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Indo-Islamic Architecture
Indo- Islamic architecture
Islamic architecture
is the architecture of the Indian subcontinent produced for Islamic patrons and purposes. Despite an earlier Muslim presence in Sindh
Sindh
in modern Pakistan, its main history begins when Muhammad of Ghor
Muhammad of Ghor
made Delhi
Delhi
a Muslim capital in 1193. Both the Delhi
Delhi
Sultans and the Mughal dynasty
Mughal dynasty
that succeeded them came from Central Asia
Central Asia
via Afghanistan, and were used to a Central Asian style of Islamic architecture
Islamic architecture
that largely derived from Iran.[1] The types and forms of large buildings required by Muslim elites, with mosques and tombs much the most common, were very different from those previously built in India
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Tomb Of Shah Rukn-e-Alam
The Tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam
Rukn-e-Alam
(Urdu: مقبرہ شاہ رکن عالم‬‎) located in Multan, Pakistan, is the mausoleum of the Sufi
Sufi
saint Sheikh Rukn-ud-Din Abul Fateh. The shrine is considered to be the earliest example of Tughluq architecture,[1] and is of the most impressive shrines in the Subcontinent.[2] The shrine attracts over 100,000 pilgrims to the annual urs festival that commemorates his death.[3]Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Layout 4 Architecture4.1 Mausoleum 4.2 Decorative elements 4.3 Interior5 Conservation 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External linksLocation[edit] The tomb is located in the ancient city of Multan, in central Pakistan
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Fluting (architecture)
Fluting in architecture is the shallow grooves running vertically along a surface. The term typically refers to the grooves running on a column shaft or a pilaster, but need not necessarily be restricted to those two applications. If the hollowing out of material meets in a point, the point is called an arris. If the lower half of the hollowed-out grooves appear to have been re-filled with a cylindrical element, it may be referred to as "cabled fluting".[1] See also[edit]Fluting (geology)References[edit]^ "Fluting." Dictionary of Architecture
Architecture
& Landscape Architecture. John Fleming, Hugh Honour, and Nikolaus Pevsner. 5th ed. (London: Penguin, 1999).External links[edit]University of Pittsburgh - "fluting" from the Medieval Art and Architecture
Architecture
glossaryThis architectural element–related article is a stub
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South Asia
South
South
Asia
Asia
or Southern Asia
Asia
(also known as Indian subcontinent) is a term used to represent the southern region of the Asian continent, which comprises the sub-Himalayan SAARC
SAARC
countries and, for some authorities, adjoining countries to the west and east. Topographically, it is dominated by the Indian Plate, which rises above sea level as Nepal
Nepal
and all parts of India
India
situated south of the Himalayas
Himalayas
and the Hindu
Hindu
Kush
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Banbhore
Banbhore
Banbhore
or Bhambore (Urdu: بنبهور‬‎), is an ancient city dating to the 1st century BC located in Sindh, Pakistan.[1][2] The city ruins lie on the N-5 National Highway, east of Karachi
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Qutb Al-Din Aibak
Quṭb al-Dīn Aibak[2] also spelt Quṭb ud-Dīn Aibak or Qutub ud-Din Aybak, (1150–1210), was the founder of the Mamluk dynasty and the first sultan of the Delhi
Delhi
Sultanate.Contents1 History1.1 Works 1.2 Death and successor2 ReferencesHistory[edit] Quṭb al-Din Aibak was born to Turkic parents in Turkistan. In his childhood, Aibak was sold as a slave and raised at Nishapur, Persia, where he was purchased by the local Qazi.[1] After the death of his master, he was sold by his master's son and eventually became a slave of Muhammad of Ghor
Muhammad of Ghor
who made him the Amir-i-Akhur, the Master of Slave.[1] Eventually, Aibak was appointed to military command and became an able general of Muhammad of Ghor. In 1193 and after conquering Delhi,[1] his master returned to Khorāsān and left the consolidation of the Ghūrid conquests in northwest India to him
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British Raj
Indian languagesGovernment ColonyMonarch of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Emperor/Empressa •  1858–1901 Victoria •  1901–1910 Edward VII •  1910–1936 George V •  1936 Edward VIII •  1936–1947 George VI Viceroy
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Jain
Jainism
Jainism
(/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/),[1] traditionally known as Jain
Jain
Dharma,[2] is an ancient Indian religion.[3] Followers of Jainism
Jainism
are called "Jains", a word derived from the Sanskrit word jina (victor) and connoting the path of victory in crossing over life's stream of rebirths through an ethical and spiritual life.[4] Jains
Jains
trace their history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviors and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who is believed to have lived millions of years ago, and twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra
Mahāvīra
around 500 BCE
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Architecture Of Bangladesh
Genres Bengal
Bengal
studies Poetry Novels Science fictionInstitutionsBangla AcademyAwards Bangla Academy
Bangla Academy
Literary Award Ekushey Pad
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Multan
Multan
Multan
(Punjabi, Saraiki, Urdu: مُلتان ‬‎ [mʊltaːn] ( listen)), is a Pakistani city and the headquarters of Multan District
Multan District
in the province of Punjab. Located on the banks of the Chenab River, Multan
Multan
is Pakistan's seventh most populous city,[4][5] and is the major cultural and economic centre of southern Punjab. Multan's history stretches deep into antiquity. The ancient city was site of the renowned Multan
Multan
Sun Temple, and was besieged by Alexander the Great during the Mallian Campaign.[6] Multan
Multan
was one of the most important trading centres of medieval Islamic India,[7] and attracted a multitude of Sufi
Sufi
mystics in the 11th and 12th centuries, earning the city the nickname City of Saints
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Minaret Of Jam
The Minaret
Minaret
of Jam is a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in western Afghanistan. It is located in a remote and nearly inaccessible region of the Shahrak District, Ghor Province, next to the Hari River. The 62-metre (203 ft) high minaret[1] was built around 1190 entirely of baked bricks and is famous for its intricate brick, stucco and glazed tile decoration, which consists of alternating bands of kufic and naskhi calligraphy, geometric patterns, and verses from the Qur'an
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Masonry
Masonry
Masonry
is the building of structures from individual units, which are often laid in and bound together by mortar; the term masonry can also refer to the units themselves. The common materials of masonry construction are brick, building stone such as marble, granite, travertine, and limestone, cast stone, concrete block, glass block, and adobe. Masonry
Masonry
is generally a highly durable form of construction. However, the materials used, the quality of the mortar and workmanship, and the pattern in which the units are assembled can substantially affect the durability of the overall masonry construction
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Brick
A brick is building material used to make walls, pavements and other elements in masonry construction. Traditionally, the term brick referred to a unit composed of clay, but it is now used to denote any rectangular units laid in mortar. A brick can be composed of clay-bearing soil, sand, and lime, or concrete materials. Bricks are produced in numerous classes, types, materials, and sizes which vary with region and time period, and are produced in bulk quantities. Two basic categories of bricks are fired and non-fired bricks. Block is a similar term referring to a rectangular building unit composed of similar materials, but is usually larger than a brick. Lightweight bricks (also called lightweight blocks) are made from expanded clay aggregate. Fired bricks are one of the longest-lasting and strongest building materials, sometimes referred to as artificial stone, and have been used since circa 4000 BC
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Islamic World
The terms Muslim
Muslim
world and Islamic world commonly refer to the unified Islamic community (Ummah), consisting of all those who adhere to the religion of Islam,[1] or to societies where Islam
Islam
is practiced.[2][3] In a modern geopolitical sense, these terms refer to countries where Islam
Islam
is widespread, although there are no agreed criteria for inclusion.[4][3] Some scholars and commentators have criticised the term 'Muslim/Islamic world' and its derivative terms 'Muslim/Islamic country' as "simplistic" and "binary", since no state has a religiously homogeneous population (e.g. Egypt's citizens are c
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Hindu Temple
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Hindu Temple Architecture
Hindu temple
Hindu temple
architecture has many varieties of style, though the basic nature of the Hindu temple
Hindu temple
remains the same, with the essential feature an inner sanctum, the garbha griha or womb-chamber, where the primary Murti
Murti
or the image of a deity is housed in a simple bare cell. Around this chamber there are often other structures and buildings, in the largest cases covering several acres. On the exterior, the garbhagriha is crowned by a tower-like shikhara, also called the vimana in the south. The shrine building often includes an ambulatory for parikrama (circumambulation), a mandapa congregation hall, and sometimes an antarala antechamber and porch between garbhagriha and mandapa
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