HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Irrigation
Irrigation
Irrigation
is the application of controlled amounts of water to plants at needed intervals. Irrigation
Irrigation
helps grow agricultural crops, maintain landscapes, and revegetate disturbed soils in dry areas and during periods of less than average rainfall. Irrigation
Irrigation
also has other uses in crop production, including frost protection,[1] suppressing weed growth in grain fields[2] and preventing soil consolidation.[3] In contrast, agriculture that relies only on direct rainfall is referred to as rain-fed or dry land farming. Irrigation
Irrigation
systems are also used for cooling livestock, dust suppression, disposal of sewage, and in mining
[...More...]

"Irrigation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Persia
The history of Iran, commonly also known as Persia
Persia
in the Western world, is intertwined with the history of a larger region, also to an extent known as Greater Iran, comprising the area from Anatolia, the Bosphorus, and Egypt
Egypt
in the w
[...More...]

"Ancient Persia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nubia
Nubia
Nubia
is a region along the Nile
Nile
river encompassing the area between Aswan
Aswan
in southern Egypt
Egypt
and Khartoum
Khartoum
in central Sudan. It was the seat of one of the earliest civilizations of ancient Africa, with a history that can be traced from at least 2500 BC onward ( Kerma
Kerma
culture), and was home to several empires, most prominently the kingdom of Kush, which for a while even ruled over Egypt. Its collapse in the 4th century AD after more than 1000 years of existence saw the rise of three Christian kingdoms, Nobatia, Makuria
Makuria
and Alodia, the last two again lasting 1000 years
[...More...]

"Nubia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amenemhet III
Amenemhat III, also spelled Amenemhet III, was a pharaoh of the Twelfth Dynasty of Egypt. He ruled from c. 1860 BCE to c
[...More...]

"Amenemhet III" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Common Era
Common Era or Current Era (CE)[1] is a name for a calendar era widely used around the world today. The era preceding CE is known as before the Common or Current Era (BCE). The Current Era notation system can be used as an alternative to the Dionysian era
Dionysian era
system, which distinguishes eras as AD (anno Domini, "[the] year of [the] Lord")[2] and BC ("before Christ"). The two notation systems are numerically equivalent; thus "2018 CE" corresponds to "AD 2018" and "400 BCE" corresponds to "400 BC".[2][3][4][a] Both notations refer to the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
(and its predecessor, the Julian calendar)
[...More...]

"Common Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Faiyum Oasis
The Faiyum
Faiyum
Oasis (Arabic: واحة الفيوم‎ Waḥet El Fayyum) is a depression or basin in the desert immediately to the west of the Nile
Nile
south of Cairo. The extent of the basin area is estimated at between 1,270 km² (490 mi²) and 1700 km² (656 mi²). The basin floor comprises fields watered by a channel of the Nile, the Bahr Yussef, as it drains into a desert depression to the west of the Nile
Nile
Valley. The Bahr Yussef veers west through a narrow neck of land north of Ihnasya, between the archaeological sites of El Lahun
El Lahun
and Gurob near Hawara; it then branches out, providing rich agricultural land in the Faiyum
Faiyum
basin, draining into the large saltwater Lake Moeris
Lake Moeris
(Birket Qarun). The lake was freshwater in prehistory but is today a saltwater lake
[...More...]

"Faiyum Oasis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Engineer
Engineers, as practitioners of engineering, are people who invent, design, analyse, build and test machines, systems, structures and materials to fulfill objectives and requirements while considering the limitations imposed by practicality, regulation, safety, and cost.[1][2] The word engineer ( Latin
Latin
ingeniator[3]) is derived from the Latin
[...More...]

"Engineer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mughal Emperor
The Mughal emperors, from the early 16th century to the early 18th century, built and ruled the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
on the Indian subcontinent, mainly corresponding to the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan
Afghanistan
and Bangladesh. The Mughals were a branch of the Timurid dynasty of Turkic origin from what is now Uzbekistan
[...More...]

"Mughal Emperor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bahadur Shah II
Mirza Abu Zafar Sirajuddin Muhammad
Muhammad
Bahadur Shah Zafar
Bahadur Shah Zafar
(24 October 1775 – 7 November 1862) was the last Mughal emperor. He was the second son[1] of and became the successor to his father, Akbar
Akbar
II, upon his death on 28 September 1837. He was a nominal Emperor, as the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
existed in name only and his authority was limited only to the city of Delhi
Delhi
(Shahjahanbad). Following his involvement in the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the British exiled him to Rangoon
Rangoon
in British-controlled Burma, after convicting him on conspiracy charges. Zafar's father, Akbar II
Akbar II
had been imprisoned by the British and he was not his father’s preferred choice as his successor
[...More...]

"Bahadur Shah II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sakia
A sakia, alternative spelling sakieh or saqiya (from Arabic: ساقية‎, sāqīya), also called Persian wheel, tablia, and in Latin tympanum[1] is a mechanical water lifting device which uses buckets, jars, or scoops fastened either directly to a vertical wheel, or to an endless belt activated by such a wheel. The vertical wheel is itself attached by a drive shaft to a horizontal wheel, which is traditionally set in motion by animal power (oxen, donkeys, etc.) Because it is not using the power of flowing water, the sakia is different from a noria and any other type of water-wheel. It is still used in India, Egypt
Egypt
and other parts of the Middle East, and in the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
and the Balearic Islands. It may have been invented in Hellenistic Egypt, Persia or India
[...More...]

"Sakia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Watercourse
A watercourse is the channel that a flowing body of water follows.[1] In the UK, some aspects of criminal law, such as The Rivers (Prevention of Pollution) Act 1951, specify that a watercourse includes those rivers which are dry for part of the year.[2] In some jurisdictions, owners of land over which the water flows may have rights to some or much of the water in a legal sense.[3] These include estuaries, rivers, streams, anabranches[4] and canals.[5] If it is navigable, it is also a "waterway".[1] See also[edit]Environmental flow Hydrology Physical geography WadiReferences[edit]^ a b " Waterway
Waterway
Definition". Duhaime.org. Retrieved 2016-08-24.  ^ "Rivers (Prevention of Pollution)Act 1951". legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 25 August 2016.  ^ "Legal Definition of Water Course". Lectlaw.com. Retrieved 2016-08-24.  ^ North, Colin P. "Recognition of the Sedimentary Architecture of Dryland Anabranching (Anastomosing) Rivers"
[...More...]

"Watercourse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tamil Nadu, India
^# Jana Gana Mana is the national anthem, while "Invocation to Tamil Mother" is the state song/anthem. ^† Established in 1773; Madras State was formed in 1950 and renamed as Tamil Nadu on 14 January 1969[9] ^^ Tamil is the official language of the state. English is declared as an additional official language for communication purposes.[8]SymbolsEmblemSrivilliputhur Andal templeLanguageTamilSong"Invocation to Goddess Tamil"DanceBharathanattiyamAnimalNilgiri tahrBirdEmerald doveFlowerGloriosa lilyTreePalm treeSportKabaddiTamil Nadu (Tamil pronunciation: [t̪amiɻ n̪aːᶑu] ( listen) literally 'The Land of Tamils' or 'Tamil Country') is one of the 29 states of India. Its capital and largest city is Chennai (formerly known as Madras). Tamil Nadu[10] lies in the southernmost part of the Indian Peninsula and is bordered by the union territory of Puducherry and the South Indian states of Kerala, Karnataka, and Andhra Pradesh
[...More...]

"Tamil Nadu, India" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radiocarbon Dating
Radiocarbon dating
Radiocarbon dating
(also referred to as carbon dating or carbon-14 dating) is a method for determining the age of an object containing organic material by using the properties of radiocarbon (14C), a radioactive isotope of carbon. The method was developed by Willard Libby
Willard Libby
in the late 1940s and soon became a standard tool for archaeologists. Libby received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in 1960. The radiocarbon dating method is based on the fact that radiocarbon is constantly being created in the atmosphere by the interaction of cosmic rays with atmospheric nitrogen. The resulting radiocarbon combines with atmospheric oxygen to form radioactive carbon dioxide, which is incorporated into plants by photosynthesis; animals then acquire 14C by eating the plants
[...More...]

"Radiocarbon Dating" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

4th Millennium BCE
A millennium (plural millennia or millenniums) is a period equal to 1000 years,[1] also called kiloyears. It derives from the Latin
Latin
mille, thousand, and annus, year. It is often, but not always, related to a particular dating system. Sometimes, it is used specifically for periods of a thousand years that begin at the starting point (initial reference point) of the calendar in consideration (typically the year "1"), or in later years that are whole number multiples of a thousand years after it
[...More...]

"4th Millennium BCE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New World
The New World
World
is one of the names used for the majority of Earth's Western Hemisphere, specifically the Americas
Americas
(including nearby islands such as those of the Caribbean and Bermuda). The term originated in the early 16th century after Europeans made landfall in what would later be called the Americas
Americas
in the age of discovery, expanding the geographical horizon of classical geographers, who had thought of the world as consisting of Africa, Europe, and Asia, collectively now referred to as the Old World (a.k.a
[...More...]

"New World" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

5th Millennium BCE
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe 5th millennium BC spanned the years 5000 through 4001 BC. It saw the spread of agriculture from Western Asia
Western Asia
throughout Southern and Central Europe. Urban cultures in Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
and Anatolia
Anatolia
flourished, developing the wheel. Copper
Copper
ornaments became more common, marking the beginning of the Chalcolithic. Animal husbandry
Animal husbandry
spread throughout Eurasia, reaching China
[...More...]

"5th Millennium BCE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.