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James Lansdale Hodson
James Lansdale Hodson (1891-1956) was a British novelist, scriptwriter and journalist. He was a war correspondent and northern editor of the Daily Mail.[1] Born in Bury, Lancashire
Bury, Lancashire
in 1891, Hodson worked as a war correspondent during World War II, and he wrote a war diary that was published by Victor Gollancz as a series of 7 books; Through the Dark Night, Towards the Morning, Before Daybreak, 'War in the Sun, Home Front, And Yet I like America and The Sea and the Land.[1] He also wrote the official British film Desert Victory
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Daily Mail
Northcliffe House 2 Derry Street London W8 5TTCirculation 1,383,932 (as of November 2017)[1]ISSN 0307-7578 OCLC
OCLC
number 16310567Website www.dailymail.co.ukThe Daily Mail
Daily Mail
is a British daily middle-market[2][3] tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail
Daily Mail
and General Trust[4] and published in London. It is the United Kingdom's second-biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun.[5] Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday
The Mail on Sunday
was launched in 1982 while Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively
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Bury, Lancashire
Bury
Bury
(/ˈbɛri/, locally also /ˈbʊrɪ/) is a town in Greater Manchester, England,[1] on the River Irwell. It lies 5.5 miles (8.9 km) east of Bolton, 5.9 miles (9.5 km) west-southwest of Rochdale
Rochdale
and 7.9 miles (12.7 km) north-northwest of Manchester. Bury
Bury
is the largest administrative centre of the Metropolitan Borough of Bury, with an estimated population in 2015 of 78,723.[2] The borough of Bury
Bury
has a wider population of 187,474 as of 2011. Historically part of Lancashire, Bury
Bury
emerged in the Industrial Revolution as a mill town manufacturing textiles. Bury
Bury
is known for its open-air Bury Market
Bury Market
and the traditional local dish, black pudding
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War Correspondent
A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. They were also called special correspondents in the 19th century.Contents1 Methods 2 History2.1 Crimean War 2.2 Third Italian War
War
of Independence 2.3 Russo-Japanese War 2.4 First and Second Balkan Wars 2.5 First World War 2.6 Vietnam
Vietnam
War 2.7 Gulf War3 Notable war correspondents3.1 19th century 3.2 20th century 3.3 21st century4 Books by war correspondents 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksMethods[edit] Their jobs require war correspondents to deliberately go to the most conflict-ridden parts of the world. Once there, they attempt to get close enough to the action to provide written accounts, photos, or film footage. Thus, being a war correspondent is often considered the most dangerous form of journalism. On the other hand, war coverage is also one of the most successful branches of journalism
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Victor Gollancz
Sir Victor Gollancz (/ɡəˈlæns, -ˈlænts/; 9 April 1893 – 8 February 1967) was a British publisher and humanitarian. Gollancz was often noted as a supporter of left-wing causes. His loyalties shifted between Liberalism
Liberalism
and Communism, but he defined himself as a Christian Socialist and Internationalist. Although he gained high credibility by forecasting the Nazi
Nazi
extermination of Jews, he campaigned for friendship with both Germany
Germany
and Soviet Russia. He used his publishing house chiefly to promote pacifist and socialist non-fiction, and also launched the Left Book Club. In the postwar era, he focused his attention on Germany
Germany
and became noted for his promotion of friendship and reconciliation based on his internationalism and his ethic of brotherly love
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Joseph Losey
Joseph Walton Losey III (January 14, 1909 – June 22, 1984) was an American theatre and film director, born in Wisconsin. He studied in Germany
Germany
with Bertolt Brecht
Bertolt Brecht
and then returned to the United States, eventually making his way to Hollywood. Blacklisted in the United States in the 1950s, he moved to Europe where he made the remainder of his films, mostly in the United Kingdom
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Dirk Bogarde
Sir
Sir
Dirk Bogarde
Dirk Bogarde
(born Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde; 28 March 1921 – 8 May 1999) was an English actor and writer. Initially a matinée idol in films such as Doctor in the House (1954) for the Rank Organisation, he later acted in art-house films. In a second career, he wrote seven best-selling volumes of memoirs, six novels and a volume of collected journalism, mainly from articles in The Daily Telegraph. Bogarde came to prominence in films including The Blue Lamp
The Blue Lamp
in the early 1950s, before starring in the successful Doctor film series (1954–63). He twice won the BAFTA
BAFTA
Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role; for The Servant (1963) and Darling (1965)
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Manchester City Council
Manchester
Manchester
City Council is the local government authority for Manchester, a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. It is composed of 96 councillors, three for each of the 32 electoral wards of Manchester. The council is controlled by the Labour Party and led by Sir Richard Leese. Joanne Roney is the chief executive
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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IMDb
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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Goodreads
Goodreads
Goodreads
is a "social cataloging" website that allows individuals to freely search its database of books, annotations, and reviews. Users can sign up and register books to generate library catalogs and reading lists. They can also create their own groups of book suggestions, surveys, polls, blogs, and discussions. The website's offices are located in San Francisco.[2] The company is currently owned by the online retailer Amazon. Goodreads
Goodreads
was founded in December 2006 and launched in January 2007 by Otis Chandler, a software engineer and entrepreneur, and Elizabeth Khuri.[3][4] The website grew rapidly in popularity after being launched
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National Portrait Gallery, London
1,949,330 (2016)[1][2]Ranked 11th nationally Ranked 22nd art museum globally (2014)[1]Director Nicholas Cullinan[3]Public transit access Charing Cross Charing Cross; Leicester Square; EmbankmentWebsite npg.org.ukThe National Portrait
Portrait
Gallery (NPG) is an art gallery in London housing a collection of portraits of historically important and famous British people. It was the first portrait gallery in the world when it opened in 1856.[4] The gallery moved in 1896 to its current site at St Martin's Place, off Trafalgar Square, and adjoining the National Gallery. It has been expanded twice since then. The National Portrait Gallery also has regional outposts at Beningbrough Hall
Beningbrough Hall
in Yorkshire and Montacute House
Montacute House
in Somerset
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Desert Victory
Desert Victory
Desert Victory
is a 1943 film produced by the British Ministry of Information, documenting the Allies' North African campaign against Field Marshal
Field Marshal
Erwin Rommel
Erwin Rommel
and the Afrika Korps. This documentary traces the struggle between General Erwin Rommel
Erwin Rommel
and Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, from the German's defeat at El Alamein
El Alamein
to Tripoli. The film was produced by David MacDonald and directed by Roy Boulting who also directed Tunisian Victory
Tunisian Victory
and Burma Victory. Like the famous "Why We Fight" series of films by Frank Capra, Desert Victory
Desert Victory
relies heavily on captured German newsreel footage. Many of the most famous sequences in the film have been excerpted and appear with frequency in History Channel and A&E productions
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King & Country
King and Country (stylised as King & Country) is a 1964 British war film directed by Joseph Losey, shot in black and white, and starring Dirk Bogarde and Tom Courtenay. The film was adapted for the screen by British screenwriter Evan Jones based on a play by John Wilson and a novel by James Lansdale Hodson.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Awards 5 External links 6 See alsoPlot[edit] During the First World War, in the British trenches at Passchendaele, an army private, Arthur Hamp (Tom Courtenay) is accused of desertion. He is to be defended at his trial by Captain Hargreaves (Dirk Bogarde)
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