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James Gillespie Graham
James Gillespie Graham (11 June 1776–11 March 1855) was a Scottish architect, prominent in the early 19th century. Graham was born in Dunblane on 11 June 1776, the son of Malcolm Gillespie, a solicitor. He was christened as James Gillespie.[1] He is most notable for his work in the Scottish baronial style, as at Ayton Castle, and he also worked in the Gothic Revival style, in which he was heavily influenced by the work of Augustus Pugin. However, he also worked successfully in the neoclassical style as exemplified in his design of Blythswood House at Renfrew seven miles down the River Clyde from Glasgow. Graham designed principally country houses and churches
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Fife

Fife (/ff/, Scottish English[fɐi̯f]; Scottish Gaelic: Fìobha, IPA: [fiːvə]; Scots: Fife) is a council area, historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area of Scotland. It is situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with inland boundaries to Perth and Kinross (i.e. the historic counties of Perthshire and Kinross-shire) and Clackmannanshire. By custom it is widely held to have been one of the major Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife within Scotland. A person from Fife is known as a Fifer. Fife was a county of Scotland until 1975, having been the parliamentary constituency of Fife in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom until 1885 and the Fife constituency in the Parliament of Scotland until the Acts of Union 1707. In older documents it was very occasionally known by the anglicisation Fifeshire
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Blythswood Hill

Blythswood Hill, leading to Blythswood Square, is one of the central hills overlooking the River Clyde, which form the city of Glasgow, Scotland, and was developed as one of its prestigious residential areas from 1800 onwards, being known then as ″the magnificent New Town of Blythswood″.[1] After the Reformation the Lands of Blythswood were owned by the distinguished Glasgow merchant family Elphinstone, whose last descendant George Elphinstone became an MP of the Scots Parliament. Through his daughter it changed to the Douglas-Campbell family during the 17th century. Archibald Campbell, whose son became Lord Blythswood, setting about feuing the lands to developers.[2] It lies on the western flank of Buchanan Street and rises to a plateau before dipping again towards the Charing Cross area of Park Circus and of Woodlands. To its north is Garnet Hill
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Bearsden

Bearsden (/ˌbɛərzˈdɛn/ (listen)) is a town in East Dunbartonshire, Scotland, on the northwestern fringe of Greater Glasgow. Approximately 6 miles (10 km) from Glasgow City Centre, the town is effectively a suburb, and its housing development coincided with the 1863 introduction of a railway line. The town was named after Bearsden railway station, which was named after a nearby cottage. Bearsden was ranked the seventh-wealthiest area in Britain in a 2005 survey and has the least social housing of any town in Scotland. The Roman Antonine Wall runs through the town, and the remains of a military bath house can be seen near the town centre. In 1649, the first New Kilpatrick parish church was built, which became the centre of administration for the area. The town's official Gaelic name Cille Phàdraig Ùr (meaning "new church of Patrick") reflects the name of the parish
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Edinburgh
524,930 – Council Area[2] Edinburgh (/ˈɛdɪnbərə/ (listen);[8][9][10] Scots: Edinburgh; Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˈt̪uːn ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]) is the capital of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian (interchangeably Edinburghshire before 1921),[11] it is located in Lothian on the Firth of Forth's southern shore. Recognised as the capital of Scotland since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the monarch in Scotland. The city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, philosophy, the sciences and engineering
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Arisaig

Arisaig /ˈærəsɪɡ/ (Scottish Gaelic: Àrasaig) is a village in Lochaber, Inverness-shire, on the west coast of the Scottish Highlands, within the Rough Bounds. It is also the traditional name for part of the surrounding peninsula south of Loch Morar, extending as far east as Moidart. Etymologically, Arisaig means "the safe bay". It lies in the Scottish council area of Highland and has a population of about 300.[2]

Early history

The Arisaig coast
After raids by Vikings, Arisaig became part of the Kingdom of the Isles, a Norwegian dependency
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Falkirk

Falkirk (/ˈfɔːlkɜːrk/; Scots: The Fawkirk; Scottish Gaelic: An Eaglais Bhreac) is a large town in the Central Lowlands of Scotland, historically within the county of Stirlingshire. It lies in the Forth Valley, 23.3 miles (37.5 km) north-west of Edinburgh and 20.5 miles (33.0 km) north-east of Glasgow. Falkirk had a resident population of 32,422 at the 2001 UK Census. The population of the town had risen to 34,570 according to a 2008 estimate, making it the 20th most populous settlement in Scotland
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Skye

As with many Scottish islands, Skye's population peaked in the 19th century and then declined under the impact of the Clearances and the military losses in the First World War. From the 19th century until 1975 Skye was part of the county of Inverness-shire but the crofting economy languished and accorAs with many Scottish islands, Skye's population peaked in the 19th century and then declined under the impact of the Clearances and the military losses in the First World War. From the 19th century until 1975 Skye was part of the county of Inverness-shire but the crofting economy languished and according to Slesser, "Generations of UK governments have treated the island people contemptuously."[84] a charge that has been levelled at both Labour and Conservative administrations' policies in the Highlands and Islands.[85][Note 6] By 1971 the population was less than a third of its peak recorded figure in 1841
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Dunoon

Dunoon (/dʌˈnn/; Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Omhain) is the main town on the Cowal peninsula in the south of Argyll and Bute, Scotland. It is located on the western shore of the upper Firth of Clyde, to the south of the Holy Loch and to the north of Innellan.[2] As well as forming part of the council area of Argyll and Bute, Dunoon also has its own community council.[3] Dunoon was a burgh until 1976.[4] The early history of Dunoon often revolves around two feuding clans: the Lamonts and the Campbells
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Hopetoun House

Hopetoun House is a country house near South Queensferry owned by the Hopetoun House Preservation Trust, a charity established in 1974 to preserve the house and grounds as a national monument, to protect and improve their amenities, and to preserve the furniture, paintings, manuscripts, and other articles of historical interest associated with the house.[1] The south wing of the house is occupied by the family of Adrian Hope, 4th Marquess of Linlithgow. The house is a Category A listed building[2] and the grounds are included in the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland.[3]

Architecture
The house was built 1699–1701 and designed by Sir William Bruce. The house was then hugely extended from 1721 by William Adam until his death in 1748, being one of his most notable projects. The interior was completed by his sons John Adam and Robert Adam
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Gothic Revival

Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic, neo-Gothic, or Gothick) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. Its momentum grew in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time. Gothic Revival draws features from the original Gothic style, including decorative patterns, finials, lancet windows, hood moulds and label stops. By the mid-19th century, it was established as the preeminent architectural style in the Western world. The Gothic Revival movement's roots are intertwined with deeply philosophical movements associated with Catholicism and a re-awakening of high church or Anglo-Catholic belief concerned by the growth of religious nonconformism
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