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Infidelity
Infidelity (synonyms include: cheating, adultery (when married), netorare (NTR), being unfaithful, or having an affair) is a violation of a couple's assumed or stated contract regarding emotional and/or sexual exclusivity.[1] Other scholars define infidelity as a violation according to the subjective feeling that one's partner has violated a set of rules or relationship norms; this violation results in feelings of sexual jealousy and rivalry.[2] What constitutes an act of infidelity depends upon the exclusivity expectations within the relationship.[3] In marital relationships, exclusivity expectations are commonly assumed, although they are not always met. When they are not met, research has found that psychological damage can occur, including feelings of rage and betrayal, lowering of sexual and personal confidence, and damage to self-image.[2] Depending on the context, men and women can experience social consequences if their act of infidelity becomes public
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Infidel
Infidel
Infidel
(literally "unfaithful") is a term used in certain religions for those accused of unbelief in the central tenets of their own religion, for members of another religion, or for the irreligious.[1][2] Infidel
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Human Mating Strategies
In evolutionary psychology and behavioral ecology, human mating strategies are a set of behaviors used by individuals to attract, select, and retain mates. Mating
Mating
strategies overlap with reproductive strategies, which encompass a broader set of behaviors involving the timing of reproduction and the trade-off between quantity and quality of offspring (see life history theory). Relative to other animals, human mating strategies are unique in their relationship with cultural variables such as the institution of marriage.[1] Humans may seek out individuals with the intention of forming a long-term intimate relationship, marriage, casual relationship, or friendship. The human desire for companionship is one of the strongest human drives. It is an innate feature of human nature, and may be related to the sex drive
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Meta-analysis
A meta-analysis is a statistical analysis that combines the results of multiple scientific studies. The basic tenet behind meta-analyses is that there is a common truth behind all conceptually similar scientific studies, but which has been measured with a certain error within individual studies. The aim then is to use approaches from statistics to derive a pooled estimate closest to the unknown common truth based on how this error is perceived. In essence, all existing methods yield a weighted average from the results of the individual studies and what differs is the manner in which these weights are allocated and also the manner in which the uncertainty is computed around the point estimate thus generated
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Attachment Theory
Attachment theory
Attachment theory
is a psychological model that attempts to describe the dynamics of long-term and short-term interpersonal relationships between humans. However, "attachment theory is not formulated as a general theory of relationships. It addresses only a specific facet":[1] how human beings respond within relationships when hurt, separated from loved ones, or perceiving a threat.[2] Essentially all infants become attached if provided any caregiver, but there are individual differences in the quality of the relationships. In infants, attachment as a motivational and behavioral system directs the child to seek proximity with a familiar caregiver when they are alarmed, with the expectation that they will receive protection and emotional support
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Attachment Styles
Attachment theory
Attachment theory
is a psychological model that attempts to describe the dynamics of long-term and short-term interpersonal relationships between humans. However, "attachment theory is not formulated as a general theory of relationships. It addresses only a specific facet":[1] how human beings respond within relationships when hurt, separated from loved ones, or perceiving a threat.[2] Essentially all infants become attached if provided any caregiver, but there are individual differences in the quality of the relationships. In infants, attachment as a motivational and behavioral system directs the child to seek proximity with a familiar caregiver when they are alarmed, with the expectation that they will receive protection and emotional support
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Vasopressin Receptor 1A
1YTVIdentifiersAliases AVPR1A, AVPR V1a, AVPR1, V1aR, arginine vasopressin receptor 1AExternal IDs OMIM: 600821 MGI: 1859216 HomoloGene: 568 GeneCards: AVPR1AGene location (Human)Chr. Chromosome
Chromosome
12 (human)[1]Band 12q14.2 Start 63,142,759 bp[1]End 63,150,942 bp[1]Gene location (Mouse)Chr. Chromosome
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Danish Society
The culture of Denmark
Denmark
has a rich intellectual and artistic heritage. The astronomical discoveries of Tycho Brahe
Tycho Brahe
(1546–1601), Ludwig A. Colding's (1815–1888) neglected articulation of the principle of conservation of energy, and the foundational contributions to atomic physics of Niels Bohr
Niels Bohr
(1885–1962); in this century Lene Vestergaard Hau (born 1959) in quantum physics involving the stopping of light, advances in nano-technology, and contributions to the understanding of Bose-Einstein Condensates, demonstrate the range and endurance of Danish scientific achievement
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Christianity In The United States
Christianity
Christianity
is the most adhered to religion in the United States, with 75% of polled American adults identifying themselves as Christian in 2015.[1][2] This is down from 85% in 1990, lower than 81.6% in 2001,[3] and slightly lower than 78% in 2012.[4] About 62% of those polled claim to be members of a church congregation.[5] The United States has the largest Christian
Christian
population in the world, with nearly 280 million Christians, although other countries have higher percentages of Christians
Christians
among their populations. The modern official motto of the United States
United States
of America, as established in a 1956 law signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, is "In God We Trust".[6][7][8] The phrase first appeared on U.S
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Protestants
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a]
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Catholics
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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African American
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era
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Tribal Culture
A tribe is viewed developmentally, economically, and/or historically, as a social group existing outside of or before the development of states. A tribe is a group of distinct people, dependent on their land for their livelihood, who are largely self-sufficient, and not integrated into the national society. It is perhaps the term most readily understood and used by the general public to describe such communities
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Evolutionary Psychology
Evolutionary psychology
Evolutionary psychology
is a theoretical approach in the social and natural sciences that examines psychological structure from a modern evolutionary perspective. It seeks to identify which human psychological traits are evolved adaptations – that is, the functional products of natural selection or sexual selection in human evolution. Adaptationist thinking about physiological mechanisms, such as the heart, lungs, and immune system, is common in evolutionary biology. Some evolutionary psychologists apply the same thinking to psychology, arguing that the modularity of mind is similar to that of the body and with different modular adaptations serving different functions
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Pathogen
In biology, a pathogen (Greek: πάθος pathos "suffering, passion" and -γενής -genēs "producer of") or a germ in the oldest and broadest sense is anything that can produce disease; the term came into use in the 1880s.[1][2] Typically the term is used to describe an infectious agent such as a virus, bacterium, protozoa, prion, a fungus, or other micro-organism.[3][4] The scientific study of pathogens is called Pathology. There are several substrates including pathways where the pathogens can invade a host. The principal pathways have different episodic time frames, but soil contamination has the longest or most persistent potential for harboring a pathogen
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Cantina
A cantina is a type of bar popular in Mexico
Mexico
and Spain. The word is similar in etymology to "canteen", and is derived from the Italian word for a cellar, winery, or vault.[1] In Italy, a cantina refers to a room below the ground level where wine and other products such as salami are stored.[2] The term cantina entered the French language
French language
circa 1710[citation needed] as cantine. It was used originally to refer to the shop of a sutler.Contents1 Types of cantinas1.1 Spain 1.2 Mexico 1.3 United States2 See also 3 References 4 External linksTypes of cantinas[edit]An osteria at Castel del Piano, TuscanySpain[edit] In Spain, a cantina is a bar located in a train station or any establishment located at or near a workplace where food and drinks are served. Cantina
Cantina
was one of the foreign words that entered in from Renaissance Italy
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