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Isle Of Youth
Coordinates: 21°45′N 82°51′W / 21.750°N 82.850°W / 21.750; -82.850 (Isla de la Juventud)Isla de la Juventud Special
Special
Municipality of CubaCoat of armsCountry CubaCapital Nueva GeronaArea[1] • Total 2,419 km2 (934 sq mi)Population (December 31, 2010)[1] • Total 86,420 • Density 36/km2 (93/sq mi)Time zone EST (UTC-5)Area code(s) +53-061Satellite image of the islandIsla de la Juventud[2] (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈizla ðe la xuβenˈtuð]; English: Isle of Youth) is the second-largest Cuban island and the seventh-largest island in the West Indies
West Indies
(after Cuba itself, Hispaniola, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, and Andros Island). The island was called the Isle of Pines (Spanish: Isla de Pinos) until 1978
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Cuban War Of Independence
Cuban victoryAmerican Intervention; Expulsion of the Spanish colonial government during Spanish–American War
Spanish–American War
(1898). Treaty of Paris United States
United States
Military Government in Cuba Cuban independenceBelligerents Spain Spanish Cuba Spanish Philippines Cuban nationalists United StatesCommanders and leaders Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías Ramón Blanco Valeriano Weyler Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Máximo Gómez Calixto García José Martí
José Martí
† Antonio Maceo † Nelson A. Miles William Shafter George Dewey William T
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Pirate
Piracy
Piracy
is an act of robbery or criminal violence by ship or boat-borne attackers upon another ship or a coastal area, typically with the goal of stealing cargo and other valuable items or properties. Those who engage in acts of piracy are called pirates. The earliest documented instances of piracy were in the 14th century BC, when the Sea Peoples, a group of ocean raiders, attacked the ships of the Aegean and Mediterranean
Mediterranean
civilizations. Narrow channels which funnel shipping into predictable routes have long created opportunities for piracy,[1] as well as for privateering and commerce raiding
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English Literature
This article is focused on English-language literature rather than the literature of England, so that it includes writers from Scotland, Wales, and the whole of Ireland, as well as literature in English from countries of the former British Empire, including the United States. However, until the early 19th century, it only deals with the literature of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Ireland. It does not include literature written in the other languages of Britain. The English language
English language
has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years.[1] The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the fifth century, are called Old English
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Treasure Island
Treasure
Treasure
Island is an adventure novel by author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of "buccaneers and buried gold". Its influence is enormous on popular perceptions of pirates, including such elements as treasure maps marked with an "X", schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen bearing parrots on their shoulders.[1] Treasure
Treasure
Island was originally considered a coming-of-age story and is noted for its atmosphere, characters, and action. It is one of the most frequently dramatized of all novels. It was originally serialized in the children's magazine Young Folks between 1881 through 1882 under the title Treasure
Treasure
Island, or the mutiny of the Hispaniola, credited to the pseudonym "Captain George North"
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Robert Louis Stevenson
Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894) was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist, musician and travel writer. His most famous works are Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and A Child's Garden of Verses. Stevenson was a literary celebrity during his lifetime, and now ranks as the 26th most translated author in the world.[1] His works have been admired by many other writers, including Jorge Luis Borges, Bertolt Brecht, Marcel Proust, Arthur Conan Doyle, Henry James, Cesare Pavese, Emilio Salgari, Ernest Hemingway, Rudyard Kipling, Jack London, Vladimir Nabokov,[2] J. M. Barrie,[3] and G. K
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Peter And Wendy
Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up or Peter and Wendy
Peter and Wendy
is J. M. Barrie's most famous work, in the form of a 1904 play and a 1911 novel. Both versions tell the story of Peter Pan, a mischievous yet innocent little boy who can fly, and has many adventures on the island of Neverland
Neverland
that is inhabited by mermaids, fairies, Native Americans and pirates. Peter has many stories involving Wendy Darling
Wendy Darling
and her two brothers, his fairy Tinker Bell, the Lost Boys, and the pirate Captain Hook. The play and novel were inspired by Barrie's friendship with the Llewelyn Davies family. Barrie continued to revise the play for years after its debut until publication of the play script in 1928. The play debuted in London
London
on 27 December 1904 with Nina Boucicault, daughter of playwright Dion Boucicault, in the title role
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J. M. Barrie
Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, OM (/ˈbæri/; 9 May 1860 – 19 June 1937) was a Scottish novelist and playwright, best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan. He was born and educated in Scotland
Scotland
but moved to London, where he wrote a number of successful novels and plays. There he met the Llewelyn Davies boys, who inspired him to write about a baby boy who has magical adventures in Kensington Gardens
Kensington Gardens
(included in The Little White Bird), then to write Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up, a "fairy play" about an ageless boy and an ordinary girl named Wendy
Wendy
who have adventures in the fantasy setting of Neverland. Although he continued to write successfully, Peter Pan
Peter Pan
overshadowed his other work, and is credited with popularising the name Wendy.[1] Barrie unofficially adopted the Davies boys following the deaths of their parents
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Canoe
A canoe is a lightweight narrow vessel, typically pointed at both ends and open on top, propelled by one or more seated or kneeling paddlers facing the direction of travel using a single-bladed paddle.[1] In International Canoe Federation
International Canoe Federation
nomenclature used in some European countries such as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
the term canoe refers to kayaks,[2] while canoes are called Canadian canoes. Canoes are professionally used for transport of people and materials all over the world. Besides canoes are widely used for pleasure racing, whitewater canoeing, touring and camping, freestyle, and general recreation. The intended use of the canoe dictates its hull shape and length and construction material. Historically, canoes were dugouts or made of bark on a wood frame,[3] but construction materials evolved to canvas on a wood frame, then to aluminum
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American Crocodile
The American crocodile
American crocodile
( Crocodylus
Crocodylus
acutus) is a species of crocodilian found in the Neotropics. It is the most widespread of the four extant species of crocodiles from the Americas. Populations occur from the Atlantic
Atlantic
and Pacific
Pacific
coasts of southern Mexico
Mexico
to South America
South America
as far as Peru
Peru
and Venezuela
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Spanish–American War
American victoryTreaty of Paris of 1898Territorial changes Spain
Spain
relinquishes sovereignty over Cuba, cedes Puerto Rico, Guam
Guam
and the Philippine Islands
Philippine Islands
to the United States
United States
for $20 millionBelligerents United States Cuban revolutionaries[a] Filipino revolutionaries[a] Spain Cuba Spanish East Indies Puerto RicoCommanders and leaders William McKinley Nelson A. Miles Theodore Roosevelt William R. Shafter George Dewey William Sampson Wesley Merritt Joseph Wheeler Charles D
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Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of Spain Reino de España  (Spanish)6 other official names[a][b]Aragonese: Reino d'EspanyaAsturian: Reinu d'EspañaBasque: Espainiako ErresumaCatalan: Regne d'EspanyaGalician: Reino de EspañaOccitan: Reiaume d'EspanhaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Plus Ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March"Location of  Spain  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Madrid 40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national language Spanish[c]Co-official languages in certain autonomous communities Catalan Galician Basque OccitanEthnic groups (2015)89.9% Spanish 10.1% othersReligi
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Provinces Of Cuba
Administratively, Cuba
Cuba
is divided into 15 provinces and a special municipality that's not included in any province. The last modification was approved in August 2010 (by the Cuban National Assembly), splitting Havana
Havana
province into two new provinces: Artemisa (which incorporates the three eastern municipalities of the neighbour Pinar del Río) and Mayabeque. The new provinces started functioning from January 1, 2011
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Treaty Of Paris (1898)
The Treaty of Paris
Paris
of 1898 was an agreement made in 1898 that involved Spain
Spain
relinquishing nearly all of the remaining Spanish Empire, especially Cuba, and ceding Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines
Philippines
to the United States. The cession of the Philippines involved a payment of $20 million from the United States
United States
to Spain.[1] The treaty was signed on December 10, 1898, and ended the Spanish–American War. The Treaty of Paris
Paris
came into effect on April 11, 1899, when the documents of ratification were exchanged.[2] The Treaty of Paris
Paris
marked the end of the Spanish Empire
Spanish Empire
(apart from some small holdings in North Africa). It marked the beginning of the age of the United States
United States
as a world power
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Platt Amendment
On March 2, 1901, the Platt Amendment
Platt Amendment
was passed as part of the 1901 Army Appropriations Bill.[1] It stipulated seven conditions for the withdrawal of United States
United States
troops remaining in Cuba
Cuba
at the end of the Spanish–American War, and an eighth condition that Cuba
Cuba
sign a treaty accepting these seven conditions. It defined the terms of Cuban–U.S
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