HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

German Language

German (Deutsch, pronounced [dɔʏtʃ] (listen))[nb 4] is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol in Italy, the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The German language is most similar to other languages within the West Germanic language branch, including Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. It also contains close similarities in vocabulary to Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although they belong to the North Germanic group
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Burgrave
Burgrave also rendered as Burggrave[1][2] (from German: Burggraf,[1] Latin: burgravius, burggravius, burcgravius, burgicomes, also praefectus), was since the medieval period in Europe (mainly Germany) the official title for the ruler of a castle, especially a royal or episcopal castle, and its territory called a Burgraviate or Burgravate (German Burggrafschaft also Burggrafthum, Latin praefectura).[1][3][4] The burgrave was a "count" in rank (German Graf, Latin comes)[2] equipped with judicial powers,[3][4] under the direct authority of the Emperor or King, or of a territorial imperial state—a prince-bishop or territorial lord
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Nuremberg Chronicle
The Nuremberg Chronicle is an illustrated encyclopedia consisting of world historical accounts, as well as accounts told through biblical paraphrase. Subjects include human history in relation to the bible, illustrated mythological creatures, and the histories of important Christian and secular cities from antiquity. Finished in 1493 after years in the making, it was originally written in Latin by Hartmann Schedel, and a German version was translated by Georg Alt. It is one of the best-documented early printed books—an incunabulum—and one of the first to successfully integrate illustrations and text. Latin scholars refer to it as Liber Chronicarum (Book of Chronicles) as this phrase appears in the index introduction of the Latin edition. English-speakers have long referred to it as the Nuremberg Chronicle after the city in which it was published
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



St. Lorenz, Nuremberg
St. Lorenz (St. Lawrence) is a medieval church of the former free imperial city of Nuremberg in southern Germany. It is dedicated to Saint Lawrence. The church was badly damaged during the Second World War and later restored. It is one of the most prominent churches of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Bavaria. The nave of the church was completed by around 1400. In 1439, work began on the choir in the form of a hall church in the late German Sondergotik style of Gothic architecture. The choir was largely completed by 1477 by Konrad Roriczer,[1] although Jakob Grimm completed the intricate vaults. In the choir one can find the carving of the Angelic Salutation by Veit Stoss, and the monumental tabernacle by Adam Kraft. The latter includes a prominent figure of the sculptor himself. The building and furnishing of the church was cared of by the city council and by wealthy citizens
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Stem Duchy
A stem duchy (German: Stammesherzogtum, from Stamm, meaning "tribe", in reference to the Germanic tribes of the Franks, Saxons, Bavarians and Swabians) was a constituent duchy of the Kingdom of Germany at the time of the extinction of the Carolingian dynasty (the death of Louis the Child in 911) and through the transitional period leading to the formation of the Holy Roman Empire later in the 10th century. The Carolingians had dissolved the original tribal duchies of the Frankish Empire in the 8th century. As the Carolingian Empire declined in the late 9th century, the old tribal areas assumed new identities as subdivisions of the realm. These are the five stem duchies (sometimes also called "younger stem duchies" in contrast to the pre-Carolingian tribal duchies): Bavaria, Franconia, Lotharingia (Lorraine), Saxony and Swabia (Alemannia)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

East Francia

East Francia (Latin: Francia orientalis) or the Kingdom of the East Franks (regnum Francorum orientalium) was a successor state of Charlemagne's empire ruled by the Carolingian dynasty until 911. It was created through the Treaty of Verdun (843) which divided the former empire into three kingdoms.[a] The east–west division, enforced by the German-Latin language split, "gradually hardened into the establishment of separate kingdoms",[1] with East Francia becoming the Kingdom of Germany and West Francia the Kingdom of France.[2][3]

The partition of the Carolingian Empire by the Treaty of Verdun in 843. From Histoire Et Géographie - Atlas Général Vidal-Lablache, 1898.
In August 843, after three years of civil war following the death of emperor Louis the Pious on 20 June 840, the Treaty of Verdun was signed by his three sons and heirs
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



March Of The Nordgau
The Margraviate of the Nordgau (German: Markgrafschaft Nordgau) or Bavarian Nordgau (Bayerischer Nordgau) was a medieval administrative unit (Gau) on the frontier of the German Duchy of Bavaria. It comprised the region north of the Danube and Regensburg (Ratisbon), roughly covered by the modern Upper Palatinate stretching up to the river Main[1] and, especially after 1061, into the Egerland on the border with Bohemia. The area east of Franconia proper up to the Bohemian Forest had been settled by Germanic Varisci and Armalausi tribes in ancient times; after the Migration Period the forces of the proto-Merovingian king Chlodio (died c. 450) occupied the district. From the mid-6th century onwards, the region was Christianised by several wandering bishops, among them Saints Boniface (lived c. 675 to 754) and Emmeram of Regensburg. In 739 the Diocese of Regensburg was founded
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Conrad III Of Germany

Conrad III (German: Konrad; Italian: Corrado; 1093 or 1094 – 15 February 1152) of the Hohenstaufen dynasty was from 1116 to 1120 Duke of Franconia, from 1127 to 1135 anti-king of his predecessor King Lothair III and from 1138 until his death in 1152 King in the Holy Roman Empire. He was the son of Duke Frederick I of Swabia and Agnes,[1] a daughter of the Salian Emperor Henry IV.[2][3]

The origin of the House of Hohenstaufen in the Duchy of Swabia has not been conclusively established. As the name came from the Hohenstaufen Castle (built in 1105) Conrad's great-grandfather Frederick of Staufen was count in the Riesgau and in 1053 became Swabian Count palatine
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Confederation Of The Rhine
The Confederation of the Rhine (German: Rheinbund; French: officially États confédérés du Rhin (Confederated States of the Rhine), but in practice Confédération du Rhin) was a confederation of German client states at the behest of the First French Empire. It was formed from parts of the Holy Roman Empire by Napoleon after he defeated Austria and Russia at the Battle of Austerlitz. The Treaty of Pressburg, in effect, led to the creation of the Confederation of the Rhine, which lasted from 1806 to 1813.[1] The members of the confederation were German princes (Fürsten) formerly within the Holy Roman Empire
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Hohenstaufen
The Hohenstaufen (/ˈhənʃtfən/ HOH-ən-shtow-fən, US also /ˌhənˈʃtfən, -st-/ -⁠S(H)TOW-fən,[2][3][4][5] German: [ˌhoːənˈʃtaʊfn̩]), also called Staufer, was a noble dynasty of unclear origin that rose to rule the Duchy of Swabia from 1079 and to royal rule in the Holy Roman Empire during the Middle Ages from 1138 until 1254.[6] The most prominent kings Frederick I (1155), Henry VI (1191) and Frederick II (1220) ascended the imperial throne and also ruled Italy and Burgundy
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]