light meal
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Japanese Funeral
A Japanese funeral (葬儀 sōgi or 葬式 sōshiki) includes a wake, the cremation of the deceased, a burial in a family grave, and a periodic memorial service. According to 2007 statistics, 99.81% of deceased Japanese are cremated.[1]Contents1 Modern funerals1.1 After death 1.2 Wake 1.3 Funeral 1.4 Cremation 1.5 Grave 1.6 Mourning and memorial services2 Japanese funeral industry 3 History3.1 Medieval Sōtō Zen funerals 3.2 Today4 Films 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksModern funerals[edit] After death[edit] Although Japan has become a more secular society (see Religion in Japan), 91% of funerals are conducted as Buddhist ceremonies.[2] Immediately after a death (or, in earlier days, just before the expected death), relatives moisten the dying or deceased person's lips with water, a practice known as water of the last moment (末期の水, matsugo-no-mizu)
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