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Invercargill (New Zealand Electorate)
Invercargill
Invercargill
is an electorate of the New Zealand Parliament
New Zealand Parliament
that has existed since 1866. Since the 2014 election, the electorate's representative is Sarah Dowie
Sarah Dowie
of the National Party.Contents1 Population centres 2 History2.1 Members of Parliament 2.2 List MPs3 Election results3.1 2017 election 3.2 2014 election 3.3 2011 election 3.4 2008 election 3.5 2005 election 3.6 2002 election 3.7 1999 election 3.8 1996 election 3.9 1931 election 3.10 1930 by-election 3.11 1928 election 3.12 1925 election 3.13 1899 election 3.14 1896 election 3.15 1893 election 3.16 1890 election 3.17 1878 by-election 3.18 1875 election 3.19 1873 by-election 3.20 1871 election4 Table footnotes 5 Notes 6 ReferencesPopulation centres[edit] The electorate covers Invercargill
Invercargill
city and the surrounding rural area, including Stewart Island / Rakiura
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Independent Liberal
Independent Liberal is a description allowed in politics to denote party affiliation. It is used to designate a politician as a liberal, yet independent of the official Liberal Party of a country. Those parties were the Liberal Party of Canada, or the Liberal Party of the United Kingdom, or the New Zealand Liberal Party. Canada[edit] Independent Liberal Members of Parliament (or of the Canadian Senate or a provincial legislative assembly) are typically former Liberal caucus members who were either expelled from the Liberal Party caucus or resigned the whip due to a political disagreement
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New Zealand Liberal Party
The New Zealand Liberal Party
New Zealand Liberal Party
was the first organised political party in New Zealand. It governed from 1891 until 1912. The Liberal strategy was to create a large class of small land-owning farmers who supported Liberal ideals, by buying large tracts of Māori land and selling it to small farmers on credit. The Liberal Government also established the basis of the later welfare state, with old age pensions, developed a system for settling industrial disputes, which was accepted by both employers and trade unions. In 1893 it extended voting rights to women, making New Zealand the first country in the world to enact universal female suffrage. New Zealand gained international attention for the Liberal reforms, especially how the state regulated labour relations.[1] It was innovating in the areas of maximum hour regulations, minimum wage laws, and compulsory arbitration procedures
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New Zealand Parliament
Government (55)     Labour (46)      NZ First (9) Confidence and supply (8)     Green (8)Official Opposition (56)     National (56) Crossbench
Crossbench
(1)     ACT (1)Meeting place
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Stewart Island / Rakiura
Stewart Island/Rakiura (commonly called Stewart Island) is the third-largest island of New Zealand. It lies 30 kilometres (19 mi) south of the South Island, across the Foveaux Strait. Its permanent population is 381 people as of the 2013 census, most of whom live in the settlement of Oban on the eastern side of the island.[1]Contents1 History and naming 2 Geography2.1 Geomagnetic anomaly3 Settlements 4 Economy and communications 5 Government 6 Ecology6.1 Flora 6.2 Fauna 6.3 Threats and preservation7 Claims of independence 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksHistory and naming[edit]Paterson Inlet at sunsetMudflats near ObanThe original Māori name, Te Punga o Te Waka a Maui, positions Stewart Island/Rakiura firmly at the heart of Māori mythology
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New Zealand Reform Party
The Reform Party, formally the New Zealand
New Zealand
Political Reform League, was New Zealand's second major political party, having been founded as a conservative response to the original Liberal Party
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Mixed-member Proportional Representation
Mixed-member proportional (MMP) representation is a mixed electoral system in which voters get two votes: one to decide the representative for their single-seat constituency, and one for a political party. Seats in the legislature are filled firstly by the successful constituency candidates, and secondly, by party candidates based on the percentage of nationwide or region-wide votes that each party received.[1][2][3] The constituency representatives are elected using first-past-the-post voting (FPTP) or another plurality/majoritarian system. The nationwide or region-wide party representatives are, in most jurisdictions, drawn from published party lists, similar to party-list proportional representation
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Wallace (New Zealand Electorate)
Wallace was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It was established in 1858, the first election held in 1859, and existed until 1996. For a time, it was represented by two members. In total, there were 18 Members of Parliament from the Wallace electorate.Contents1 Population centres 2 History2.1 Members of Parliament3 Election results3.1 1943 election 3.2 1931 election 3.3 1899 election 3.4 1896 election 3.5 1890 election4 Notes 5 ReferencesPopulation centres[edit] The initial 24 New Zealand electorates
New Zealand electorates
were defined by Governor George Grey in March 1853, based on the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 that had been passed by the British government
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New Zealand Labour Party
The New Zealand
New Zealand
Labour Party (Māori: Rōpū Reipa o Aotearoa),[10] or simply Labour (Reipa), is a centre-left political party in New Zealand.[6] The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism,[11] while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice.[2][3] It is a participant of the international Progressive Alliance.[8] The New Zealand
New Zealand
Labour Party was formed in 1916 by various socialist parties and trade unions. It is thus the country's oldest political party still in existence.[12] With its historic rival, the New Zealand National Party, Labour has dominated New Zealand
New Zealand
governments since the 1930s.[13] To date, there have been six periods of Labour government under ten Labour prime ministers. The party was first in power from 1935 to 1949, when it established New Zealand's welfare state
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New Zealand General Election, 1879
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
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United Party (New Zealand)
The United Party of New Zealand, a party formed out of the remnants of the Liberal Party, formed a government between 1928 and 1935, and in 1936 merged with the Reform Party to establish the National Party.Contents1 Foundation 2 Success 3 Coalition 4 Merger 5 Parliamentary Leaders5.1 Electoral results6 Notes 7 ReferencesFoundation[edit] In the 1920s the Liberal Party, although previously dominant in New Zealand party politics, seemed in serious long-term decline following the advent of the Labour Party, and its organisation had decayed to the point of collapse. The United Party represented an unexpected resurgence of the Liberals, and some historians consider it nothing more than the Liberal Party under a new name.[1] The United Party emerged from a faction of the decaying Liberal Party known as "the National Party" (not directly related to the modern National Party, although it may have inspired the name). George Forbes, a Liberal Party leader, led the faction
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New Zealand General Election, 1875–76
Daniel Pollen IndependentPrime Minister-designate Julius Vogel IndependentThe New Zealand
New Zealand
general election of 1875–76 was held between 20 December 1875 and 29 January 1876 to elect a total of 88 MPs in 73 electorates to the 6th session of the New Zealand
New Zealand
Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 4 and 15 January 1876
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New Zealand General Election, 1890
Harry Atkinson ConservativesElected Premier John Ballance LiberalThe New Zealand
New Zealand
general election of 1890 was one of New Zealand's most significant.[1] It marked the beginning of party politics in New Zealand with the formation of the Liberal Government, which was to enact major welfare, labour and electoral reforms, including giving the vote to women. It was also the first election in which there was no legal plural voting. Multi-member electorates were re-introduced in the four main centres and the 'country quota' (which gave more weight to rural votes) was increased to 28%. Following the election and the resignation of the previous government headed by Harry Atkinson, John Ballance
John Ballance
formed the first Liberal Party ministry, taking office on 24 January 1891
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New Zealand General Election, 1925
Gordon Coates ReformPrime Minister-designate Gordon Coates ReformThe New Zealand
New Zealand
general election of 1925 was held 4 November (the Māori vote had taken place the previous day) to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 22nd session of the New Zealand
New Zealand
Parliament. A total number of 678,877 (90.02%) voters turned out to vote. In one seat (Bay of Plenty) there was only one candidate.[1][2] In 1922, registration as an elector was made compulsory for all those eligible (except Māori).Contents1 Results1.1 Party totals 1.2 Votes summary 1.3 Electorate results2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksResults[edit] Gordon Coates continued as Prime Minister, with his Reform Party winning an outright majority of 30. Leonard Isitt and George Witty were both appointed to the Legislative Council by Gordon Coates on 28 October 1925; shortly before the election on 4 November
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New Zealand General Election, 1884
Harry Atkinson IndependentSubsequent Prime Minister Robert Stout IndependentThe New Zealand
New Zealand
general election of 1884 was held on 22 July to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 9th session of the New Zealand
New Zealand
Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 21 July.[1] A total number of 137,686 (60.6%) voters turned out to vote.[2] In 11 seats there was only one candidate.[3]Contents1 1881 electoral redistribution 2 Government formation 3 Results 4 Notes 5 References1881 electoral redistribution[edit] The same 95 electorates that were defined through the 1881 electoral redistribution were used for the 1884 election. The next electoral redistribution was held in 1887 in preparation for the 1887 election.[4] Government formation[edit] Prior to the election Harry Atkinson
Harry Atkinson
had served as Premier since 1883. His government was unpopular at the time and the polls went against him
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New Zealand General Election, 1881
John Hall IndependentSubsequent Prime Minister John Hall IndependentThe New Zealand
New Zealand
general election of 1881 was held on 8 and 9 December in the Māori and European electorates, respectively, to elect 95 MPs to the 8th session of the New Zealand
New Zealand
Parliament. 1881 was the first time a general election was held under universal male suffrage; all MPs were elected in single-member electorates; and the country quota was introduced, allowing rural electorates to have 25% fewer voters than urban electorates
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