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Island Platform
An island platform (also center platform, centre platform) is a station layout arrangement where a single platform is positioned between two tracks within a railway station, tram stop or transitway interchange. Island platforms are popular on twin-track routes due to pragmatic and cost-effective reasons. They are also useful within larger stations where local and express services for the same direction of travel can be provided from opposite sides of the same platform thereby simplifying transfers between the two tracks. An alternative arrangement is to position side platforms on either side of the tracks.Contents1 Layout 2 Advantages and tradeoffs 3 Examples 4 Unused sides of island platforms 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 ReferencesLayout[edit]Island platformLegendTwo tracks and one island platformThis section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (March 2017)The historical use of island platforms depends greatly upon the location
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Beecroft Railway Station
Beecroft railway station is located on the Main Northern line, serving the Sydney suburb of Beecroft. It is served by Sydney Trains T1 Northern Line services.Contents1 History 2 Platforms and services 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The original Beecroft station opened on 17 September 1886 approximately adjacent to the current Beecroft tennis courts, relocating north to its present site on 7 March 1892.[1][2] The disused down platform was demolished in the early 1990s
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Loading Gauge
A loading gauge defines the maximum height and width for railway vehicles and their loads to ensure safe passage through bridges, tunnels and other structures.[1] Classification systems vary between different countries and gauges may vary across a network, even if the track gauge remains constant.Contents1 Overview1.1 Out of gauge2 History 3 Standard loading gauges for standard track gauge lines3.1 International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
(UIC) Gauge 3.2 Europe
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Chicago Transit Authority
Bus: 872,090, Rail: 787,430 Total: 1.66 million (June 2015)Fuel type Diesel, Diesel-electric hybridOperator SelfChief executive Dorval R. Carter, Jr.[1]Website http://www.transitchicago.comThe Chicago
Chicago
Transit Authority (CTA; stylized as cta), is the operator of mass transit in Chicago, Illinois
Illinois
and some of its surrounding suburbs, including the trains of the Chicago
Chicago
"L" and CTA bus service. The CTA is an Illinois
Illinois
independent governmental agency[2] that started operations on October 1, 1947 upon the purchase and combination of the transportation assets of the Chicago
Chicago
Rapid Transit Company and the Chicago
Chicago
Surface Lines streetcar system
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Red Line (CTA)
The Red Line, sometimes known as the Howard-Dan Ryan Line or the North-South Line, is a rapid transit line in Chicago, run by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) as part of the Chicago "L" system. It is the busiest line on the "L" system, with an average of 251,813 passengers boarding each weekday in 2012.[1] The route is 23.4 miles (37.7 km) long with a total of 33 stations, from Howard station in Rogers Park on the north side, through the State Street subway and to 95th/Dan Ryan in Roseland on the south side. Like the Blue Line, the Red Line runs 24 hours a day, 365 days a year; it is one of only six mass-transit rail lines in the United States to do so (the others being the PATCO Speedline, Staten Island Railway, the Green Line of the Minneapolis-St. Paul METRO, the PATH lines, and the New York City Subway)
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Purple Line (CTA)
The Purple
Purple
Line (or the Evanston Line) of the Chicago
Chicago
Transit Authority is a 3.9-mile (6.3 km) route on the northernmost section of the Chicago "L"
Chicago "L"
rapid transit system. Normally, it extends south from Linden Avenue in Wilmette, passing through Evanston to Howard Street, on Chicago's north side. In 2016, the average weekday boardings on the Purple
Purple
Line was 10,187. The Purple
Purple
Line operates Mondays to Thursdays 4:25 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., Fridays, 4:30 a.m. to 2:10 a.m., Saturdays 5:05 a.m. to 2:15 a.m. and Sundays 6:05 a.m. to 1:45 a.m. During weekday rush hours (5:20 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. and 2:30 p.m
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IRT Flushing Line
The IRT Flushing Line
IRT Flushing Line
is a rapid transit route of the New York City Subway system, operated as part of the A Division. Originally an Interborough Rapid Transit Company-operated route, the Flushing Line, as originally built, ran from Flushing, Queens, to Times Square, Manhattan; a western extension was built to Hudson Yards in western Manhattan, and the line now stretches from Flushing to Chelsea, Manhattan. It carries trains of the 7 local service, as well as the express <7> during rush hours in the peak direction.[2] It is the only A Division line to serve Queens. It is shown in the color purple on station signs, the official subway map, internal route maps in R188 cars, and route signs on the front and sides of R62A subway cars. Before the line was opened all the way to Flushing in 1928, it was known as the Corona Line or Woodside and Corona Line
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IND Eighth Avenue Line
The IND Eighth Avenue Line
IND Eighth Avenue Line
is a rapid transit line in New York City, United States, and is part of the B Division of the New York City Subway. Opened in 1932, it was the first line of the Independent Subway System (IND), and the Eighth Avenue Subway name was also applied by New Yorkers to the entire IND system.[4][5][6] Most of the line has four tracks, with one local and one express track in each direction, except for the extreme north and south ends, where only the two express tracks continue. The line is signaled as Line "A", with tracks A1, A3, A4, and A2 from west to east,[7] running from approximately 800 at the south end[8] to 1540 at the north end (measured in feet).[9][10] The line runs from 207th Street in Inwood south to an interlocking south of High Street in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Heights, including large sections under St. Nicholas Avenue, Central Park West, and Eighth Avenue
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1939 World's Fair
The 1939–40 New York World's Fair, which covered the 1,216 acres (492 ha) of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park (also the location of the 1964–1965 New York World's Fair), was the second most expansive American world's fair of all time, exceeded only by St. Louis's Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904. Many countries around the world participated in it, and over 44 million people attended its exhibits in two seasons.[2] It was the first exposition to be based on the future, with an opening slogan of "Dawn of a New Day", and it allowed all visitors to take a look at "the world of tomorrow"
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Great Central Railway
The Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
(GCR) in England
England
came into being when the
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Channel Tunnel
The Channel Tunnel
Channel Tunnel
(French: Le tunnel sous la Manche; also nicknamed the Chunnel)[2][3] is a 50.45-kilometre (31.35 mi) rail tunnel linking Folkestone, Kent, in the United Kingdom, with Coquelles, Pas-de-Calais, near Calais
Calais
in northern France, beneath the English Channel at the Strait of Dover. At its lowest point, it is 75 m (250 ft) deep below the sea bed, and 115 m (380 ft) below sea level.[4][5][6] At 37.9 kilometres (23.5 mi), the tunnel has the longest undersea portion of any tunnel in the world, although the Seikan Tunnel
Seikan Tunnel
in Japan is both longer overall at 53.85 kilometres (33.46 mi) and deeper at 240 metres (790 ft) below sea level
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Toronto
Toronto
Toronto
(/təˈrɒntoʊ/ ( listen) tə-RON-toh, locally  [təˈɹɑnoʊ] (help·info)), officially the City of Toronto, is the capital of the Canadian province of Ontario. It is located within the Golden Horseshoe
Golden Horseshoe
in Southern Ontario
Ontario
on the northern shore of Lake Ontario. With 2,731,571 residents in 2016, it is the largest city in Canada
Canada
and fourth-largest city in North America by population
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Broad Street Line
The Broad Street Line
Broad Street Line
(BSL)—also known as the Broad Street Subway (BSS), Orange Line, or Broad Line—is a subway line owned by the city of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA). The line runs primarily north-south from the Fern Rock Transportation Center
Fern Rock Transportation Center
in North Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to Pattison Avenue in South Philadelphia; the latter station provides access to the stadiums and arenas for the city's major professional sports teams, about a quarter mile away. It is named for Broad Street, the street under which it runs for almost its entire length
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Bloor–Danforth Line
Line 2 Bloor–Danforth is a subway line in the Toronto subway system, operated by the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC).[3] It has 31 stations and is 26.2 kilometres (16.3 mi) in length. It opened on February 26, 1966,[4][5] and extensions at both ends were completed in 1968 and again in 1980. The most travelled part of the line is located in Old Toronto's midtown area known as Yorkville.[6] In this area, the subway also connects to Line 1 Yonge–University at Spadina, St. George and Yonge stations. Towards the east, the line runs parallel to Danforth Avenue serving areas such as Greektown and the East Danforth, it then continues further to the east through a very short stretch in East York to its eastern terminus in Scarborough, where it connects to Line 3 Scarborough
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Yonge–University Line
Line 1 Yonge–University[3] is the oldest and busiest line of the Toronto subway
Toronto subway
in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is operated by the Toronto
Toronto
Transit Commission, has 38 stations[3] and is 38.8 km (24.1 mi) in length.[2] It opened as the "Yonge subway" in 1954 as Canada's first underground passenger rail line, and was extended multiple times between 1963 and 2017. Averaging over 736,000 riders per weekday, Line 1 is the busiest rapid transit line in Canada, and one of the busiest lines in North America.[4] The eastern portion of the line runs under Yonge Street
Yonge Street
from its northeastern terminus at Finch Avenue
Finch Avenue
to Toronto
Toronto
Union Station, connecting with Line 4 Sheppard
Line 4 Sheppard
at Sheppard–Yonge and Line 2 Bloor–Danforth at Bloor–Yonge
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Sheppard Line
Line 4 Sheppard
Line 4 Sheppard
is the newest and shortest subway line of the Toronto subway system, operated by the Toronto
Toronto
Transit Commission (TTC).[2] It opened on November 22, 2002, and has five sta
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