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Isha People
The Isha sometimes spelt Ica, and Itcha are a relatively small group of the Yoruba people, situated in the western parts of middle Benin, West Africa, especially in the town of Bantè
Bantè
and other surrounding communities in the Collines Department.Part of a series onYoruba peopleCulture Music Art Language MythologySubgroupsAna-Ife Anago-Ifonyi Akoko Awori Egba Egun Ekiti Ibarapa Ibolo Idaasha Igbomina Ife Ijebu Ijesha Ikale Ilaje Isha Ketu Mokole Ohori Okun Olukumi Ondo Onko Owo Oworo Owu Oyo Remo Shabe Yewa-EgbadoMusicContemporary:Apala Fuji Were Yoruba Highlife Waka
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Collines Department
Collines is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The departments that border Collines are Plateau, Borgou, Zou, and Donga. The main ethnic groups in the department according to the National population census are Yoruba of the Nagot
Nagot
group at 46.8% and the Yoruba of the Idaasha at 14.9% for a total of 61.7% to constitute the majority, the Yoruba group is followed by the Mahi at 25.7% or just over a quarter of the regional population, while the Fon represent 13% of the population.[2] The département of Collines was created in 1999 when it was split off from Zou Department. Since 2016, the capital is Igbo Idaasha, known as Dassa Zoumé. Per 2013 census, the total population of the department was 717,477 with 353,592 males and 363,885 females. The proportion of women was 50.70 per cent. The total rural population was 72.50 percent, while the urban population was 27.50 per cent
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Olukumi People
The Olukumi people
Olukumi people
are an ancient fragment of Yoruba people, located in Aniocha North local government area of Delta State, Nigeria. The Olukumis occupy eight communities west of the Niger river, and are together known today, as the Odiani clan in Aniomaland. Historically, the Odianis are the Yoruba clans in the Anioma cultural area.[1] Ugbodu town is considered the traditional headquarters of the Olukumi people and is traditionally headed by the Oloza of Ugbodu
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Ife
Ife
Ife
(Yoruba: Ifè, also Ilé-Ifẹ̀) is an ancient Yoruba city in south-western Nigeria. The city is located in the present day Osun State. Ife
Ife
is about 218 kilometres (135 mi) northeast of Lagos.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Mythic origin of Ife: Creation of the world 1.2 Origin of the regional states: Dispersal from the holy city2 Traditional setting2.1 The King (Ooni) 2.2 Cults for the spirits 2.3 Art history3 Government 4 Geography 5 Economy 6 Exhibition 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]Yoruba Copper mask for King Obalufon, Ife, Nigeria
Nigeria
c. 1300 C.E.Mythic origin of Ife: Creation of the world[edit] According to Yoruba religion, Olodumare, the Supreme God, ordered Obatala
Obatala
to create the earth but on his way he found palm wine which he drank and became intoxicated
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Donga Department
Donga is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The capital of Donga is Djougou. The département of Donga was created in 1999 when it was split off from Atakora Department. Donga is subdivided into five communes, each centered at one of the principal towns, namely, Bassila, Copargo, Djougou
Djougou
Rural, Djougou
Djougou
Urban and Ouaké. Per 2013 census, the total population of the department was 543,130 with 270,754 males and 272,376 females. The proportion of women was 50.10 per cent. The total rural population was 57.90 percent, while the urban population was 42.10 per cent. The total labour force in the department was 120,021 out of which 24.20 per cent were women
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Okitipupa
Okitipupa
Okitipupa
is a Local Government Area in Ondo State, Nigeria. Her headquarters are in the town of Okitipupa, with a university that commenced academic session in year 2010/2011 section: Ondo State University of Science and Technology, Okitipupa
Okitipupa
(OSUSTECH). It has always been known as Ode-Idepe. The name Okitipupa
Okitipupa
originated from the elevation of the town and the colour of the soil of the town which is red in colour referred to in Yoruba language and its dialects as 'pupa'.Okiti-pupa is derived from Yoruba language Okiti(Hilly) and Pupa(Red) which was used by people travelling from other communities to trade in the Okitipupa
Okitipupa
central market. Today, inhabitants interchangeably use the names of Okitipupa
Okitipupa
and Idepe freely. It is native to the Ikales, who are a sub-set of the larger Yoruba tribe
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Ilaje
Ilaje
Ilaje
is a Local Government Area in Ondo State, Nigeria. Its headquarters are in the town of Igbokoda. The Ilajes are a distinct migratory coastal linguistic group of Yoruba peoples spread along the coastal belts of Ondo, Ogun, Lagos
Lagos
and Delta states, and originally made up of four geo-political entities namely: Ode Ugbo, Ode Mahin, Ode Etikan and Aheri
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Ketu (Benin)
Ketu is a historical region in what is now the Republic of Benin, in the area of the town of Kétou (Ketu). It is one of the oldest capitals of the Yoruba speaking people, tracing its establishment to a settlement founded by a descendant of Oduduwa, also known as Odudua, Oòdua and Eleduwa. The regents of the town were traditionally styled "Alaketu", and are related to the Egba sub-group of the Yoruba people in present-day Nigeria. Ketu is considered one of the sixteen original kingdoms established by the children of Oduduwa
Oduduwa
in Oyo mythic history, though this ancient pedigree has been somewhat neglected in contemporary Yoruba historical research, which tends to focus on communities within Nigeria. The exact status of Ketu within the Oyo empire however is contested
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Mokole Language (Benin)
Mokole (or Mokollé, Mokwale, Monkole, Féri) is a Yoruba language spoken in the villages surrounding the town of Kandi in Benin. It's the northernmost variety of Yoruba. References[edit]^ Mokole at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Mokole". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. v t e Languages of BeninOfficial languageFrenchIndigenous languagesGbeAguna Aja Alada Fon Gen Pherá Phla Tofin Tɔli WaciGurBerba Kabye Lama Lukpa Mbelime Mossi Nateni Ngangam Tammari Tem Waama YomKwaChakosi FoodoYoruboidEde Ifè Mokole YorubaOtherBariba Dendi Fula HausaThis Niger–Congo language-related article is a stub
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Ohori People
The Ohori (sometimes called Ije) are a subgroup of the Yoruba people of West Africa. The local domain of the Ohori is South-eastern Benin north of Pobè
Pobè
town. Often, Ohoris, together with groups of Ifonyis, Aworis and Ketus are known collectively as 'Nagos" in Benin.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Dialect 4 ReferencesGeography[edit] Ohori areas are bound by various Yoruba subgroups to the North, East and South. Egbados (Yewas) are to be found towards the East, the Ifonyis bound them to the South, while to their Northern boundary are the Ketus. They are bounded by the Gbe speaking Fon/Mahi group towards the West.[1] History[edit] The Ohori natural environment is a naturally swampy/marshy waterlogged depression (Kumi swamp) with what could be described as adverse physical conditions, therefore the area had historically been a safe haven for people fleeing persecution from the larger entities of Ketu, Oyo and others
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Sagamu
Ogun State
Ogun State
- 512,750  · Remo North: 70,470  · Ikenne: 140,490  · Shagamu: 301,790 Lagos State
Lagos State
- 619,520  · Ikorodu: 619,520ReligionChristianity · Islam · Yor
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Offa, Kwara
Offa is a city located in Kwara
Kwara
State, central Nigeria
Nigeria
with a population of about 90,000 inhabitants. The vegetation in Offa is savanna vegetation and the town is noted for its weaving and dyeing trade, using vegetable dyes made from locally grown indigo and other plants. Offa is well known for cultivation of Sweet potatoes and maize which also formed part of the favourite staple foods of the indigenes in the town. Offa in one of her eulogy is being address as the home of sweet potatoes. Cattle, goats and sheep are also raised in the environs. The key religions practised in the town are:- Islam, Christianity and Traditional religions. The ancient tradition for which the town is known is wrestling
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Savé
Savé
Savé
is a city in Benin, lying on the Cotonou- Parakou
Parakou
railway and the main north-south road. It is known for its local boulders, popular with climbers. "Savé" is the corrupted rendition of the historical Yoruba name Sabe The commune covers an area of 2228 square kilometres and as of 2002 had a population of 67,753 people.[2][3] Transport[edit] Savé
Savé
is served by a station of the Benin
Benin
Railways system. See also[edit] Railway
Railway
stations in BeninReferences[edit]^ "World Gazetteer". Archived from the original on January 11, 2013.  ^ "Save". Atlas Monographique des Communes du Benin. Retrieved January 5, 2010.  ^ "Communes of Benin". Statoids
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Apala
Apala (or Akpala) is a musical genre, originally derived from the Yoruba people
Yoruba people
of Nigeria.[1] It is a percussion-based style that developed in the late 1930s, when it was used to wake worshippers after fasting during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. The rhythms of apala grew more complex over time, influenced by Cuban music and eventually became quite popular in Kannada Instruments include a rattle (sekere), thumb piano (agidigbo) and a bell (agogô), as well as two or three talking drums. Haruna Ishola is undoubtedly the best-known performer of apala in Nigerian history. Others may hold a contrary view that Ayinla Omowura is better known, and the most successful musician of Apala. Both of them played an integral role in the popularization of the genre, and it is distinct from, older than, and much more difficult to master than fuji music
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Fuji Music
Fuji is a popular Nigerian musical genre. It arose from the improvisational Ajisari/were music tradition, which is a kind of music performed to wake Muslims before dawn during the Ramadan
Ramadan
fasting season. Were
Were
music/ Ajisari itself was made popular by Alhaji Sikiru Ayinde Barrister.Contents1 History1.1 Modernization 1.2 Continued growth2 Notes 3 External linksHistory[edit] Were
Were
music/Ajisari, traditionally, was an Islamic type music played by the Muslim children in Yorubaland
Yorubaland
to wake the faithful for fasting or Suhur
Suhur
during Ramadan
Ramadan
period. This musical genre was made popular by Alhaji Dauda Epo-Akara, the deceased who based in Ibadan,was the "awurebe" founder and Ganiyu Kuti, a.k.a
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Were Music
Were music (Yoruba: Wéré) is an indigenous Yoruba music, which, like ajisari, is a way of using music to arouse the Islamic
Islamic
faithful to pray and feast during Ramadan
Ramadan
festival in Yorubaland. Ajiwere or oniwere means "one who performs were music." Unlike ajisari, were is performed in groups. Usually young men or boys, numbering up to ten or more, come together to write songs and practise dance moves. Again unlike ajisari, who sleep a bit and only come out at 2:00 in the morning, the "ajiwere" or "oniwere" leave their homes each night shortly after the Isha'a
Isha'a
(8:00 PM) and Tarawih prayers. They'll then roam the streets singing and dancing till about 4:00 AM when they disperse to go prepare for that day's fasting
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