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James A. Garfield
American Civil WarBattle of Middle Creek Battle of Shiloh Siege of Corinth Battle of ChickamaugaJames Abram Garfield
Abram Garfield
(November 19, 1831 – September 19, 1881) was the 20th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1881, until his assassination later that year. Garfield had served nine terms in the House of Representatives, and had been elected to the Senate before his candidacy for the White House, though he declined the Senate seat once he was elected president. He is the only sitting House member to be elected president.[1] Garfield was raised by his widowed mother in humble circumstances on an Ohio
Ohio
farm. He worked at various jobs, including on a canal boat, in his youth. Beginning at age 17, he attended several Ohio
Ohio
schools, then studied at Williams College
Williams College
in Williamstown, Massachusetts, graduating in 1856
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Williamstown, Massachusetts
Williamstown is a town in Berkshire County, in the northwest corner of Massachusetts, United States. It shares a border with Vermont
Vermont
to the north and New York to the west. It is part of the Pittsfield, Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Metropolitan Statistical Area
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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Teacher
A teacher (also called a school teacher or, in some contexts, an educator) is a person who helps others to acquire knowledge, competences or values. Informally the role of teacher may be taken on by anyone (e.g. when showing a colleague how to perform a specific task). In some countries, teaching young people of school age may be carried out in an informal setting, such as within the family (homeschooling), rather than in a formal setting such as a school or college. Some other professions may involve a significant amount of teaching (e.g. youth worker, pastor). In most countries, formal teaching of students is usually carried out by paid professional teachers
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Laity
A layperson (also layman or laywoman) is a person who is not qualified in a given profession and/or does not have specific knowledge of a certain subject. In religious organizations, the laity consists of all members who are not members of the clergy, usually including any non-ordained members of religious institutes, e.g. a nun or lay brother.[1][2] In Christian
Christian
cultures, the term lay priest was sometimes used in the past to refer to a secular priest, a diocesan priest who is not a member of a religious institute.[citation needed] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints uses the term "Lay Priesthood" to emphasise that local congregational leaders are unpaid
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-ou
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Mathew Brady
Mathew B. Brady (May 18, 1822 – January 15, 1896) was one of the earliest photographers in American history, best known for his scenes of the Civil War. He studied under inventor Samuel F. B. Morse, who pioneered the daguerreotype technique in America. Brady opened his own studio in New York in 1844, and photographed Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and Abraham Lincoln, among other celebrities. When the Civil War started, his use of a mobile studio and darkroom enabled vivid battlefield photographs that brought home the reality of war to the public. Thousands of war scenes were captured, as well as portraits of generals and politicians on both sides of the conflict, though most of these were taken by his assistants, rather than by Brady himself. After the war, these pictures went out of fashion, and the government did not purchase the master-copies as he had anticipated
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Major General (United States)
In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and United States Air Force, major general is a two-star general-officer rank, with the pay grade of O-8. Major general ranks above brigadier general and below lieutenant general.[1][Note 1] A major general typically commands division-sized units of 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers. Major general is equivalent to the two-star rank of rear admiral in the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
and is the highest permanent rank during peacetime in the uniformed services. Higher ranks are technically temporary ranks linked to specific positions, although virtually all officers who have been promoted to those ranks are approved to retire at their highest earned rank.Contents1 Statutory limits 2 Promotion, appointment, and tour length 3 Retirement 4 History4.1 U.S. Army 4.2 Confederate States Army 4.3 U.S. Marine Corps 4.4 U.S
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Army Of The Ohio
The Army of the Ohio
Army of the Ohio
was the name of two Union armies in the American Civil War. The first army became the Army of the Cumberland
Army of the Cumberland
and the second army was created in 1863.Contents1 History1.1 1st Army of the Ohio 1.2 2nd Army of the Ohio2 Commanders 3 Major battles and campaigns 4 Orders of Battle 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] 1st Army of the Ohio[edit] General Orders No. 97 appointed Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell
Don Carlos Buell
to command the Department of the Ohio. All the forces of the department were then organized into the Army of the Ohio, with Buell in command. Early in 1862, the army fought its first battle at Mill Springs, although only the 1st Division, commanded by Brig. Gen. George H. Thomas, was engaged
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United States House Committee On Armed Services
The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives
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Lawyer
A lawyer or attorney is a person who practices law, as an advocate, barrister, attorney, counselor, solicitor, not as a paralegal or charter executive secretary.[1] Working as a lawyer involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who hire lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies greatly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in only the most general terms.[2][3]Contents1 Terminology 2 Responsibilities2.1 Oral argument in the courts 2.2 Research and drafting of court papers 2.3 Advocacy (written and oral) in administrative hearings 2.4 Client intake and counseling (with regard to pending litigation) 2.5 Legal advice 2.6 Protecting intellectual property 2.7 Negotiating and drafting contracts 2.8 Conveyancing 2.9 Carrying out the intent of the deceased 2.10 Prosecution and defense of criminal suspects3 Educati
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Battle Of Shiloh
∼ 63,000 (estimated):[7]Army of the Tennessee: 44,894[8][9] Army of the Ohio: ∼ 17,918[10]40,335[11][12]Casualties and losses13,047[13][14] (1,754 killed;  8,408 wounded;  2,885 captured/missing)10,699[15][16] (1,728 killed;  8,012 wounded;  959 captured/missing)ShilohLocation within the state of Tennessee Show map of TennesseeShilohShiloh (the US) Show map of the USv t eFederal Penetration up the Cumberland and Tennessee
Tennessee
RiversFort Henry Fort Donelson Shiloh CorinthThe Battle of Shiloh
Battle of Shiloh
(also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing) was a battle in the Western Theater of the American Civil War, fought April 6–7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. A Union force known as the Army of the Tennessee
Army of the Tennessee
(Major General Ulysses S
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Levin Corbin Handy
Levin Corbin Handy
Levin Corbin Handy
(August 10, 1855[1] – March 26, 1932) was an American photographer who worked during the 19th and early 20th century. Civil War photographer Mathew Brady
Mathew Brady
was Handy's uncle by marriage, and Handy was apprenticed to him at age twelve. After a few years of working in Brady's studio, he was a skilled camera operator. Later, Handy became an independent photographer in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
In the 1880s, he formed a partnership with Samuel C. Chester; following that, he and Chester worked as partners with Brady. Handy shot individual portraits, and provided photographic and photoduplication services for United States
United States
Federal agencies. Between 1880 and 1896, he documented the construction of the Library of Congress's Thomas Jefferson Building.Levin Handy photograph of Confederate General Robert E
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Barge
A barge is a flat-bottomed ship, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. Some barges are not self-propelled and must be towed or pushed by towboats, canal barges or towed by draft animals on an adjacent towpath. Barges contended with the railway in the early Industrial Revolution, but were outcompeted in the carriage of high-value items due to the higher speed, falling costs and route flexibility of railways.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types 3 Modern use 4 Towed or otherwise unpowered barges in the United States 5 Image gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Barge
Barge
carrying recycling material on Deûle channel in Lambersart, France Barge
Barge
is attested from 1300, from Old French
Old French
barge, from Vulgar Latin barga. The word originally could refer to any small boat; the modern meaning arose around 1480
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Siege Of Corinth
Henry HalleckUlysses S. Grant George H. Thomas Don Carlos Buell John PopeP. G. T. BeauregardBraxton Bragg Earl Van DornUnits involvedArmy of the Tennessee Army of the Ohio Army of the MississippiArmy of Tennessee Army of the WestStrength120,000 65,000Casualties and losses1,000[2] 1,000[2]v t eFederal Penetration up the Cumberland and Tennessee RiversFort Henry Fort Donelson Shiloh CorinthMap of the Siege of Corinth
Siege of Corinth
Battlefield core and study areas by the American Battlefield Protection Program.The Siege of Corinth
Siege of Corinth
(also known as the First Battle of Corinth) was an American Civil War
American Civil War
engagement lasting from April 29 to May 30, 1862, in Corinth, Mississippi
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