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Janet Lee Bouvier
Janet Norton Lee Auchincloss Morris (December 3, 1907 – July 22, 1989)[1] was an American socialite and the mother of the former First Lady of the United States Jacqueline Kennedy.Contents1 Early life 2 Life 3 Personal life 4 Further reading 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Janet Norton Lee was born on December 3, 1907 in Manhattan, New York City. She was the middle daughter of James Thomas Aloysius Lee (1877–1968), a lawyer and real estate developer,[2][3] and Margaret A. Merritt (1878–1943). Her parents were both of Irish descent. She had two sisters; Marion Norton Lee (1906–1947), who married John J. Ryan Jr.,[4] and Winifred Norton Lee (1912–1991), who married Franklin d'Olier.[5] Life[edit] Janet graduated from Miss Spence's School and attended Sweet Briar and Barnard Colleges
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Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
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St. George's School, Newport
St. George's websiteSt. George's School—Church of St. George, Little Chapel, and Memorial SchoolhouseU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesShow map of Rhode IslandShow map of the USLocation 372 Purgatory Rd., Middletown, Rhode IslandCoordinates 41°29′27″N 71°16′6″W / 41.49083°N 71.26833°W / 41.49083; -71.26833Area less than one acreBuilt 1910Architect Cram, Ralph Adams; et al.Architectural style Tudor Revival, Late Gothic RevivalNRHP reference # 04001235[1]Added to NRHP November 12, 2004The exterior of the St. George's School ChapelSt. George's School is a private, Episcopal, coeducational boarding school in Middletown, Rhode Island, United States, just north of the city of Newport, on a hill overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. The school was founded in 1896 by the Rev. John Byron Diman. It is a member of the Independent School League and is one of five schools collectively termed St
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Stratford, Virginia
Stratford Hall is a historic house museum near Lerty in Westmoreland County, Virginia. It was the plantation house of four generations of the Lee family
Lee family
of Virginia
Virginia
(later with descendants expanding to Maryland and other states)
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Grey Gardens
Grey Gardens
Grey Gardens
is a 1975 American documentary film by Albert and David Maysles. The film depicts the everyday lives of two reclusive, formerly upper class women, a mother and daughter both named Edith Beale, who lived in poverty at Grey Gardens, a derelict mansion at 3 West End Road in the wealthy Georgica Pond neighborhood of East Hampton, New York. The film was screened at the 1976 Cannes Film Festival but was not entered into the main competition.[3] Ellen Hovde and Muffie Meyer also directed, and Susan Froemke was the associate producer
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Stanisław Albrecht Radziwiłł
Prince Stanisław Albrecht "Stash" Radziwiłł (21 July 1914 – 27 July 1976) was a scion of the Polish princely House of Radziwiłł, born in Szpanów in the Volhynian Governorate
Volhynian Governorate
of the Russian Empire (now Szpaniv, Ukraine). His parents were Janusz Franciszek, Prince Radziwiłł (1880–1967) and Princess Anna Lubomirska (1882–1947). Stanisław had two elder brothers, Edmund Radziwiłł (1906–1971) and Ludwik Radziwiłł (1911–1928). His mother, who also came from a Polish noble family, died in a Soviet
Soviet
labour camp
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Herbert Ross
Herbert David Ross (May 13, 1927 – October 9, 2001) was an American actor, choreographer, director and producer who worked predominantly in the stage and film.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Works 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Ross was born on May 13, 1927 in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Martha Grundfast and Louis Chester Ross,[1] a postal clerk. At the age of 9, his mother died and his father moved the family to Miami and opened a luncheonette.[2] Career[edit] In 1942, Ross' stage debut came as "Third Witch" in a touring company of Macbeth. The next year brought his first Broadway performance credits with Something for the Boys
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Standard Oil
Standard Oil
Standard Oil
Co. Inc. was an American oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. Established in 1870 by John D. Rockefeller and Henry Flagler
Henry Flagler
as a corporation in Ohio, it was the largest oil refinery in the world of its time.[7] Its controversial history as one of the world's first and largest multinational corporations ended in 1911, when the United States
United States
Supreme Court ruled that Standard Oil
Standard Oil
was an illegal monopoly. Standard Oil
Standard Oil
dominated the oil products market initially through horizontal integration in the refining sector, then, in later years vertical integration; the company was an innovator in the development of the business trust
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Southampton, New York
Southampton, officially the Town of Southampton, is a town located in southeastern Suffolk County, New York, partly on the South Fork of Long Island. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town had a total population of 56,790. Southampton
Southampton
is included in the stretch of shoreline prominently known as The Hamptons. Stony Brook University's Southampton
Southampton
campus is located here.Contents1 History 2 Government and politics 3 Geography3.1 Villages (incorporated) 3.2 Hamlets (unincorporated)4 Demographics 5 Economy 6 Radio stations 7 Notable people 8 Transportation8.1 Railroad lines 8.2 Bus service 8.3 Major roads 8.4 Airports 8.5 Ferries9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit]George Bradford Brainerd (American, 1845–1887). East Side of Pond, South Hampton, Long Island, ca. 1872–1887
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Harvard
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Newport Historical Society
The Newport Historical Society
Newport Historical Society
is a historical society in Newport, Rhode Island
Rhode Island
that was chartered in 1854 to collect and preserve books, manuscripts, and object
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Hasty Pudding Club
The Hasty Pudding Institute of 1770 is a social club for Harvard students.Contents1 Aim 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAim[edit] The Hasty Pudding Club
Hasty Pudding Club
was originally established to bring together undergraduates in friendship, conversation, and camaraderie.[citation needed] History[edit] The society was founded on September 1, 1795, by Horace Binney, who was then 15, by calling together a meeting of 21 juniors in the room of Nymphas Hatch. The club is named for the traditional American dish that the founding members ate at their first meeting. Each week two members in alphabetical order had to provide a pot of hasty pudding for the Club to enjoy. It is the oldest collegiate social club in America. Originally, the Club engaged in holding mock trials, which became more elaborate throughout time
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Née
A given name (also known as a first name, forename) is a part of a person's personal name.[1] It identifies a specific person, and differentiates that person from the other members of a group (typically a family or clan) who have a common surname. The term given name refers to the fact that the name usually is bestowed upon a person, normally to a child by his or her parents at or close to the time of birth. A Christian
Christian
name, a first name which historically was given at baptism, is now also typically given by the parents at birth. In informal situations, given names are often used in a familiar and friendly manner.[1] In more formal situations, a person's surname is more commonly used—unless a distinction needs to be made between people with the same surname
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New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[5][6][7] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[8][9] The Times
The Times
is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.[10] The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[11] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[5][6][7] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[8][9] The Times
The Times
is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.[10] The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[11] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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