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James Hilton (novelist)
James Hilton (9 September 1900 – 20 December 1954) was an English novelist best remembered for several best-sellers, including Lost Horizon
Lost Horizon
and Goodbye, Mr. Chips. He also wrote Hollywood screenplays.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Novels2.1 Lost Horizon 2.2 Goodbye, Mr. Chips3 Oscar winner 4 Works4.1 Novels 4.2 Non-fiction 4.3 Short stories 4.4 Plays 4.5 Screenplays5 Adaptations and sequels of his works 6 Memorials 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Leigh, Lancashire, England, Hilton was the son of John Hilton, the headmaster of Chapel End School in Walthamstow
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Joseph Rock
Joseph Francis Charles Rock (1884 – 1962) was an Austrian-American explorer, geographer, linguist and botanist.Contents1 Life 2 Plants named after him 3 Works 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Vienna, Austria, went to Egypt at the age of 10 with his father, and later wandered about in Europe. But on an impulse, he emigrated to the United States in 1905 (New York) and moved to Honolulu, Hawaii
Hawaii
in 1907, where he eventually became an authority on the flora there. He first taught full-time (there were two others) at Mills College (now known as Mid-Pacific Institute), and was placed on leave in Sept
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The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
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Mathematician
A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics in his or her work, typically to solve mathematical problems. Mathematics
Mathematics
is concerned with numbers, data, quantity, structure, space, models, and change.Contents1 History 2 Required education 3 Activities3.1 Applied mathematics 3.2 Abstract mathematics 3.3 Mathematics
Mathematics
teaching 3.4 Consulting4 Occupations 5 Quotations about mathematicians 6 Prizes in mathematics 7 Mathematical autobiographies 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksHistory This section is on the history of mathematicians
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Danes
Danish (mutually intelligible languages incl. Norwegian, Swedish, Faroese, Icelandic)Religion Lutheranism
Lutheranism
(Church of Denmark)[21] Further details: Religion in DenmarkRelated ethnic groupsSwedes, Norwegians, Germans, Frisians, English, Faroese, Icelanders Other Germanic peoples Danes
Danes
(Danish: danskere) are the citizens of Denmark, most of whom speak Danish and consider themselves to be of Danish ethnicity. The first mentions of Danes
Danes
are from the 6th century in Jordanes' Getica, by Procopius, and by Gregory of Tours
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Tibet
Coordinates: 31°12′N 88°48′E / 31.2°N 88.8°E / 31.2; 88.8              "Greater Tibet" as claimed by Tibetan exile groups Tibetan autonomous areas, as designated by China  Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region, within ChinaChinese-controlled, claimed by
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Ethnologist
Ethnology
Ethnology
(from the Greek ἔθνος, ethnos meaning "nation"[1]) is the branch of anthropology that compares and analyses the characteristics of different peoples and the relationship between them (cf
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Botanist
Botany, also called plant science(s), plant biology or phytology, is the science of plant life and a branch of biology. A botanist, plant scientist or phytologist is a scientist who specialises in this field. The term "botany" comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word βοτάνη (botanē) meaning "pasture", "grass", or "fodder"; βοτάνη is in turn derived from βόσκειν (boskein), "to feed" or "to graze".[1][2][3] Traditionally, botany has also included the study of fungi and algae by mycologists and phycologists respectively, with the study of these three groups of organisms remaining within the sphere of interest of the International Botanical Congress
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Austrian-American
Austrian Americans (German: Austroamerikaner) are European Americans of Austrian descent. According to the 2000 U.S. census, there were 735,128 Americans of full or partial Austrian descent, accounting for 0.3% of the population. The states with the largest Austrian American populations were New York (93,083), California (84,959), Pennsylvania (58,002) (most of them in the Lehigh Valley), Florida (54,214), New Jersey (45,154), and Ohio (27,017).[2] This may be an undercount, as many German Americans have ancestors from Austria, the Austrian Empire or the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which was a major source of immigrants to the United States before World War I
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Weaverville, California
Weaverville is a census designated place and the county seat of Trinity County, California in the United States. The population was 3,600 at the 2010 census, up from 3,554 at the 2000 census.Contents1 History 2 Weaverville Joss House State Historic Park 3 Geography and climate 4 Demographics4.1 2010 4.2 20005 Government 6 Events 7 Cultural references 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Founded in 1850, Weaverville is a historic California Gold Rush town. Located at the foot of the current Trinity Alps Wilderness Area, Weaverville was once home to approximately 2,000 Chinese gold miners, and had its own Chinatown. Logging and tourism were the economic mainstays of Weaverville for many years. The regional economy has been in steady decline for many years, with only a small uplift brought about by the global real estate bubble. As of April, 2009 Trinity County’s unemployment rate stood at 20.9% (NY Times)
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National Geographic Magazine
National Geographic, formerly the National Geographic
National Geographic
Magazine, is the official magazine of the National Geographic
National Geographic
Society. It has been published continuously since its first issue in 1888, nine months after the Society itself was founded. It primarily contains articles about science, geography, history, and world culture. The magazine is known for its thick square-bound glossy format with a yellow rectangular border and its extensive use of dramatic photographs. Controlling interest
Controlling interest
in the magazine has been held by 21st Century Fox since 2015. The magazine is published monthly, and additional map supplements are also included with subscriptions. It is available in a traditional printed edition and through an interactive online edition
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Trinity County, California
Trinity County is a county in the northwestern part of the state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,786,[2] making it the fourth least-populous county in California. The county seat and largest community is Weaverville.[4] Weaverville has the distinction of housing some of California's oldest buildings. The courthouse, built in 1856, is the second oldest in the state, and the Weaverville Drug Store has been filling prescriptions since 1852. The Joss House is an historic Taoist temple built in 1873. Trinity County is rugged, mountainous, heavily forested, and lies along the Trinity River within the Salmon and Klamath Mountains
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Junction City, California
Junction City is a census-designated place (CDP) in Trinity County, California.[2] Junction City sits at an elevation of 1,909 feet (582 m).[2] Junction City is located 8 miles (13 km) west of Weaverville. The ZIP Code is 96048. The community is inside area code 530. The 2010 United States census reported Junction City's population was 680.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Politics 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Junction City was established when a few cabins were built in the 1850s at the mouth of Canyon Creek, it was originally called "Milltown" due to the number of mills, but in 1861 it was officially named Junction City since it served as a junction for several transportation routes at Canyon Creek and Trinity River. Junction City had the largest and most famous diversion dam. The Arkansas Dam,[3] was built in 1851, four miles upstream of Junction City
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Freud
Sigmund Freud
Freud
(/frɔɪd/ FROYD;[3] German: [ˈziːkmʊnt ˈfʁɔʏt]; born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.[4] Freud
Freud
was born to Galician Jewish
Jewish
parents in the Moravian town of Freiberg, in the Austrian Empire. He qualified as a doctor of medicine in 1881 at the University of Vienna.[5][6] Upon completing his habilitation in 1885, he was appointed a docent in neuropathology and became an affiliated professor in 1902.[7] Freud
Freud
lived and worked in Vienna, having set up his clinical practice there in 1886. In 1938 Freud
Freud
left Austria to escape the Nazis
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Tibetan Buddhist
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa
Kadampa
Buddhism Shambhala
Shambhala
BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPractices


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Southwest China
Southwest China
China
(Chinese: 西南; pinyin: Xīnán) is a region of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
defined by governmental bureaus that includes the municipality of Chongqi
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