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Indus Valley Civilization
The Indus Valley Civilisation
Indus Valley Civilisation
(IVC), or Harappan Civilisation,[1] was a Bronze Age
Bronze Age
civilisation (3300–1300 BCE; mature period 2600–1900 BCE) m
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Black And Red Ware Culture
The black and red ware culture (BRW) is a late Bronze Age
Bronze Age
and early Iron Age
Iron Age
archaeological culture of the northern and central Indian subcontinent, associated with the Vedic civilization. In the Western Ganges
Ganges
plain (western Uttar Pradesh) it is dated to c. 1450-1200 BCE, and is succeeded by the Painted Grey Ware
Painted Grey Ware
culture; whereas in the Central and Eastern Ganges
Ganges
plain (eastern Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and Bengal) and Central India (Madhya Pradesh) the BRW appears during the same period but continues for longer, until c. 700-500 BCE, when it is succeeded by the Northern Black Polished Ware culture.[1] In the Western Ganges
Ganges
plain, the BRW was preceded by the Ochre Coloured Pottery culture
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Chola Dynasty
List of Chola
Chola
kings and emperorsEarly CholasEllalan Kulakkottan Ilamchetchenni Karikala Nedunkilli Nalankilli Killivalavan Kopperuncholan Kochchenganan PerunarkilliInterregnum (c. 200 – c. 848)Medieval CholasVijayalaya 848–891(?)Aditya I 891–907Parantaka I 907–950Gandaraditya 950–957Arinjaya 956–957Sundara (Parantaka II) 957–970Aditya II (co-regent)Uttama 970–985Rajaraja I 985–1014Rajendra I 1012–1044Rajadhiraja 1044–1054Rajendra II 1054–1063Virarajendra 1063–1070Athi
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Haryanka Dynasty
The Haryanka dynasty
Haryanka dynasty
was the second ruling dynasty of Magadha, an ancient kingdom in India, which succeeded the mythological Barhadratha dynasty. The reign of this dynasty probably began in the middle of 6th century BCE. Initially, the capital was Rajagriha. Later, it was shifted to Pataliputra, near the present day Patna
Patna
in India. Around 566 BC, Brihadaratha founded the dynasty, although Bimbisara, his grandson, established it successfully in 544 BC and ruled upto 492 BC. Thus, Bimbisara
Bimbisara
is considered as the main founder of this dynasty himself. His father was Bhattiya. According to the Buddhist text, the Mahavamsa, Bimbisara
Bimbisara
was anointed king by his father at the age of fifteen.[2] According to George Turnour and N.L
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Three Crowned Kings
The Three Crowned rulers, or the Three Glorified by Heaven,[1] or World of the Three,[2] primarily known as Moovendhar, refers to the triumvirate of Chola, Chera and Pandya
Pandya
who dominated the politics of the ancient Tamil country, Tamilakam, from their three countries or Nadu of Chola
Chola
Nadu,
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Achaemenid Empire
The Achaemenid Empire
Empire
(/əˈkiːmənɪd/ c. 550–330 BC), also called the First Persian Empire,[11] was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great. Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans
Balkans
and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 million square kilometers. Incorporating various peoples of different origins and faiths, it is notable for its successful model of a centralised, bureaucratic administration (through satraps under the King of Kings), for building infrastructure such as road systems and a postal system, the use of an official language across its territories, and the development of civil services and a large professional army
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Shishunaga Dynasty
The Shishunaga dynasty is believed to have been the second ruling dynasty of Magadha, an empire of ancient India. According to the Puranas, this dynasty was the second ruling dynasty of Magadha, succeeding the legendary dynasty founded by Brihadratha.[2] Shishunaga, the founder of the dynasty, was initially an amatya or "minister" of the last Haryanka dynasty
Haryanka dynasty
ruler Nāgadāsaka and ascended to the throne after a popular rebellion in c. 413 BCE.[3] The capital of this dynasty initially was Rajgir; but later shifted to Pataliputra, near the present day Patna, during the reign of Kakavarna. According to tradition, Kakavarna was succeeded by his ten sons.[4] This dynasty was succeeded by the Nanda Empire
Nanda Empire
in c
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Seleucid Empire
The Seleucid Empire
Empire
(/sɪˈljuːsɪd/;[6] Ancient Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Σελευκιδῶν, Basileía tōn Seleukidōn) was a Hellenistic
Hellenistic
state ruled by the Seleucid dynasty, which existed from 312 BC to 63 BC; Seleucus I Nicator
Seleucus I Nicator
founded it following the division of the Macedonian empire vastly expanded by Alexander the Great.[7][8][9][10] Seleucus received Babylonia
Babylonia
(321 BC), and from there, expanded his dominions to include much of Alexander's near-eastern territories
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Jorwe Culture
The Jorwe
Jorwe
culture was a Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
archaeological culture which existed in large areas of what is now Maharashtra
Maharashtra
state in Western India, and also reached north into the Malwa
Malwa
region of Madhya Pradesh. It is named after the type site of Jorwe. The early phase of the culture is dated to c. 1400-1000 BCE, while the late phase is dated to c. 1000-700 BCE.[1] Over 200 settlements of the Jorwe
Jorwe
culture have been found, ranging from several large and medium-sized farming villages, to many small villages, as well as temporary and seasonal camp-sites used by pastoralists. It likely reflects a chiefdom level of social organization. The largest settlement was Daimabad, which had a mud fortification during this period, as well as an elliptical temple with fire pits
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Malwa Culture
The Malwa
Malwa
culture was a Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
archaeological culture which existed in the Malwa
Malwa
region of Central India and parts of Maharashtra in the Deccan Peninsula. It is mainly dated to c. 1600 – c. 1300 BCE,[1] but calibrated radiocarbon dates have suggested that the beginning of this culture may be as early as c. 2000-1750 BCE.[2]Ceramic goblet from Navdatoli, Malwa, 1300 BCE.This culture is characterized by the increasing dominance of the agricultural way of life, but also incorporated pastoralist and hunting groups. The people cultivated wheat, barley, legumes, and later rice, and domesticated cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs
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Pandu Rajar Dhibi
Pandu
Pandu
Rajar Dhibi (Bengali: পাণ্ডু রাজার ঢিপি) is an archaeological site in Ausgram II
Ausgram II
block in the Sadar North subdivision of Purba Bardhaman district
Purba Bardhaman district
in the Indian state of West Bengal. It was the first Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
site discovered in West Bengal. The common man believes that the main mound at Pandu Rajar Dhibi is associated with King Pandu
Pandu
mentioned in the epic Mahabharata, hence the name came into being from the folklore .[1][2]Contents1 Location 2 Excavations 3 The People and Their Culture 4 Significance 5 Limitations 6 ReferencesLocation[edit] It is located near the southern bank of Ajay River and excavations have been made near Rajpotdanga and Panduk villages.[1][2] Excavations[edit] The site was first excavated by B.B
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Chalcolithic
Near East Ghassulian
Ghassulian
culture, Naqada culture, Uruk periodEuropeYamna culture, Corded Ware Cernavodă culture, Decea Mureşului culture, Gorneşti culture, Gumelniţa–Karanovo culture, Petreşti culture, Coțofeni culture Remedello culture, Gaudo culture, Monte Claro cultureCentral AsiaYamna culture, Botai culture, BMAC culture, Afanasevo cultureSouth AsiaPeriodisation of the Indus Valley
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Pradyota Dynasty
Pradyota dynasty is an ancient Indian dynasty, which ruled over Avanti in the present-day Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh
state, though most of the Puranas (except a manuscript of the Brahmanda Purana, preserved in the University of Dhaka) say that this dynasty succeeded the Barhadratha dynasty in Magadha.[1]Contents1 History 2 Rulers 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 SourcesHistory[edit] According to the Vayu Purana, Pradyotas of Avanti annexed Magadha
Magadha
and ruled there for 138 years from 799–684 BCE. Palaka, the son of the Avanti king Pradyota, conquered Kaushambi, making the kingdom powerful.[citation needed] According to both Buddhist
Buddhist
texts and Jain
Jain
texts, one of the Pradyota traditions was that the king's son kill his father to become the successor. During this time, it is reported that crimes were commonplace in Magadha
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Chera Dynasty
Maritime contacts Sangam period Tamilakam Cheras Ays Ezhil Malai Confluence of religions Venad
Venad
- Kingdom of Quilon Calicut Kolattunadu Cochin Minor principalities Portuguese period Dutch period Rise of Travancore Mysorean interlude British Period Battle of Quilon Communism in Kerala Unification of KeralaOther topics Geography Economy Architecture Fortsv t ePart of a series onHistory of Tamil NaduMainTamiḻakam Chronology of Tamil history List of Tamil monarchsSangam periodSources Three Crowned Kings Education Legal syst
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Pallava Dynasty
The Pallava dynasty
Pallava dynasty
was a South Indian dynasty that existed from 275 CE to 897 CE, ruling a portion of what is today southern India. They gained prominence after the eclipse of the Satavahana dynasty, whom the Pallavas served as feudatories.[2][3] Pallavas became a major power during the reign of Mahendravarman I (571 – 630 CE) and Narasimhavarman I
Narasimhavarman I
(630 – 668 CE) and dominated the Telugu and northern parts of the Tamil region for about 600 years until the end of the 9th century
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Soanian
The Soanian
Soanian
is an archaeological culture of the Lower Paleolithic
Lower Paleolithic
in the Siwalik region of the Indian subcontinent.[1] Contemporary to the Acheulean, it is named after the Soan Valley in Pakistan. Soanian sites are found along the Sivalik region in present-day India, Nepal and Pakistan.[2]Contents1 Findings 2 Spread across Shivalik Hills region 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksFindings[edit]ChauntraKhasala KalanSivalik HillsSoan RiverMap of the Indian Subcontinent
Indian Subcontinent
showing important sites of the Soanian culture.The term "Soan Culture" was first used by Hellmut De Terra in 1936,[3] but D. N
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