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James K. Polk
James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) was an American politician who served as the 11th President of the United States (1845–1849). He previously was Speaker of the House of Representatives (1835–1839) and Governor of Tennessee
Governor of Tennessee
(1839–1841). A protégé of Andrew Jackson, he was a member of the Democratic Party and an advocate of Jacksonian democracy. During Polk's presidency, the United States expanded significantly with the annexation of the Republic of Texas, the Oregon Territory, and the Mexican Cession following the American victory in the Mexican–American War. After building a successful law practice in Tennessee, Polk was elected to the state legislature (1823) and then to the United States House of Representatives in 1825, becoming a strong supporter of Jackson. After serving as chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, he became Speaker in 1835, the only president to have been Speaker
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Nashville, Tennessee
Nashville
Nashville
(/ˈnæʃvɪl/[6]) is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee
Tennessee
and the seat of Davidson County.[7] It is located on the Cumberland River
Cumberland River
in northern Middle Tennessee. The city is a center for the music,[8] healthcare, publishing, private prison,[9] banking and transportation industries, and is home to numerous colleges and universities. Since 1963, Nashville
Nashville
has had a consolidated city-county government, which includes six smaller municipalities in a two-tier system. The city is governed by a mayor, a vice-mayor, and a 40-member Metropolitan Council; 35 of the members are elected from single-member districts, while the other five are elected at-large
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Mexican Cession
The Mexican Cession
Mexican Cession
is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States
United States
that Mexico
Mexico
ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848. This region had not been part of the areas east of the Rio Grande
Rio Grande
which had been claimed by the Republic of Texas, though the Texas annexation
Texas annexation
resolution two years earlier had not specified the southern and western boundary of the new State of Texas. The Mexican Cession
Mexican Cession
(529,000 sq. miles) was the third largest acquisition of territory in US history. The largest was the Louisiana Purchase, with some 827,000 sq. miles (including land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces), followed by the acquisition of Alaska (about 586,000 sq
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Lawyer
A lawyer or attorney is a person who practices law, as an advocate, barrister, attorney, counselor, solicitor, not as a paralegal or charter executive secretary.[1] Working as a lawyer involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who hire lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies greatly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in only the most general terms.[2][3]Contents1 Terminology 2 Responsibilities2.1 Oral argument in the courts 2.2 Research and drafting of court papers 2.3 Advocacy (written and oral) in administrative hearings 2.4 Client intake and counseling (with regard to pending litigation) 2.5 Legal advice 2.6 Protecting intellectual property 2.7 Negotiating and drafting contracts 2.8 Conveyancing 2.9 Carrying out the intent of the deceased 2.10 Prosecution and defense of criminal suspects3 Educati
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Republic Of Texas
French and German Native languages (Caddo, Comanche) and Portuguese regionallyGovernment Constitutional republicPresident1 •  1836 David G. Burnet •  1836–38 Sam Houston, 1st term •  1838–41 Mirabeau B. Lamar •  1841–44 Sam Houston, 2nd term •  1844–46 Anson JonesVice President1 •  1836 Lorenzo de Zavala •  1836–38 Mirabeau B. Lamar •  1838–41 David G. Burnet •  1841–44 Edward Burleson •  1844–45 Kenneth L
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Oregon Territory
Seal of the Oregon
Oregon
TerritoryCapital Oregon
Oregon
City (1848–1851) Salem (1851–1855) Corvallis (1855) Salem (1855–1859)Government Organized
Organized
incorporated territoryGovernor •  1848–1850; 1853 Joseph Lane •  1850 Kintzing Prichette •  1850–1853 John P. Gaines •  1853–1854 John W. Davis •  1854–1859 George L
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Mathew Brady
Mathew B. Brady (May 18, 1822 – January 15, 1896) was one of the earliest photographers in American history, best known for his scenes of the Civil War. He studied under inventor Samuel F. B. Morse, who pioneered the daguerreotype technique in America. Brady opened his own studio in New York in 1844, and photographed Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and Abraham Lincoln, among other celebrities. When the Civil War started, his use of a mobile studio and darkroom enabled vivid battlefield photographs that brought home the reality of war to the public. Thousands of war scenes were captured, as well as portraits of generals and politicians on both sides of the conflict, though most of these were taken by his assistants, rather than by Brady himself. After the war, these pictures went out of fashion, and the government did not purchase the master-copies as he had anticipated
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John Alexander Cocke
John Alexander Cocke (1772 – February 16, 1854) was an American politician and soldier who represented Tennessee's 2nd district in the United States House of Representatives from 1819 to 1827. He also served several terms in the Tennessee Senate and the Tennessee House of Representatives, and was Speaker of the latter for two sessions (1811–1813 and 1837–1839). During the Creek War, Cocke commanded the Eastern Division of the Tennessee militia.Contents1 Early life 2 Creek War 3 Congress and later life 4 Family 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Cocke was born in Brunswick, Nottoway County, Virginia in 1772, the eldest son of frontiersman and future senator, William Cocke, and wife Mary (Maclin) Cocke. While still a young child, he moved with his parents across the Appalachian Mountains to what is now Tennessee, where his father was active in the State of Franklin movement. The family settled in what is now Grainger County, but was then part of Hawkins County
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U.S. House Of Representatives
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
United States

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United States House Of Representatives
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
United States

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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Ireland
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland
Ireland
was a sovereign country in western Europe, the predecessor to the modern United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland. It was established on 1 January 1801 by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. Britain financed the European coalition that defeated France in 1815 in the Napoleonic Wars. Britain, with its unsurpassed Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and British Empire, became the foremost world power for the next century. The Crimean War
Crimean War
with Russia and the Boer wars were relatively small operations in a largely peaceful century.[1] Rapid industrialisation that began in the decades prior to the state's formation continued up until the mid-19th century
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Vice President Of The United States
The Vice President of the United States
United States
(informally referred to as VPOTUS, or Veep) is a constitutional officer in the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States
United States
as the President of the Senate under
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Plantations In The American South
Plantations were an important aspect of the history of the American South, particularly the antebellum (pre-American Civil War) era
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Churchill Cambreleng
Churchill Caldom Cambreleng (October 24, 1786 – April 30, 1862) was an American politician from New York.Contents1 Life 2 Death and burial 3 Legacy 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit]Historical marker designating the birth city of CambrelengC. C. Cambreleng was born in Washington, Beaufort County, North Carolina on October 24, 1786. He attended school in New Bern, North Carolina, and moved to New York City in 1802. Intending to begin a career as a businessman, Cambreleng worked as a clerk in a mercantile counting room. In 1806 he moved to Providence, Rhode Island, where he was the chief clerk for a merchant with interests in the Pacific Northwest
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