HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Irish Dance
Irish dance
Irish dance
or Irish dancing is a group of traditional dance forms originating from Ireland, encompassing dancing both solo and in groups, and dancing for social, competitive and performance purposes. Irish dance
Irish dance
in its current form developed from various influences such as French quadrilles and English country dancing throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. Dance
Dance
was taught by "travelling dance masters" across Ireland
Ireland
throughout this period, and separate dance forms developed according to regional practice and differing purposes. Irish dance became a significant part of Irish culture, particularly for Irish nationalist movements
[...More...]

"Irish Dance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Country Dance
A country dance is any of a large number of social dances of the British Isles in which couples dance together in a figure or "set", each dancer dancing to his or her partner and each couple dancing to the other couples in the set.[1] A set consists most commonly of two or three couples, sometimes four and rarely five or six. Often dancers follow a "caller" who names each change in the figures. Introduced to France and then Germany and Italy in the course of the 17th century, country dances gave rise to the contradanse, one of the significant dance forms in classical music. Introduced to America by French immigrants, it remains popular in the United States as contra dance and had great influence upon Latin American music as contradanza. The Anglais (from the French word meaning "English") or Angloise is another term for the English country dance.[2][3] A Scottish country dance
Scottish country dance
may be termed an Ecossaise
[...More...]

"English Country Dance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bagpipes
Bagpipes
Bagpipes
are a woodwind instrument using enclosed reeds fed from a constant reservoir of air in the form of a bag. Though the Scottish Great Highland bagpipes
Highland bagpipes
are the best known in the Anglophone world, bagpipes have been played for a millennium or more throughout large parts of Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia, including Turkey, the Caucasus, and around the Persian Gulf
[...More...]

"Bagpipes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Penn State University
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State University (commonly referred to as Penn State or PSU) is a state-related, land-grant, doctoral university with campuses and facilities throughout Pennsylvania. Founded in 1855, the university has a stated threefold mission of teaching, research, and public service. Its instructional mission[12] includes undergraduate, graduate, professional and continuing education offered through resident instruction and online delivery. Its University Park campus, the flagship campus, lies within the Borough of State College and College Township. It has two law schools: Penn State Law, on the school's University Park campus, and Dickinson Law, located in Carlisle, 90 miles south of State College. The College of Medicine is located in Hershey
[...More...]

"Penn State University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christmas Eve
Christmas
Christmas
Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas
Christmas
Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.[4] Christmas
Christmas
Day is observed around the world, and Christmas
Christmas
Eve is widely observed as a full or partial holiday in anticipation of Christmas
Christmas
Day
[...More...]

"Christmas Eve" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

County Cork
County Cork (Irish: Contae Chorcaí) is the largest and southernmost county of Ireland. It is situated in the province of Munster and named after the city of Cork (Irish: Corcaigh), Ireland's second largest city. Cork County Council is the local authority for the county. Its largest market towns are Mallow, Macroom, Midleton and Skibbereen. Cork City is governed by the City Council. In 2016, the county's population was 542,196, making it the third most populous county in Ireland.[1] Notable Corkonians include Michael Collins, Jack Lynch and Sonia O'Sullivan. Cork borders four other counties; Kerry to the west, Limerick to the north, Tipperary to the north-east and Waterford to the east. The county contains the Golden Vale pastureland and stretches from Kanturk in the north to Allihies in the south
[...More...]

"County Cork" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baltimore, County Cork
Baltimore (/ˈbæltɪmɔːr/, locally [-moːɹ]; Irish: Dún na Séad,[1] translated as the "Fort of the Jewels") is a village in western County Cork, Ireland. It is the main village in the parish of Rathmore and the Islands, the southernmost parish in Ireland. It is the main ferry port to Sherkin Island, Cape Clear Island
Cape Clear Island
and the eastern side of Roaring Water Bay (Loch Trasna) and Carbery's Hundred Isles. Although the name Baltimore is an anglicisation of the Irish Baile an Tí Mhóir meaning "town of the big house", the Irish-language name for Baltimore is that of the O'Driscoll castle, Dún na Séad or Dunashad ("fort of the jewels")
[...More...]

"Baltimore, County Cork" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mayor Of Waterford
Contents1 The Kings of Viking Waterford
Waterford
(914–1170) 2 Early Cambro-Norman
Cambro-Norman
Rulers (1170–1284) 3 Mayors of Waterford
Waterford
(1284 – present day)3.1 1284–1299 3.2 1300–1399 3.3 1400–1499 3.4 1500–1599 3.5 1600–1699 3.6 1700–1799 3.7 1800–1891 3.8 1900–1999 3.9 1999–Present4 ReferencesThe Kings of Viking Waterford
Waterford
(914–1170)[edit] The Vikings, who had created a longphort near Waterford
Waterford
in 853, finally settled and created a town in 914. These were led by Ottir Iarla. Ragnall ua Ímair
Ragnall ua Ímair
then installed himself over them in 917, however leaving a year later to Britain, with Ottir, and presumably placing a deputy in control
[...More...]

"Mayor Of Waterford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

South Of England
Southern England, or the South of England, also known as the South, refers roughly to the southern counties of England. The extent of this area can take a number of different interpretations depending on the context, including geographical, cultural, political and economic. Geographically, the extent of the south of England
England
may vary from the southern quarter (below the M4/Northern M25), via one-third of the country (excluding central England), to the southern half, bordering northern England. The South is often considered a principal cultural area of England, along with the Midlands and Northern England
[...More...]

"South Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oral Tradition
Oral tradition, or oral lore, is a form of human communication where in knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another.[1][2][3] The transmission is through speech or song and may include folktales, ballads, chants, prose or verses. In this way, it is possible for a society to transmit oral history, oral literature, oral law and other knowledge across generations without a writing system, or in parallel to a writing system
[...More...]

"Oral Tradition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Irish Diaspora
The Irish diaspora
Irish diaspora
(Irish: Diaspóra na nGael) refers to Irish people and their descendants who live outside Ireland. The phenomenon of migration from Ireland
Ireland
is recorded since early Medieval times,[1] but it is only possible to quantify it from around 1700: since then between 9 and 10 million people born in Ireland
Ireland
have emigrated. This is more than the population of Ireland
Ireland
at its historical peak in the 1840s of 8.5 million. The poorest of them went to Great Britain, especially Liverpool; those who could afford it went further, including almost 5 million to the United States.[2] After 1840, emigration from Ireland
Ireland
became a massive, relentless, and efficiently managed national enterprise.[3] In 1890 40% of Irish-born people were living abroad
[...More...]

"Irish Diaspora" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Time Signature
The time signature (also known as meter signature,[1] metre signature,[2] or measure signature[3]) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats (pulses) are to be contained in each measure (bar) and which note value is equivalent to one beat. In a music score, the time signature appears at the beginning, as a time symbol or stacked numerals, such as or 3 4 (read common time and three-four time, respectively), immediately following the key signature or immediately following the clef symbol if the key signature is empty
[...More...]

"Time Signature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reel
A reel is an object around which lengths of another material (usually long and flexible) are wound for storage. Generally a reel has a cylindrical core and walls on the sides to retain the material wound around the core. In some cases the core is hollow, although other items may be mounted on it, and grips may exist for mechanically turning the reel.Contents1 Construction 2 Uses 3 Motion picture terminology 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksConstruction[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The size of the core is dependent on several factors
[...More...]

"Reel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jew's Harp
The Jew's harp, also known as the jaw harp, mouth harp, Ozark harp or juice harp, is a lamellophone instrument, consisting of a flexible metal or bamboo tongue or reed attached to a frame. The tongue/reed is placed in the performer's mouth and plucked with the finger to produce a note. Each instrument produces one pitch only, with its multiples (overtones), though different sized instruments provide different pitches
[...More...]

"Jew's Harp" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bar (music)
In musical notation, a bar (or measure) is a segment of time corresponding to a specific number of beats in which each beat is represented by a particular note value and the boundaries of the bar are indicated by vertical bar lines. Dividing music into bars provides regular reference points to pinpoint locations within a musical composition. It also makes written music easier to follow, since each bar of staff symbols can be read and played as a batch.[1] Typically, a piece consists of several bars of the same length, and in modern musical notation the number of beats in each bar is specified at the beginning of the score by the time signature
[...More...]

"Bar (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Country Dance
A country dance is any of a large number of social dances of the British Isles in which couples dance together in a figure or "set", each dancer dancing to his or her partner and each couple dancing to the other couples in the set.[1] A set consists most commonly of two or three couples, sometimes four and rarely five or six. Often dancers follow a "caller" who names each change in the figures. Introduced to France and then Germany and Italy in the course of the 17th century, country dances gave rise to the contradanse, one of the significant dance forms in classical music. Introduced to America by French immigrants, it remains popular in the United States as contra dance and had great influence upon Latin American music as contradanza. The Anglais (from the French word meaning "English") or Angloise is another term for the English country dance.[2][3] A Scottish country dance
Scottish country dance
may be termed an Ecossaise
[...More...]

"Country Dance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.