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Iranian Plateau
The Iranian Plateau
Plateau
or the Persian Plateau[1][2] is a geological formation in Western Asia
Western Asia
and Central Asia
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Anatolia
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
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Terrane
A terrane in geology, in full a tectonostratigraphic terrane, is a fragment of crustal material formed on, or broken off from, one tectonic plate and accreted or "sutured" to crust lying on another plate. The crustal block or fragment preserves its own distinctive geologic history, which is different from that of the surrounding areas — hence the term "exotic" terrane. The suture zone between a terrane and the crust it attaches to is usually identifiable as a fault. Older usage of terrane simply described a series of related rock formations or an area having a preponderance of a particular rock or rock groups.Contents1 Overview 2 Tectonostratigraphic
Tectonostratigraphic
terranes 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] A tectonostratigraphic terrane is not necessarily an independent microplate in origin, since it may not contain the full thickness of the lithosphere
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Tabriz
Tabriz
Tabriz
(pronounced [tæbˈriːz] ( listen)) (Persian: تبریز‎; Azerbaijani: تبریز) is the most populated city in Iranian Azerbaijan,[1] one of the historical capitals of Iran
Iran
and the present capital of East Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
province. Located in the Quru River valley, between long ridges of volcanic cones in the Sahand
Sahand
and Eynali mountains, Tabriz's elevation ranges between 1,350 and 1,600 metres (4,430 and 5,250 ft) above sea level. The valley opens up into a plain that gently slopes down to the eastern shores of Lake Urmia, 60 kilometres (37 miles) to the west. With cold winters and temperate summers, Tabriz
Tabriz
is considered a summer resort
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Shiraz
Shiraz
Shiraz
(/ʃiːˈrɑːz/ ( listen); (Persian: شیراز‬‎), Šīrāz, Persian pronunciation: [ʃiːˈrɒːz],  pronunciation (help·info)) is the fifth-most-populous city of Iran[1] and the capital of Fars Province
Fars Province
( Old Persian
Old Persian
as Pars). At the 2011 census, the population of the city was 1,700,665 and its built-up area with "Shahr-e Jadid-e Sadra" (Sadra New Town) was home to 1,500,644 inhabitants.[2] Shiraz
Shiraz
is located in the southwest of Iran
Iran
on the "Roodkhaneye Khoshk" (The Dry River) seasonal river. It has a moderate climate and has been a regional trade center for over a thousand years
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Peshawar
Peshawar
Peshawar
(Pashto: پېښور‎  pronunciation (help·info); Urdu: پشاور‬‎  pronunciation (help·info); Hindko: پشور‎) is the capital of the Pakistani province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.[5] It also serves as the administrative centre and economic hub for the Federally Administered Tribal Areas.[6] Situated in a broad valley near the eastern end of the historic Khyber Pass, close to the border with Afghanistan, Peshawar's recorded history dates back to at least 539 BCE, making it the oldest city in
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Quetta
Quetta
Quetta
(Pashto: کوټه‎; Balochi: کویته‬‎; Hazaragi: کوٹه‬‎; Urdu: کوئٹہ‬‎; [kʷɛʈə]  pronunciation (help·info)) is the provincial capital and largest city of Balochistan, Pakistan.[4] Quetta
Quetta
was largely destroyed in the 1935 Quetta
Quetta
earthquake, but was rebuilt and now has a population of 1,001,205 as of 2017[5] while the Quetta District
Quetta District
has a population of 2,275,699.[6] Quetta
Quetta
is at an average elevation of 1,680 meters (5,510 feet) above sea level,[7] making it Pakistan's only high-altitude major city
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Damavand
Mount Damavand
Mount Damavand
(Persian: دماوند‎ [dæmɒːvænd] ( listen)), a potentially active volcano, is a stratovolcano which is the highest peak in Iran
Iran
and the highest volcano in Asia; the Kunlun Volcanic Group
Kunlun Volcanic Group
in Tibet
Tibet
is higher than Damāvand, but are not considered to be volcanic mountains.[7][8] Damāvand has a special place in Persian mythology
Persian mythology
and folklore. It is in the middle of the Alborz
Alborz
range, adjacent to Varārū, Sesang, Gol-e Zard, and Mīānrūd
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Dasht-e Loot
The Lut Desert, widely referred to as Dasht-e Lut
Dasht-e Lut
(Persian: دشت لوت‎, "Emptiness Plain"), is a large salt desert located in the provinces of Kerman
Kerman
and Sistan and Baluchestan, Iran
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Kerman
Kerman
Kerman
( pronunciation (help·info)) (Persian: كرمان‎, also Romanized as Kermān, Kermun, and Kirman; also known as Carmania)[2] is the capital city of Kerman
Kerman
Province, Iran. At the 2011 census, its population was 821,374, in 221,389 households, making it the 10th most populous city of Iran.[3] It is the largest and most developed city in Kerman Province
Kerman Province
and the most important city in the southeast of Iran. It is also one of the largest cities of Iran
Iran
in terms of area. Kerman
Kerman
is famous for its long history and strong cultural heritage[citation needed]. The city is home to many historic mosques and Zoroastrian
Zoroastrian
fire temples. Kerman
Kerman
is also on the recent list of the world's 1000 cleanest cities[citation needed]
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Accretion (geology)
Accretion is a process by which material is added to a tectonic plate or a landmass. This material may be sediment, volcanic arcs, seamounts, or other igneous features. Description[edit] Accretion involves the addition of material to a tectonic plate. When two tectonic plates collide, one of the plates may slide under the other, a process known as subduction. The plate which is being subducted, is floating on the asthenosphere and is pushed against the other, over-riding plate. Sediment on the ocean floor will often be scraped from the subducting plate. This causes the sediment to accumulate as a mass of material called an accretionary wedge, which attaches itself to the upper plate. Volcanic island arcs or seamounts may collide with the continent, and as they are of relatively light material (i.e
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Gondwana
Gondwana
Gondwana
( /ɡɒndˈwɑːnə/),[1] or Gondwanaland,[2] was a supercontinent that existed from the Neoproterozoic (about 550 million years ago) until the Carboniferous
Carboniferous
(about 320 million years ago). It was formed by the accretion of several cratons. Eventually, Gondwana became the largest piece of continental crust of the Paleozoic
Paleozoic
Era, covering an area of about 100,000,000 km2 (39,000,000 sq mi).[3] During the Carboniferous, it merged with Euramerica
Euramerica
to form a larger supercontinent called Pangaea. Gondwana
Gondwana
(and Pangaea) gradually broke up during the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era
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Platform (geology)
In geology, a platform is a continental area covered by relatively flat or gently tilted, mainly sedimentary strata, which overlie a basement of consolidated igneous or metamorphic rocks of an earlier deformation. Platforms, shields and the basement rocks together constitute cratons.[1] Platform sediments can be classified into the following groups: a "protoplatform" of metamorphosed sediments at the bottom, a "quasiplatform" of slightly deformed sediments, a "cataplatform", and a "orthoplatform" at the top. The Mesoproterozoic Jotnian
Jotnian
sediments of the Baltic area are examples of a "quasiplatform".[2] The post- Ordovician
Ordovician
rocks of the South American Platform are examples of an orthoplatform.[3] See also[edit]Carbonate platform East European Platform List of shields and cratonsReferences[edit]^ Parker, Sybil P. (Ed.). 1997. McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Geology
Geology
and Mineralogy
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Hindu Kush
Coordinates: 35°N 71°E / 35°N 71°E / 35; 71 Hindu
Hindu
Kush Hindu
Hindu
Kush rangeHighest pointPeak Tirich MirElevation 7,708 m (25,289 ft)Coordinates 36°14′45″N 71°50′38″E / 36.24
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Plate Tectonics
Plate tectonics
Plate tectonics
(from the Late Latin
Late Latin
tectonicus, from the Greek: τεκτονικός "pertaining to building")[1] is a scientific theory describing the large-scale motion of seven large plates and the movements of a larger number of smaller plates of the Earth's lithosphere, since tectonic processes began on Earth
Earth
between 3 and 3.5 billion years ago. The model builds on the concept of continental drift, an idea developed during the first decades of the 20th century. The geoscientific community accepted plate-tectonic theory after seafloor spreading was validated in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The lithosphere, which is the rigid outermost shell of a planet (the crust and upper mantle), is broken into tectonic plates. The Earth's lithosphere is composed of seven or eight major plates (depending on how they are defined) and many minor plates
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Economic Geology
Economic geology
Economic geology
is concerned with earth materials that can be used for economic and/or industrial purposes. These materials include precious and base metals, nonmetallic minerals, construction-grade stone, petroleum minerals, coal, and water. Economic geology
Economic geology
is a subdiscipline of the geosciences; according to Lindgren (1933) it is “the application of geology”. Today, we might call it the scientific study of the Earth’s sources of mineral raw materials and the practical application of the acquired knowledge.[1] The term commonly refers to metallic mineral deposits and mineral resources. The techniques employed by other earth science disciplines (such as geochemistry, mineralogy, geophysics, petrology and structural geology) might all be used to understand, describe, and exploit an ore deposit. Economic geology
Economic geology
is studied and practiced by geologists
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