HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

James Nicol
James Nicol
James Nicol
FRSE
FRSE
FGS (12 August 1810 – 8 April 1879) was a Scottish geologist.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Works 4 Notes 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born at Traquair, near Innerleithen
Innerleithen
in Peeblesshire, the son of Rev. James Nicol
James Nicol
(1769–1819), and his wife Agnes Walker. He studied Arts and Divinity at Edinburgh
Edinburgh
University from 1825. He also attended the lectures of Robert Jameson, having gained a keen interest in geology and mineralogy. He further pursued these studies in the universities of Bonn and Berlin. After returning home Nicol worked at local geology and obtained prizes from the Highland Society for essays on the geology of Peeblesshire and Roxburghshire, now areas of the Scottish Borders
[...More...]

"James Nicol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sandstone
Sandstone
Sandstone
is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized (0.0625 to 2 mm) mineral particles or rock fragments. Most sandstone is composed of quartz or feldspar because they are the most resistant minerals to weathering processes at the Earth's surface, as seen in Bowen's reaction series. Like uncemented sand, sandstone may be any color due to impurities within the minerals, but the most common colors are tan, brown, yellow, red, grey, pink, white, and black. Since sandstone beds often form highly visible cliffs and other topographic features, certain colors of sandstone have been strongly identified with certain regions. Rock formations that are primarily composed of sandstone usually allow the percolation of water and other fluids and are porous enough to store large quantities, making them valuable aquifers and petroleum reservoirs
[...More...]

"Sandstone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas George Bonney
Thomas George Bonney
Thomas George Bonney
FRS (27 July 1833 – 10 December 1923) was an English geologist, president of the Geological Society of London.[1]Contents1 Career 2 Publications 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit] Bonney was born in Rugeley, Staffordshire, England, the eldest son of the Reverend Thomas Bonney, headmaster of Rugeley
Rugeley
Grammar School.[2] His uncle was the Australian explorer Charles Bonney, and one of his brothers, Frederic Bonney, is remembered for his photography and ethnology in Australia.[3] Thomas was educated at Uppingham School
Uppingham School
and St John's College, Cambridge, where he graduated as 12th wrangler in 1856, and was ordained in the following year.[2] From 1856 to 1861 he was mathematical master at Westminster School, and he pursued geology only as a recreational activity, mainly in Alpine regions
[...More...]

"Thomas George Bonney" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
[...More...]

"Limestone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Schist
Schist
Schist
(pronounced /ʃɪst/ SHIST) is a medium-grade metamorphic rock[1] with medium to large, flat, sheet-like grains in a preferred orientation (nearby grains are roughly parallel). It is defined by having more than 50% platy and elongated minerals,[2] often finely interleaved with quartz and feldspar.[3] These lamellar (flat, planar) minerals include micas, chlorite, talc, hornblende, graphite, and others. Quartz
Quartz
often occurs in drawn-out grains to such an extent that a particular form called quartz schist is produced. Schist
Schist
is often garnetiferous. Schist
Schist
forms at a higher temperature and has larger grains than phyllite.[4] Geological foliation (metamorphic arrangement in layers) with medium to large grained flakes in a preferred sheetlike orientation is called schistosity.[4] The names of various schists are derived from their mineral constituents
[...More...]

"Schist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gneiss
Gneiss
Gneiss
(/ˈnaɪs/) is a common distributed type of rock formed by high-grade regional metamorphic processes from pre-existing formations that were originally either igneous or sedimentary rocks. It is often foliated (composed of layers of sheet-like planar structures). The foliations are characterized by alternating darker and lighter colored bands, called "gneissic banding".Contents1 Etymology 2 Composition2.1 Gneissic banding3 Types3.1 Augen
Augen
gneiss 3.2 Henderson gneiss 3.3 Lewisian gneiss 3.4 Archean
Archean
and Proterozoic
Proterozoic
gneiss4 See also 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word gneiss has been used in English since at least 1757
[...More...]

"Gneiss" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Lapworth
Lapworth
Lapworth
is a village and civil parish in Warwickshire, England, with a population of 2,100 according to the 2001 census, falling to 1,828 at the Census 2011.[1] It lies six miles (10 km) south of Solihull
Solihull
[...More...]

"Charles Lapworth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ben Peach
Benjamin Neeve Peach, FRS FRSE
FRSE
FGS LLD (6 September 1842 – 29 January 1926) was a British geologist.Contents1 Life 2 Notable persons working under Peach 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born at Gorran Haven
Gorran Haven
in Cornwall to Charles William Peach, an amateur British naturalist and geologist, and his wife Jemima Mabson.[1] Ben was educated at the Royal School of Mines
Royal School of Mines
in London and then joined the Geological Survey in 1862 as a geologist, moving to the Scottish branch in 1867. He is best remembered for his work on the Northwest Highlands and Southern Uplands with his friend and colleague John Horne, where they resolved the long-running debate on the geological formation of the Highlands.[2] In 1881 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society
Fellow of the Royal Society
of Edinburgh
[...More...]

"Ben Peach" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Horne
John Horne
John Horne
PRSE FRS FRSE
FRSE
FEGS LLD (1 January 1848 – 30 May 1928) was a Scottish geologist.[1] He served as President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh from 1915 to 1919.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Recognition 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Horne was born on 1 January 1848, in Campsie, Stirlingshire, the son of James Horne of Newmill and his wife Janet Braid. John was educated at the High School, Glasgow, and Glasgow University. He joined the Scottish Branch of HM Geological Survey
HM Geological Survey
in 1867 as an assistant and became an apprentice to Ben Peach. The two soon became good friends and collaborators. Horne was involved in mapping the Central Lowlands. Horne was a logical thinker and writer, complementing Peach's skills of resolving the internal structure of mountains by looking at the surface rocks
[...More...]

"John Horne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Thomas Jamieson
Thomas Francis Jamieson (1829-1913) was a Scottish scientist most associated with his studies of sea level and glacial isostasy during the Quaternary.[1] Born the son of a jeweller, Jamieson was raised in Aberdeen and educated at Aberdeen Grammar School and the University of Aberdeen, at which he was appointed Fordyce Lecturer in Agriculture in 1862,[2] a post he held for 15 years. He was later employed as the factor managing the estate lands of Ellon Castle in Aberdeenshire.[1] Interested in geology from an early age, Jamieson corresponded widely with other scientists, including Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin.[3] After early research on petrology, Jamieson studied the glaciated rocks of Scotland, providing evidence for the then-fledgling theory of ice ages
[...More...]

"Thomas Jamieson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
[...More...]

"Encyclopædia Britannica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sidney Lee
Sir Sidney Lee
Sidney Lee
FBA (5 December 1859 – 3 March 1926) was an English biographer, writer and critic.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Lee was born Solomon Lazarus Lee in 1859 at 12 Keppel Street, Bloomsbury, London. He was educated at the City of London
London
School and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he graduated in modern history in 1882. In 1883, Lee became assistant-editor of the Dictionary of National Biography. In 1890 he became joint editor, and on the retirement of Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
in 1891, succeeded him as editor. Lee wrote over 800 articles in the Dictionary, mainly on Elizabethan authors or statesmen. His sister Elizabeth Lee also contributed. While still at Balliol, Lee had written two articles on Shakespearean questions, which were printed in The Gentleman's Magazine
[...More...]

"Sidney Lee" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
[...More...]

"SNAC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dictionary Of National Biography
The Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.Contents1 First series 2 Supplements and revisions 3 Concise dictionary 4 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 5 First series contents 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksFirst series[edit] Hoping to emulate national biographical collections published elsewhere in Europe, such as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (1875), in 1882 the publisher George Smith (1824–1901), of Smith, Elder & Co., planned a universal dictionary that would include biographical entries on individuals from world history. He approached Leslie Stephen, then editor of the Cornhill Magazine, owned by Smith, to become the editor
[...More...]

"Dictionary Of National Biography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.