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Israel Aerospace Industries
Israel
Israel
Aerospace
Aerospace
Industries (Hebrew: התעשייה האווירית לישראל ha-ta'asiya ha-avirit le-yisra'el) or IAI (תע"א) is Israel's prime aerospace and aviation manufacturer, producing aerial and astronautic systems for both military and civilian usage. It has 16,000 employees as of 2013. IAI is wholly owned by the government of Israel. IAI designs and builds civil aircraft, drones, fighter aircraft, missile, avionics, and space-based systems. Although IAI's main focus is aviation and high-tech electronics, it also manufactures military systems for ground and naval forces
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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147 Squadron (Israel)
147 Squadron, often referred to as the Flying Ibex[1] or Goring Ram[2] squadron, is a former unit of the Israeli Air Force. Fielding IAF Flight Academy aircraft, it flew the Boeing-Stearman Kaydet during the 1956 Suez Crisis and the Fouga Magister during the 1967 Six Day War, in the course of which it suffered six fatalities. Between 1978 and 1986 it flew the A-4 Skyhawk.Contents1 Formation 2 Six Day War 3 Flying the A-4 Skyhawk 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksFormation[edit] In January 1953 the IAF formed the flight academy's fleet of Stearmans into a reserve liaison and surveillance unit, to be activated in times of emergency. Seconded to 100 Squadron, the unit was initially designated 1000 Squadron, but was redesignated 147 Squadron on January 1, 1955
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Missile
In modern language, a missile is a self-propelled system, as opposed to an unguided self-propelled munition, referred to as a rocket (although these too can also be guided). Missiles have four system components: targeting or missile guidance, flight system, engine, and warhead. Missiles come in types adapted for different purposes: surface-to-surface and air-to-surface missiles (ballistic, cruise, anti-ship, anti-tank, etc.), surface-to-air missiles (and anti-ballistic), air-to-air missiles, and anti-satellite weapons
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Government-owned Corporation
A state-owned enterprise (SOE) is a business enterprise where the state has significant control through full, majority, or significant minority ownership.[1] Defining characteristics of SOEs are their distinct legal form and operation in commercial affairs and activities. While they may also have public policy objectives (e.g., a state railway company may aim to make transportation more accessible), SOEs should be differentiated from government agencies or state entities established to pursue purely nonfinancial objectives.[2]Contents1 Terminology 2 Sectors 3 Effects 4 SOEs around the world4.1 Europe 4.2 Middle East5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Sources7 Further readingTerminology[edit] The terminology around the term state-owned enterprise is murky
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Astronautics
Astronautics
Astronautics
(or cosmonautics) is the theory and practice of navigation beyond Earth's atmosphere. The term astronautics (originally astronautique in French) was coined in the 1920s by J.-H. Rosny, president of the Goncourt academy, in analogy with aeronautics.[1] Because there is a degree of technical overlap between the two fields, the term aerospace is often used to describe both at once. In 1930, Robert Esnault-Pelterie
Robert Esnault-Pelterie
published the first book on the new research field.[2] As with aeronautics, the restrictions of mass, temperatures, and external forces require that applications in space survive extreme conditions: high-grade vacuum, the radiation bombardment of interplanetary space and the magnetic belts of low Earth orbit
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High-tech
High technology, often abbreviated to high tech (adjective forms high-technology, high-tech or hi-tech) is technology that is at the cutting edge: the most advanced technology available.[1] The opposite of high tech is low technology, referring to simple, often traditional or mechanical technology; for example, a slide rule is a low-tech calculating device. The phrase was used in a 1958 The New York Times
The New York Times
story advocating "atomic energy" for Europe: "... Western Europe, with its dense population and its high technology ...."[2] Robert Metz used the term in a financial column in 1969: "Arthur H
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Naval
A navy or maritime force is the branch of a nation's armed forces principally designated for naval and amphibious warfare; namely, lake-borne, riverine, littoral, or ocean-borne combat operations and related functions. It includes anything conducted by surface ships, amphibious ships, submarines, and seaborne aviation, as well as ancillary support, communications, training, and other fields. The strategic offensive role of a navy is projection of force into areas beyond a country's shores (for example, to protect sea-lanes, ferry troops, or attack other navies, ports, or shore installations). The strategic defensive purpose of a navy is to frustrate seaborne projection-of-force by enemies. The strategic task of the navy also may incorporate nuclear deterrence by use of submarine-launched ballistic missiles
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V-tail
In aircraft, a V-tail
V-tail
or Vee-tail (sometimes called a Butterfly tail[1] or Rudlicki's V-tail[2]) is an unconventional arrangement of the tail control surfaces that replaces the traditional fin and horizontal surfaces with two surfaces set in a V-shaped configuration when viewed from the front or rear of the aircraft
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Six Day War
Egypt  Syria  Jordan Iraq[1]  Lebanon[2]Supported by:  Algeria  Kuwait Libya  Morocco  Pakistan[3] PLO Sudan  TunisiaCommanders and leaders Levi Eshkol Moshe Dayan Yitzhak Rabin Uzi
Uzi
Narkiss Motta Gur Israel
Israel
Tal Mordechai Hod Yeshayahu Gavish Ari
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Jordan
The Hashemite
Hashemite
Kingdom of Jordan المملكة الأردنية الهاشمية (Arabic) Al-Mamlakah Al-Urdunnīyah Al-HāshimīyahFlagCoat of armsMotto: "God, Country, King" الله، الوطن ، الملك" "Allah, Al-Waṭan, Al-Malik"[1]Anthem: The Royal Anthem of Jordan السلام الملكي الأردني Al-Salam Al-Malaki Al-UrdunniCapital and largest city Amman 31°57′N 35°56′E / 31.950°N 35.933°E / 31.950; 35.933Official languages ArabicEthnic groups98% Arab 1% Circassians 1% ArmeniansR
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Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly known as a drone, is an aircraft without a human pilot aboard. UAVs are a component of an unmanned aircraft system (UAS); which include a UAV, a ground-based controller, and a system of communications between the two. The flight of UAVs may operate with various degrees of autonomy: either under remote control by a human operator or autonomously by onboard computers.[1] Compared to manned aircraft, UAVs were originally used for missions too "dull, dirty or dangerous"[2] for humans. While they originated mostly in military applications, their use is rapidly expanding to commercial, scientific, recreational, agricultural, and other applications,[3] such as policing, peacekeeping,[4] and surveillance, product deliveries, aerial photography, agriculture, smuggling,[5] and drone racing
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West Bank
The West Bank (Arabic: الضفة الغربية‎ aḍ-Ḍiffah l-Ġarbiyyah; Hebrew: הגדה המערבית‎, HaGadah HaMa'aravit) is a landlocked territory near the Mediterranean coast of Western Asia, the bulk of it now under Israeli control,[3] or else under joint Israeli-Palestinian Authority control. The final status of the entire area is yet to be determined by the parties concerned.[4] The West Bank shares boundaries (demarcated by the Jordanian-Israeli armistice of 1949) to the west, north, and south with Israel, and to the east, across the Jordan River, with Jordan
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France–Israel Relations
France–Israel relations refers to the bilateral foreign relations between France and Israel. France has an embassy in Tel Aviv and a consulate-general in Jerusalem. Israel has an embassy in Paris and a consulate-general in Marseille. After the Israeli Declaration of Independence in 1948 and in the early 1950s, France and Israel maintained close political and military ties. France was Israel's main weapons supplier until its withdrawal from Algeria in 1962. After the Six-Day War in June 1967, Charles de Gaulle's government imposed an arms embargo on the region, mostly affecting Israel.[1] Under François Mitterrand in the early 1980s, French–Israeli relations improved greatly
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Yom Kippur War
Israeli military victory[22]Political gains for Egypt
Egypt
and Israel[23] 1978 Camp David
Camp David
AccordsTerritorial changesThe Egyptian army occupied the eastern coast of the
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Dassault Mirage III
The Dassault Mirage III
Dassault Mirage III
(French pronunciation: ​[miʁaʒ]) is a family of single-seat, single-engine, fighter aircraft developed and manufactured by French aircraft company Dassault Aviation. It was the first Western European combat aircraft to exceed Mach 2 in horizontal flight.[3] During 1952, the French government issued its specification, calling for a lightweight, all-weather interceptor. Amongst the respondents were Dassault with their design, initially known as the MD.550 Mystère-Delta and later renamed as the Mirage I. Following favourable flight testing held during 1955, in which speeds of up to Mach 1.6 were attained, it was decided that a larger follow-on aircraft would be required to bear the necessary equipment and payloads
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