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Irish People
Irish Travellers, Anglo-Irish, Bretons, Cornish, English, Icelanders,[12] Manx, Norse, Scots, Ulster
Ulster
Scots, Welsh Other Northern European
Northern European
ethnic groups* Around 800,000 people born in
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Education In Northern Ireland
Coordinates: 54°38′24″N 5°40′34″W / 54.640°N 5.676°W / 54.640; -5.676 Education in Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
differs from systems used elsewhere in the United Kingdom, although it is relatively similar to Wales. A child's age on 1 July determines the point of entry into the relevant stage of education, unlike England and Wales
Wales
where it is 1 September. Northern Ireland's results at GCSE and A-Level
A-Level
are consistently top in the UK
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Irish Calendar
The Irish calendar is the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
as it was in use in Ireland, but also incorporating Irish cultural festivals and views of the division of the seasons, presumably inherited from earlier Celtic calendar traditions. For example, the pre-Christian Celtic year began on 1 November, although in common with the rest of the Western world, it now begins on 1 January.[1][clarification needed]Winter ("Geimhreadh") - November, December, January (Samhain, Nollaig, Eanáir) Spring ("Earrach") - February, March, April (Feabhra, Márta, Aibreán) Summer ("Samhradh") - May, June, July (Bealtaine, Meitheamh, Iúil) Autumn ("Fómhar" Harvest) - August, September, October (Lúnasa, Meán Fómhair, Deireadh Fómhair)In English-language Julian calendars, the months are based on names from Classical mythology, such as the name "February" which derives from the Roman purification rite, Februa
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Vikings
Vikings
Vikings
(Old English: wicing—"pirate",[1] Danish and Bokmål: vikinger; Swedish and Nynorsk: vikingar; Icelandic: víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of northern, central, eastern and western Europe, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.[2][3] The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Viking home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age
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Demographics Of Northern Ireland
Demography
Demography
(from prefix demo- from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
δῆμος dēmos meaning "the people", and -graphy from γράφω graphō, implies "writing, description or measurement"[1]) is the statistical study of populations, especially human beings. As a very general science, it can analyze any kind of dynamic living population, i.e., one that changes over time or space (see population dynamics). Demography encompasses the study of the size, structure, and distribution of these populations, and spatial or temporal changes in them in response to birth, migration, aging, and death. Based on the demographic research of the earth, earth's population up to the year 2050 and 2100 can be estimated by demographers
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Presbyterian Church In Ireland
The Presbyterian
Presbyterian
Church in Ireland (PCI; Irish: Eaglais Phreispitéireach in Éirinn, Ulster-Scots: Prisbytairin Kirk in Airlann)[2][3] is the largest Presbyterian
Presbyterian
denomination in Ireland, and the largest Protestant
Protestant
denomination in Northern Ireland. Like most Christian churches in Ireland, it is organised on an all-island basis, in both Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
and the Republic of Ireland
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Protestantism In Ireland
Protestantism
Protestantism
is a Christian minority on the island of Ireland. In the 2011 census of Northern Ireland, 48% (883,768) described themselves as Protestant, which was a decline of approximately 5% from the 2001 census.[1][2] In the 2011 census of the Republic of Ireland, 4.27% of the population described themselves as Protestant.[3] In the Republic, Protestantism
Protestantism
was the second largest religious grouping until the 2002 census in which they were exceeded by those who chose "No Religion".[3] Some forms of Protestantism
Protestantism
existed in Ireland
Ireland
in the early 16th century before the English Reformation, but demographically speaking these were very insignificant and the real influx of Protestantism
Protestantism
began only with the spread of the English Reformation
English Reformation
to Ireland
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Northern European
Northern Europe
Europe
is the general term for the geographical region in Europe
Europe
that is approximately north of the southern coast of the Baltic Sea. Nations usually included within this region are Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia
Latvia
and Lithuania, and occasionally Ireland, Britain, northern Germany, northern Belarus
Belarus
and northwest Russia. Narrower definitions may be based on other geographical factors such as climate and ecology. A broader definition would include the area north of the Alps
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Shelta Language
Shelta (/ˈʃɛltə/;[3] Irish: Seiltis)[4] is a language spoken by Irish Travellers, particularly in Ireland and the United Kingdom.[5] It is widely known as the Cant, to its native speakers in Ireland as De Gammon, and to the linguistic community as Shelta.[6] It was often used as a cryptolect to exclude outsiders from comprehending conversations between Travellers,[5] although this aspect is frequently over-emphasised.[6] The exact number of native speakers is hard to determine due to sociolinguistic issues[6] but Ethnologue
Ethnologue
puts the number of speakers at 30,000 in UK, 6,000 in Ireland, and 50,000 in the US. The figure for at least the UK is dated to 1990; it is not clear if the other figures are from the same source.[1] Linguistically Shelta is today seen as a mixed language that stems from a community of travelling people in Ireland that was originally predominantly Irish-speaking
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Ulster Scots Dialects
Ulster
Ulster
Scots or Ulster-Scots (Ulstèr-Scotch),[7][8] also known as Ullans, is the Scots language
Scots language
as spoken in parts of
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Irish Art
The history of Irish art
Irish art
starts around 3200 BC with Neolithic
Neolithic
stone carvings at the Newgrange
Newgrange
megalithic tomb, part of the Brú na Bóinne complex, County Meath. In early- Bronze Age
Bronze Age
Ireland there is evidence of Beaker culture
Beaker culture
and a widespread metalworking
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Hiberno-English
Hiberno‐English (from Latin Hibernia: "Ireland") or Irish English[2] is the set of English dialects natively written and spoken within the island of Ireland
Ireland
(including both the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
and Northern Ireland).[3] English was brought to Ireland
Ireland
as a result of the Norman invasion of Ireland
Ireland
of the late 12th century. Initially, it was mainly spoken in an area known as the Pale around Dublin, with mostly Irish spoken throughout the rest of the country
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Icelanders
Icelanders
Icelanders
(Icelandic: Íslendingar) are an ethnic group and nation, native to Iceland, mostly speaking the Germanic language Icelandic.[8] Icelanders
Icelanders
established the country of Iceland
Iceland
in 930 A.D. when Althingi (Parliament) met for the first time. Iceland
Iceland
came under the reign of Norwegian, Swedish and Danish kings but regained full sovereignty and independence from the Danish monarchy
Danish monarchy
on 1 December 1918, when Kingdom of Iceland
Iceland
was established. On 17 June 1944, the monarchy was abolished and the Icelandic republic was founded. The language spoken is Icelandic, a North Germanic language, and Lutheranism
Lutheranism
is the predominant religion
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