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Jakelin De Mailly
The Battle of Cresson
Battle of Cresson
was a small battle, fought on 1 May 1187 at the springs of Cresson, or 'Ain Gozeh, near Nazareth. It was a prelude to the decisive defeat of the Kingdom of Jerusalem
Kingdom of Jerusalem
at the Battle of Hattin two months later.Contents1 Background 2 The battle 3 Aftermath 4 The problem of the sources 5 For succession of related campaigns see also 6 References 7 BibliographyBackground[edit] The political situation in Jerusalem was tense because of factional rivalries between two branches of the royal house. Raymond III of Tripoli, who had previously been regent for the kingdom, refused to accept Guy of Lusignan
Guy of Lusignan
as king, following the death of the child king, Baldwin V (Guy's stepson) the previous year
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Crusade
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish<
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Siege Of Jerusalem (1099)
Decisive Crusader victory[1] Jerusalem
Jerusalem
captured by the Crusaders Kingdom of Jerusalem
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Crusades
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish<
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Levant
 Cyprus  Israel  Iraq  Jordan  Lebanon  Palestine  Syria   Turkey
Turkey
(Hatay Province)Broader definition Egypt  Greece   Cyrenaica
Cyrenaica
(Libya)   Turkey
Turkey
(whole territory)Population 44,550,926[a]Demonym LevantineLanguages Levantine Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic, Armenian, Circassian, Greek, Kurdish, Ladino, Turkish, DomariTime Zones UTC+02:00 (EET) ( Turkey
Turkey
and Cyprus)Largest citiesDamascus Amman Aleppo Baghdad Beirut Gaza Jerusalem Tel AvivThe Levant
Levant
(/ləˈvænt/) is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in the Eastern Mediterranean. In its narrowest sense it is equivalent to the historical region of Syria
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First Crusade
CrusadersKingdom of FranceBlois Toulouse Boulogne Flanders Normandy Le Puy-en-Velay Vermandois BrittanyHoly Roman EmpireDuchy of Lower Lorraine Republic of GenoaSicily (Taranto) Byzantine Empire Armenian CiliciaMuslim forcesSeljuk Sultanate Danishmends Fatimid Caliphate Abbasid CaliphateCommanders and leadersImperial Contingent:Godfrey of Bouillon Baldwin of BoulogneSouthern French Contingent:Raymond IV of Toulouse Adhemar of Le PuyNorthern French Contingent:Hugh I of Vermandois Stephen II of Blois Robert II of Flanders Robert II of NormandyNorman-Italian ContingentBohemond of Taranto Tancred of Hauteville Richard of SalernoEastern Leaders:Alexios I Komnenos Tatikios Manuel Boutoumites Constantine of ArmeniaSeljuq Empire:Kilij Arslan I Yaghi-Siyan Kerbogha Duqaq Fakhr al-Mulk RadwanDanishmendsGhazi ibn DanishmendFatimidsIftikhar ad-Daula Al-Afdal ShahanshahStrengthCrusaders: ca
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Siege Of Xerigordos
A siege is a military blockade of a city, or fortress, with the intent of conquering by attrition, or a well-prepared assault. This derives from sedere, Latin
Latin
for "to sit".[1] Siege
Siege
warfare is a form of constant, low-intensity conflict characterized by one party holding a strong, static, defensive position. Consequently, an opportunity for negotiation between combatants is not uncommon, as proximity and fluctuating advantage can encourage diplomacy. A siege occurs when an attacker encounters a city or fortress that cannot be easily taken by a quick assault, and which refuses to surrender. Sieges involve surrounding the target to block the provision of supplies and the reinforcement or escape of troops (a tactic known as "investment"[2])
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Battle Of Civetot
Decisive Seljuk Turks
Seljuk Turks
victory.End of the People's CrusadeBelligerentsSeljuk Turks Crusading PeasantsCommanders and leadersKılıçarslan I Walter Sans-Avoir † Geoffrei BurelStrength5,000 20,000Casualties and losses50 17,000v t ePeople's CrusadeRoad To ConstantinopleMassacre of Rhineland JewsSiege of Xerigordos Battle of Civetotv t eCrusader battles in the
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Siege Of Nicaea
Crusaders: ~30,000 infantry ~4,200-4,500 cavalry [1] Byzantines: ~2,000 peltasts [2]Nicaean garrison: Unknown, but sizeable Kilij Arslan's relief force: ~10,000, mostly mounted archers [3]Casualties and lossesUnknown ~4000v t eCrusader battles in the Levant
Levant
(1096–1303)First CrusadeXerigordos Civetot Nicaea 1st Dorylaeum 1st Antioch Ma'arra Arqa 1st Jerusalem 1st AscalonPeriod post First CrusadeArsuf Melitene Mersivan 1st Heraclea 2nd Heraclea 1st Ramla 2nd Ramla 1st Tripoli Harran 3rd Ramla Artah Sidon 1st Shaizar Al-San
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Battle Of Dorylaeum (1097)
The Battle of Dorylaeum
Dorylaeum
took place during the First Crusade
First Crusade
on July 1, 1097, between the crusaders and the Seljuk Turks, near the city of Dorylaeum
Dorylaeum
in Anatolia.Contents1 Background 2 Battle 3 Aftermath 4 Notes 5 SourcesBackground[edit] The crusaders had left Nicaea
Nicaea
on June 26, with a deep distrust of the Byzantines, who had taken the city without their knowledge after a long siege
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Siege Of Antioch
Decisive Crusader–Byzantine victoryAntioch captured by the Crusaders Principality of Antioch is formedBelligerentsCrusaders  Byzantine EmpireSeljuk EmpireAntioch Damascus Homs Aleppo MosulCommanders and leadersBohemond of Taranto Raymond IV of Toulouse Adhemar of Le Puy Godfrey of Bouillon Robert II of Normandy Robert II of Flanders Stephen of Blois Hugh of Vermandois Eustace III of Boulogne Tancred of Hauteville Rainald III of Toul Gaston IV of Béarn Tatikios Yaghi-Siyan † Duqaq Toghtekin Janah ad-Dawla Fakhr al-Mulk Radwan Shams ad-Daulah Kerbogha Watthab-ibn-Mahmud Soqman ibn Ortoq Ahmad ibn-Marwan StrengthCrusaders: ~40,000 total at the start of the siege (includes non-combatants) ~20,000 during the second siege against Kerbogha[1] Byzantines: 2,000 light infantry and naval support Antiochene garrison: ~5000[2] Duqaq's relief force: ~10,000[3] Radwan's relief force: ~12,000[4] Kerbogha's relief force
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Siege Of Ma'arra
The Siege of Maarat, or Ma'arra, occurred in late 1098 in the city of Ma'arrat al-Numan, in what is modern-day Syria, during the First Crusade. It is infamous for the claims of widespread cannibalism displayed by the Crusaders.Contents1 Prologue 2 Siege 3 Cannibalism 4 March to Jerusalem 5 Legacy 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 External linksPrologue[edit] After the Crusaders, led by Raymond de Saint Gilles
Raymond de Saint Gilles
and Bohemond of Taranto, successfully besieged Antioch, they started to raid the surrounding countryside during the winter months. The Crusaders had been ineffective in assessing and protecting their supply lines, which led to widespread hunger and lack of proper equipment within the Crusader armies. In July 1098, Raymond Pilet, a knight in the army of Raymond de Saint Gilles, led an expedition against Maarat, an important city on the road south towards Damascus
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March From Antioch To Jerusalem During The First Crusade
Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(/dʒəˈruːsələm/; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‬  Yerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدس‎  al-Quds)[note 2] is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
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Battle Of Ascalon
Decisive Crusader victory[1]Fatimid army retreats back to Egypt End of the First CrusadeBelligerents Kingdom of Jerusalem  Fatimid CaliphateCommanders and leaders Godfrey of Bouillon Raymond IV of Toulouse Robert II of Normandy Robert II of Flanders Eustace III of Boulogne Tancred of Hauteville Gaston IV of Béarn al-Afdal Shahanshah [2][3]Strength10,2001,200 knights[4] 9,000 infantry[4] 20,000[4]Casualties and lossesLight[1] 12,700 killed[5]v t eCrusader battles in the Levant
Levant
(1096–1303)First Crusade
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Battle Of Arsuf
11,200 in total[2][3]10,000 infantry 1,200 heavy cavalry25,000 cavalry[4]Casualties and losses700 killed[5] (Itinerarium) 7,000 killed[6] (Itinerarium)v t eThird CrusadeIconium Acre Arsuf Jaffav t eAyyubid–Crusader War (1169–1192)Montgisard Marj Ayyun Jacob's Ford Belvoir Castle Al-Fule Kerak Cresson Hattin Jerusalem Tyre Acre Arsuf Jaffav t eCrusader battles in the Levant
Levant
(1096–1303)First CrusadeXerigordos Civetot Nicaea 1st Dorylaeum 1st Antioch Ma'arra Arqa 1st Jerusalem 1st Asca
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First Siege Of Arsuf
The first siege of Arsuf, originally Apollonia, took place in the First Crusade. Arsuf
Arsuf
was an ancient city in Judea
Judea
dating from the late Roman era, situated on a cliff above the Mediterranean Sea, about 21 miles south of Caesarea, now in Israel. The city fell to the Muslims in 640 and was fortified to protect against attacks by the Byzantine armies. Godfrey of Bouillon
Godfrey of Bouillon
attempted to capture the city in 1099, but failed for want of ships
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