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JWH-133
JWH-133
JWH-133
is a potent selective CB2 receptor agonist with a Ki of 3.4nM and selectivity of around 200x for CB2 over CB1 receptors. It was discovered by and named after, John W. Huffman. JWH-133, alongside WIN 55,212-2
WIN 55,212-2
and HU-210, is responsible for preventing the inflammation caused by Amyloid beta
Amyloid beta
proteins involved in Alzheimer's Disease, in addition to preventing cognitive impairment and loss of neuronal markers[citation needed]
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IUPAC Nomenclature Of Chemistry
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
(IUPAC) has published four sets of rules to standardize chemical nomenclature. There are two main areas: IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry
IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry
(Red Book) IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry
IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry
(Blue Book)This chemistry-related article is a stub
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John W. Huffman
John William Huffman (born 1932) is a professor emeritus of organic chemistry at Clemson University
Clemson University
who first synthesised many novel cannabinoids.[1] His research, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, was focused on making a drug to target endocannabinoid receptors in the body.[2]Contents1 Cannabinoid
Cannabinoid
research 2 Law enforcement 3 External links 4 See also 5 References Cannabinoid
Cannabinoid
research[edit] Beginning in 1984, Huffman and his team of researchers began developing cannabinoid compounds to aid in research of multiple sclerosis, HIV/AIDS, and chemotherapy. Over the course of twenty years, Huffman and his team developed 450 synthetic cannabinoid compounds which were used to test the effect of cannabinoid receptors in the brain and other organs
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Epigallocatechin Gallate
Epigallocatechin
Epigallocatechin
gallate (EGCG), also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is the ester of epigallocatechin and gallic acid, and is a type of catechin. EGCG, the most abundant catechin in tea, is a polyphenol under basic research for its potential to affect human health and disease
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Echinacea
Brauneria Necker ex T.C.Porter & Britton Helichroa Raf. Echinacea
Echinacea
/ˌɛkɪˈneɪʃiə/[1] is a genus, or group of herbaceous flowering plants in the daisy family. The Echinacea
Echinacea
genus has nine species, which are commonly called coneflowers. They are found only in eastern and central North America, where they grow in moist to dry prairies and open wooded areas. They have large, showy heads of composite flowers, blooming from early to late summer. The generic name is derived from the Greek word ἐχῖνος (ekhinos), meaning "hedgehog," due to the spiny central disk. These flowering plants and their parts have different uses. Some species are cultivated in gardens for their showy flowers. Echinacea purpurea
Echinacea purpurea
is used in folk medicine.[2] Two of the species, E. tennesseensis and E
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CAS Registry Number
A CAS Registry Number,[1] also referred to as CASRN or CAS Number, is a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) to every chemical substance described in the open scientific literature (currently including all substances described from 1957 through the present, plus some substances from the early or mid 1900s), including organic and inorganic compounds, minerals, isotopes, alloys and nonstructurable materials (UVCBs, of unknown, variable composition, or biological origin).[2] The Registry maintained by CAS is an authoritative collection of disclosed chemical substance information. It currently identifies more than 129 million organic and inorganic substances and 67 million protein and DNA sequences,[3] plus additional information about each substance
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Alabama
As of 2010[1]English 95.1% Spanish 3.1%Demonym Alabamian[2]Capital MontgomeryLargest city BirminghamLargest metro Birmingham metropolitan areaArea Ranked 30th • Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km2) • Width 190 miles (305 km) • Length 330 miles (531 km) • % water 3.20 • Latitude 30° 11′ N to 35° N • Longitude 84° 53′ W to 88° 28′ WPopulation Ranked 24th • Total 4,863,300 (2016 est.)[3] • Density 94.7 (2011 est.)/sq mi  (36.5 (2011 est.)/km2) Ranked 27th • Median household income $44,509[4] (47th)Elevation • Highest point Mount Cheaha[5][6][7] 2,413 ft (735.5 m) • Mean 500 ft  (150 m) • Lowest point Gulf of Mexico[6] Sea levelBefore statehood
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Madrid
Madrid
Madrid
(/məˈdrɪd/, Spanish: [maˈðɾið], locally [maˈðɾi(θ)]) is the capital of Spain
Spain
and the largest municipality in both the Community of Madrid
Community of Madrid
and Spain
Spain
as a whole. The city has almost 3.166 million[4] inhabitants with a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.5 million
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Neurotoxicity
Neurotoxicity is a form of toxicity in which a biological, chemical, or physical agent produces an adverse effect on the structure or function of the central and/or peripheral nervous system.[1] It occurs when exposure to substance – specifically, a neurotoxin – alters the normal activity of the nervous system in such a way as to cause permanent or reversible damage to nervous tissue.[1] This can eventually disrupt or even kill neurons, which are cells that transmit and process signals in the brain and other parts of the nervous system. Neurotoxicity can result from organ transplants, radiation treatment, certain drug therapies (e.g., substances used in chemotherapy), recreational drug use, and exposure to heavy metals, pesticides,[2][3] certain industrial cleaning solvents, and certain naturally occurring substances. Symptoms may appear immediately after exposure or be delayed
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Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease
(AD), also referred to simply as Alzheimer's, is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that usually starts slowly and worsens over time.[1][2] It is the cause of 60% to 70% of cases of dementia.[1][2] The most common early symptom is difficulty in remembering recent events (short-term memory loss).[1] As the disease advances, symptoms can include problems with language, disorientation (including easily getting lost), mood swings, loss of motivation, not managing self care, and behavioural issues.[1][2] As a
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Amyloid Beta
Amyloid
Amyloid
beta (Aβ or Abeta) denotes peptides of 36–43 amino acids that are crucially involved in Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease
as the main component of the amyloid plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer patients.[2] The peptides derive from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is cleaved by beta secretase and gamma secretase to yield Aβ. Aβ molecules can aggregate to form flexible soluble oligomers which may exist in several forms. It is now believed that certain misfolded oligomers (known as "seeds") can induce other Aβ molecules to also take the misfolded oligomeric form, leading to a chain reaction akin to a prion infection
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Microglia
Microglia
Microglia
are a type of neuroglia (glial cell) located throughout the brain and spinal cord.[1] Microglia
Microglia
account for 10–15% of all cells found within the brain.[2] As the resident macrophage cells, they act as the first and main form of active immune defence in the central ner
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Dissociation Constant
In chemistry, biochemistry, and pharmacology, a dissociation constant ( K d displaystyle K_ d ) is a specific type of equilibrium constant that measures the propensity of a larger object to separate (dissociate) reversibly into smaller components, as when a complex falls apart into its component molecules, or when a salt splits up into its component ions. The dissociation constant is the inverse of the association constant
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JSmol
Jmol
Jmol
is computer software for molecular modelling chemical structures in 3-dimensions.[2] Jmol
Jmol
returns a 3D representation of a molecule that may be used as a teaching tool,[3] or for research e.g., in chemistry and biochemistry. It is written in the programming language Java, so it can run on the operating systems Windows, macOS, Linux, and Unix, if Java is installed. It is free and open-source software released under a GNU Lesser General Public License
GNU Lesser General Public License
(LGPL) version 2.0. A standalone application and a software development kit (SDK) exist that can be integrated into other Java applications, such as Bioclipse and Taverna. A popular feature is an applet that can be integrated into web pages to display molecules in a variety of ways
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Guide To Pharmacology
The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY is an open-access website, acting as a portal to information on the biological targets of licensed drugs and other small molecules. The Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (with GtoPdb being the standard abbreviation) is developed as a joint venture between the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS). This replaces and expands upon the original 2009 IUPHAR Database (standard abbreviation IUPHAR-DB) . The Guide to PHARMACOLOGY aims to provide a concise overview of all pharmacological targets, accessible to all members of the scientific and clinical communities and the interested public, with links to details on a selected set of targets
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ChemSpider
ChemSpider
ChemSpider
is a database of chemicals. ChemSpider
ChemSpider
is owned by the Royal Society of Chemistry.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13]Contents1 Database 2 Crowdsourcing 3 Searching 4 Chemistry document mark-up 5 History 6 Services6.1 SyntheticPages 6.2 Open PHACTS7 See also 8 ReferencesDatabase[edit] The database contains information on more than 63 million molecules from over 280 data sources including:EPA DSSTox[14][15] U.S
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