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Imagawa Ujizane
Imagawa Ujizane
Imagawa Ujizane
(今川 氏真, 1538 – January 27, 1615) was a Japanese daimyō who lived in the Sengoku through early Edo periods. He was the tenth head of the Imagawa clan, and was a son of Imagawa Yoshimoto and the father of Imagawa Norimochi and Shinagawa
Shinagawa
Takahisa.Contents1 Early life 2 Fall of the Imagawa clan 3 Later Years and Death 4 Family 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Ujizane was born in Sunpu Domain; he was the eldest son of Imagawa Yoshimoto. In 1554, he married the daughter of Hōjō Ujiyasu
Hōjō Ujiyasu
(Lady Hayakawa) as part of the Kai-Sagami-Suruga Alliance
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Japanese Name
Japanese names (日本人の氏名, Nihonjin no Shimei) in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name. More than one given name is not generally used. Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation
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Kenjutsu
Kenjutsu
Kenjutsu
(剣術) is the umbrella term for all (koryū) schools of Japanese swordsmanship, in particular those that predate the Meiji Restoration
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Ashikaga Yoshiteru
Ashikaga Yoshiteru
Ashikaga Yoshiteru
(足利 義輝, March 31, 1536 – June 17, 1565), also known as Yoshifushi or Yoshifuji, was the 13th shōgun of the Ashikaga shogunate
Ashikaga shogunate
who reigned from 1546 to 1565 during the late Muromachi period
Muromachi period
of Japan. He was the eldest son of the 12th shōgun, Ashikaga Yoshiharu; and his mother was a daughter of Konoe Hisamichi (later called 慶寿院 Keijuin). When he became shogun in 1546 at age 11, Yoshiteru's name was Yoshifushi (sometimes translitrated as Yoshifuji);[1] but some years later in 1554, he changed his name to the one by which he is conventionally known today.[2] His childhood name was Kikubemaru (菊童丸)
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Ashikaga Yoshihide
Ashikaga Yoshihide (足利 義栄, 1538 – October 28, 1568) was the 14th shōgun of the Ashikaga shogunate
Ashikaga shogunate
who held nominal power for a few months in 1568 during the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
of Japan. When he became shōgun, he changed his name to Yoshinaga, but he is more conventionally recognized today by the name Yoshihide.[1] Eiroku
Eiroku
11, in the 2nd month (1568): Yoshihide became Sei-i Taishōgun three years after the death of his cousin, the thirteenth shōgun Ashikaga Yoshiteru.[2]Contents1 Family 2 Events of Yoshihide's bakufu 3 Era of Yoshihide's bakufu 4 Notes 5 ReferencesFamily[edit]Father: Ashikaga Yoshitsuna Mother: daughter of Ouchi Yoshiyuki Wife: Yuki no TsuboneEvents of Yoshihide's bakufu[edit] Shortly after having been proclaimed shōgun, Yoshihide died from a contagious disease
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Ashikaga Yoshiaki
Ashikaga Yoshiaki
Ashikaga Yoshiaki
(足利 義昭, December 5, 1537 – October 19, 1597)[1] was the 15th shōgun of the Ashikaga shogunate
Ashikaga shogunate
in Japan who reigned from 1568 to 1573.[2] His father,
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Tokugawa Hidetada
Among Others...ParentsTokugawa Ieyasu Saigō-no-Tsubone Tokugawa Hidetada
Tokugawa Hidetada
(徳川 秀忠, May 2, 1579 – March 14, 1632) was the second shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1605 until his abdication in 1623. He was the third son of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate.Contents1 Early life (1579–1593) 2 Military achievements (1593–1605) 3 Shōgun
Shōgun
(1605–1623) 4 Ogosho (1623–1632) 5 Honours 6 Eras 7 Family 8 Notable descendants 9 Notes 10 ReferencesEarly life (1579–1593)[edit] Tokugawa Hidetada
Tokugawa Hidetada
was born to Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
and the Lady Saigō
Lady Saigō
(the first of his many consorts) on May 2, 1579
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Emperor Of Japan
The Emperor
Emperor
of Japan
Japan
is the head of the Imperial Family and the traditional head of state of Japan. Under the 1947 constitution, he is defined as "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people." Historically, he was also the highest authority of the Shinto religion. In Japanese, the Emperor
Emperor
is called Tennō (天皇), which translates to "heavenly sovereign". In English, the use of the term Mikado (帝 or 御門) for the Emperor
Emperor
was once common, but is now considered obsolete.[1] Currently, the Emperor
Emperor
of Japan
Japan
is the only head of state in the world with the English title of "Emperor"
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Emperor Go-Kashiwabara
Emperor Go-Kashiwabara
Emperor Go-Kashiwabara
(後柏原天皇 Go-Kashiwabara-tennō) (November 19, 1462 – May 19, 1526) was the 104th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. He reigned from November 16, 1500, to May 19, 1526. His personal name was Katsuhito (勝仁). His reign marked the nadir of Imperial authority during the Ashikaga shogunate.[1]Contents1 Genealogy 2 Events of Go-Kashiwabara's life2.1 Kugyō3 Eras of Go-Kashiwabara's reign 4 Ancestry 5 Notes 6 References 7 See alsoGenealogy[edit] He was the first son of Emperor Go-Tsuchimikado
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Emperor Go-Nara
Go-Nara (後奈良天皇 Go-Nara-tennō) (January 26, 1495 – September 27, 1557) was the 105th Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. He reigned from June 9, 1526 until his death in 1557, during the Sengoku
Sengoku
period. His personal name was Tomohito (知仁).[1] In older English literature, he may also be referred to as Nara II.Contents1 Genealogy 2 Events of Go-Nara's life2.1 Kugyō3 Eras of Go-Nara's reign 4 Ancestry 5 Notes 6 References 7 See alsoGenealogy[edit] He was the second son of Emperor Go-Kashiwabara
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Emperor Ōgimachi
Emperor Ōgimachi
Emperor Ōgimachi
(正親町天皇 Ōgimachi-tennō) (June 18, 1517 – February 6, 1593) was the 106th Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. He reigned from October 27, 1557, to his abdication on December 17, 1586, corresponding to the transition between the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
and the Azuchi–Momoyama period
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Emperor Go-Yōzei
Emperor Go-Yōzei
Emperor Go-Yōzei
(後陽成天皇, Go-Yōzei-tennō, December 31, 1571 – September 25, 1617) was the 107th Emperor of Japan,[1] according to the traditional order of succession.[2] Go-Yōzei's reign spanned the years 1586 through to his abdication in 1611,[3] corresponding to the transition between the Azuchi–Momoyama period and the Edo period. This 16th-century sovereign was named after the 9th-century Emperor Yōzei, and go- (後), translates as later, and thus, he could be called the "Later Emperor Yōzei"
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Hikita Bungorō
Hikita Bungorō (疋田 文五郎, 1537–1605), Kagetada by his nanori. Hikita was a Japanese swordsman during the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
of the 16th century. Hikita Bungoro was the nephew of the famous swordsman Kamiizumi Hidetsuna, in which they were both very well versed in the ways of bujutsu. Another famous swordsman by the name of Yagyū Muneyoshi (the father of Yagyū Munenori) had seen the superb skills set by Hidetsuna.[1] Following this Hōzōin In'ei, the head monk of the Hōzōin temple in Nara, arranged for a duel between Muneyoshi and Hidetsuna
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Shōgun
A shōgun (将軍, [ɕoːɡɯɴ] ( listen)) was the military dictator of Japan
Japan
during the period from 1185 to 1868 (with exceptions). In most of this period, the shōguns were the de facto rulers of the country, although nominally they were appointed by the Emperor as a ceremonial formality.[1] The shōguns held almost absolute power over territories through military means
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Kamiizumi Nobutsuna
Kamiizumi Ise-no-kami Fujiwara-no-Nobutsuna (上泉伊勢守藤原信綱 born c. 1508, date of death unknown) was a samurai in Japan's Sengoku period
Sengoku period
famous for creating the Shinkage-ryū
Shinkage-ryū
school of combat.Contents1 Early life 2 As a general 3 Spreading Shinkage-ryū 4 Later years and death 5 Impact 6 References 7 Further readingEarly life[edit] Kamiizumi was born as Kamiizumi Hidetsuna in his family castle in Kōzuke Province
Kōzuke Province
(modern day Maebashi, Gunma
Maebashi, Gunma
Prefecture). His family were minor landed lords in the service of the Yamanouchi branch of the Uesugi clan.[1] At the time of his birth, Kōzuke Province
Kōzuke Province
was being contested by the Uesugi, the Hōjō, and the Takeda clans
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Miyamoto Musashi
Miyamoto Musashi
Miyamoto Musashi
(宮本 武蔵, c. 1584 – June 13, 1645), also known as Shinmen Takezō, Miyamoto Bennosuke or, by his Buddhist
Buddhist
name, Niten Dōraku,[1] was a Japanese swordsman, philosopher, writer and rōnin. Musashi, as he was often simply known, became renowned through stories of his excellent and unique double-bladed swordsmanship and undefeated record in his 61 duels (next is 33 by Itō Ittōsai). He was the founder of the Niten-Ichi-Ryû-School or Niten-ryū style of swordsmanship and in his final years authored The Book of Five Rings (五輪の書, Go Rin No Sho), and Dokkōdō (The Path of Aloneness). Both documents were given to Terao Magonojō, the most important of Musashi's students, seven days before Musashi's death. Go Rin No Sho deals primarily with the character of his Niten-Ichi-Ryū-School in a concrete sense e.g
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