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Internal Consistency Of The Bible
The question of the internal consistency of the Bible
Bible
concerns the coherence and textual integrity of the biblical scriptures
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Christianity In The United States
Christianity
Christianity
is the most adhered to religion in the United States, with 75% of polled American adults identifying themselves as Christian in 2015.[1][2] This is down from 85% in 1990, lower than 81.6% in 2001,[3] and slightly lower than 78% in 2012.[4] About 62% of those polled claim to be members of a church congregation.[5] The United States has the largest Christian
Christian
population in the world, with nearly 280 million Christians, although other countries have higher percentages of Christians
Christians
among their populations. The modern official motto of the United States
United States
of America, as established in a 1956 law signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, is "In God We Trust".[6][7][8] The phrase first appeared on U.S
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Westminster Confession Of Faith
The Westminster Confession of Faith
Westminster Confession of Faith
is a Reformed confession of faith. Drawn up by the 1646 Westminster Assembly
Westminster Assembly
as part of the Westminster Standards to be a confession of the Church of England, it became and remains the "subordinate standard" of doctrine in the Church of Scotland
Scotland
and has been influential within Presbyterian
Presbyterian
churches worldwide. In 1643, the English Parliament called upon "learned, godly and judicious Divines", to meet at Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
in order to provide advice on issues of worship, doctrine, government and discipline of the Church of England. Their meetings, over a period of five years, produced the confession of faith, as well as a Larger Catechism and a Shorter Catechism
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Jeremiah
Jeremiah
Jeremiah
(/dʒɛrɪˈmaɪ.ə/;[1] Hebrew: יִרְמְיָהוּ‬, Modern: Yirmeyahu  [jiʁmeˈjahu], Tiberian: Yirmĭyāhū; Greek: Ἰερεμίας; Arabic: إرميا‎ Irmiyā meaning "Yah Exalts"), also called the "Weeping prophet",[2] was one of the major prophets of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Old Testament). According to Jewish tradition, Jeremiah
Jeremiah
authored the Book of Jeremiah, the Books of Kings and the Book of Lamentations,[3] with the assistance and under the editorship of Baruch ben Neriah, his scribe and disciple. Greater detail is known about Jeremiah's life than for that of any other prophet
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Ezekiel
Ezekiel
Ezekiel
(/ɪˈziːkiəl/) (Hebrew: יְחֶזְקֵאל‬ Y'ḥezqēl [jəħɛzˈqēl]) is the central protagonist of the Book of Ezekiel
Book of Ezekiel
in the Hebrew Bible. In Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, Ezekiel
Ezekiel
is acknowledged as a Hebrew prophet
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Jonah
Jonah
Jonah
or Jonas[a] is the name given in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Tanakh/Old Testament) to a prophet of the northern kingdom of Israel in about the 8th century BCE. He is the eponymous central figure of the Book of Jonah, in which he is called upon by God
God
to travel to Nineveh
Nineveh
and warn its residents to repent of their sins or face divine wrath. Instead, Jonah
Jonah
boards a ship to Tarshish. Caught in a storm, he orders the ship's crew to cast him overboard, whereupon he is swallowed by a giant fish. Three days later, after Jonah
Jonah
agrees to go to Nineveh, the fish vomits him out onto the shore. Jonah
Jonah
successfully convinces the entire city of Nineveh
Nineveh
to repent, but waits outside the city in expectation of its destruction
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Psalms
The Book
Book
of Psalms
Psalms
(/sɑː(l)mz/ SAH(L)MZ, /sɔː(l)mz/ SAW(L)MZ; Hebrew: תְּהִלִּים‬ or תהילים‬, Tehillim, "praises"), commonly referred to simply as
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Book Of Lamentations
The Book
Book
of Lamentations (Hebrew: אֵיכָה‬, ‘Êykhôh, from its incipit meaning "how") is a collection of poetic laments for the destruction of Jerusalem.[1] In the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
it appears in the
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Books Of Chronicles
In the Christian Bible, the two Books of Chronicles
Books of Chronicles
(commonly referred to as 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, or First Chronicles and Second Chronicles) generally follow the two Books of Kings
Books of Kings
and precede Ezra–Nehemiah, thus concluding the history-oriented books of the Old Testament,[1] often referred to as the Deuteronomistic history. In the Hebrew Bible, Chronicles is a single book, called Diḇrê Hayyāmîm (Hebrew: דִּבְרֵי־הַיָּמִים‬, "The Matters [of] the Days"), and is the final book of Ketuvim, the third and last part of the Tanakh
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Old Testament
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
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Justin Martyr
Justin Martyr
Martyr
(Latin: Iustinus Martyr) was an early Christian apologist, and is regarded as the foremost interpreter of the theory of the Logos
Logos
in the 2nd century.[2] He was martyred, alongside some of his students, and is considered a saint by the Roman Catholic Church,[3] the Anglican Church,[4] the Eastern Orthodox Church,[5] and the Oriental Orthodox Churches. Most of his works are lost, but two apologies and a dialogue did survive. The First Apology, his most well known text, passionately defends the morality of the Christian life, and provides various ethical and philosophical arguments to convince the Roman emperor, Antoninus, to abandon the persecution of the fledgling sect
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Septuagint
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eFragment of a Septuagint: A column of uncial book from 1 Esdras
1 Esdras
in the Codex Vaticanus
Codex Vaticanus
c. 325–350 CE, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton's Greek edition and English translation.The Septuagint
Septuagint
(from the Latin
Latin
septuaginta, "seventy"), also known as the LXX, is a Koine Greek
Koine Greek
translation of a Hebraic textual tradition that included certain texts which were later included in the canonical Hebrew Bible
Bible
and other related texts which were not. As the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is also called the Greek Old Testament
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Thomas Aquinas
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t ePart of a series onChristianityJesus Christ Jesus
Jesus
in Christianity Son of God Virgin birth Ministry Crucifixion ResurrectionBible FoundationsOld Testament New Testament Gospel Canon Books Church Creed New CovenantTheologyGod TrinityFather Son Holy SpiritApologetics Baptism Christology History of theology Mission Patriology Pneumatology SalvationHistory TraditionMary Apostles Peter Paul Fathers Early Christianity Constantine Councils Augustine East–West Schism Crusades Aquinas Luther Reformation Radical Reformation<
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Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Mosaic Authorship
Mosaic authorship
Mosaic authorship
is the Jewish and Christian tradition that Moses
Moses
was the author of the Torah, the first f
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Eastern Orthodox
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe,
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