HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Jacobus Angelus
Giacomo or Jacopo d'Angelo,[1] better known by his Latin
Latin
name Jacobus Angelus, was an Italian scholar and humanist during the Renaissance. Named for the village of Scarperia
Scarperia
in the Mugello in the Republic of Florence, he traveled to Venice where Manuel Palaeologus's ambassador Manuel Chrysoloras
Manuel Chrysoloras
was teaching Greek, the first such course in Italy for several centuries.[citation needed] Da Scarperia
Scarperia
returned with Chrysoloras to Constantinople
Constantinople
(Istanbul)—the first Florentine to do so—along with Guarino da Verona
[...More...]

"Jacobus Angelus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope Gregory IX
Pope
Pope
Gregory IX Latin: Gregorius IX (born Ugolino di Conti; c. 1145 or before 1170 – 22 August 1241), was Pope
Pope
from 19 March 1227 to his death in 1241. He is known for issuing the Decretales and instituting the Papal Inquisition, a mechanism that severely punished people accused of heresy, in response to the failures of the episcopal inquisitions established during the time of Pope
Pope
Lucius III through his papal bull Ad abolendam issued in 1184. The successor of Pope
Pope
Honorius III, he fully inherited the traditions of Pope
Pope
Gregory VII and of his cousin Pope
Pope
Innocent III, and zealously continued their policy of Papal supremacy.Contents1 Early life 2 Papacy 3 Struggle with Frederick II 4 See also 5 References 6 External links 7 Further studiesEarly life[edit] Ugolino (Hugh) was born in Anagni
[...More...]

"Pope Gregory IX" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Roberto De' Rossi
Roberto de' Rossi was an early humanist in Florence,[1] a follower of Coluccio Salutati
Coluccio Salutati
and, as the first pupil of Manuel Chrysoloras, one of the first Florentines to read Greek. Roberto de' Rossi was a wealthy patrician who never married and avoided public office but devoted his life to books and his studies in his house and garden in the Oltr'Arno district of Florence.[2] His translations of Aristotle and other classical Greek writers made them widely available to the Latin-reading public, but his modern claim to fame is as the tutor of Cosimo de' Medici, a role for which he was selected by Giovanni di Bicci
[...More...]

"Roberto De' Rossi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope Alexander V
Peter of Candia or Peter Phillarges (c. 1339 – May 3, 1410) as Alexander V (Latin: Alexander PP. V) (Italian: Alessandro V) was a nominal pope elected during the Western Schism
Western Schism
(1378–1417)
[...More...]

"Pope Alexander V" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle
(/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/;[3] Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs, pronounced [aristotélɛːs]; 384–322 BC)[n 1] was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece. Along with Plato, Aristotle
Aristotle
is considered the "Father of Western Philosophy", which inherited almost its entire lexicon from his teachings, including problems and methods of inquiry, so influencing almost all forms of knowledge. Little is known for certain about his life. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle
Aristotle
was a child, and he was brought up by a guardian. At seventeen or eighteen years of age, he joined Plato's Academy
Plato's Academy
in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c
[...More...]

"Aristotle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plato
Plato
Plato
(/ˈpleɪtoʊ/;[a][1] Greek: Πλάτων[a] Plátōn, pronounced [plá.tɔːn] in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423[b] – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece
Classical Greece
and the founder of the Academy
Academy
in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world
[...More...]

"Plato" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paolo Uccello
Paolo Uccello
Paolo Uccello
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈpaːolo utˈtʃɛllo]; 1397 – 10 December 1475), born Paolo di Dono, was an Italian painter and mathematician who was notable for his pioneering work on visual perspective in art. In his book Lives of the Artists Giorgio Vasari wrote that Uccello was obsessed by his interest in perspective and would stay up all night in his study trying to grasp the exact vanishing point. While his contemporaries used perspective to narrate different or succeeding stories, Uccello used perspective to create a feeling of depth in his paintings. His best known works are the three paintings representing the battle of San Romano, which were wrongly entitled the "Battle of Sant' Egidio of 1416" for a long period of time.[1] Paolo worked in the Late Gothic tradition, emphasizing colour and pageantry rather than the classical realism that other artists were pioneering
[...More...]

"Paolo Uccello" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leonardo Bruni
Leonardo Bruni
Leonardo Bruni
(or Leonardo Aretino) (c. 1370 – March 9, 1444) was an Italian humanist, historian and statesman, often recognized as the most important humanist historian of the early Renaissance.[1] He has been called the first modern historian.[2] He was the earliest person to write using the three-period view of history: Antiquity, Middle Ages, and Modern. The dates Bruni used to define the periods are not exactly what modern historians use today, but he laid the conceptual groundwork for a tripartite division of history.Contents1 Biography 2 Significance 3 Bibliography 4 Notes 5 References 6 External links6.1 Latin texts online 6.2 German texts onlineBiography[edit] Leonardo Bruni
Leonardo Bruni
was born in Arezzo, Tuscany
Tuscany
circa 1370
[...More...]

"Leonardo Bruni" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medieval Greek
Medieval Greek, also known as Byzantine Greek, is the stage of the Greek language
Greek language
between the end of Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
in the 5th–6th centuries and the end of the Middle Ages, conventionally dated to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople
Constantinople
in 1453. From the 7th century onwards, Greek was the only language of administration and government in the Byzantine Empire. This stage of language is thus described as Byzantine Greek
[...More...]

"Medieval Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Robert Grosseteste
Robert Grosseteste
Robert Grosseteste
(/ˈɡroʊstɛst/ GROHS-test; Latin: Robertus Grosseteste; c. 1175 – 9 October 1253)[n 1] was an English statesman, scholastic philosopher, theologian, scientist and Bishop of Lincoln. He was born of humble parents at Stradbroke
Stradbroke
in Suffolk. Upon his death, he was almost universally revered as a saint in England, but attempts to procure a formal canonization failed
[...More...]

"Robert Grosseteste" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Petrarch
Francesco Petrarca (Italian: [franˈtʃesko peˈtrarka]; July 20, 1304 – July 20, 1374), commonly anglicized as Petrarch (/ˈpiːtrɑːrk, ˈpɛ-/), was an Italian scholar and poet in Renaissance
Renaissance
Italy, who was one of the earliest humanists. His rediscovery of Cicero's letters is often credited with initiating the 14th-century Renaissance
[...More...]

"Petrarch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Manuel II Palaiologos
Claimants: House of Kastrioti
House of Kastrioti
(defunct) House of Rurik (defunct)Palaiologan dynastyChronologyMichael VIII 1259–1282with Andronikos II as co-emperor, 1261–1282Andronikos II 1282–1328with Michael IX (1294–1320) and Andronikos III (1321–1328) as co-emperorsAndronikos III 1328–1341John V 1341–1391with John VI Kantakouzenos
John VI Kantakouzenos
(1347–1354), Matthew Kantakouzenos (1342–1357) and Manuel II (1373–1391) as co-emperorsUsurpation of Andronikos IV 1376–1379Usurpation of John VII 1390Manuel II 1391–1425with Andronikos V (1403–1407) and John VIII (ca
[...More...]

"Manuel II Palaiologos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Homer
Homer
Homer
(/ˈhoʊmər/; Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad
Iliad
is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy
Troy
by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon
Agamemnon
and the warrior Achilles
Achilles
lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey
Odyssey
focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia
Anatolia
in present-day Turkey
[...More...]

"Homer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Classical Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Classical Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archbishop Of Milan
The Archdiocese of Milan
Milan
(Italian: Arcidiocesi di Milano; Latin: Archidioecesis Mediolanensis) is a metropolitan see of the Catholic Church in Italy
Italy
which covers the areas of Milan, Monza, Lecco
Lecco
and Varese. It has long maintained its own Latin liturgical rite, the Ambrosian rite, which is still used in the greater part of the diocesan territory
[...More...]

"Archbishop Of Milan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.