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Igbomina
Contemporary:Apala Fuji Were Yoruba Highlife Waka Jùjú Afrobeat SakaraFolk/Traditional:Ehin Ogbe Bolojo Obitun Biripo Bata Olele Ijala Gelede Ekun Iyawo/Rara Dadakuada Oriki Esa Alamo Gbedu Iremoje EwiNotable PersonalitiesList of Yoruba peopleReligionGod Olorun Olodumare OlofiDivination Ifá Opon Ifá Opele Odù IfáOrishas Obatala Osanyin Elegba Yemoja Olokun Shango Oya/Yansa Ogun Babalú-Ayé Oshun Oshosi Orunmila Aganju More....DiasporaOkus Bahians Saros Akus Sierra Leone Creoles Taboms, Agudas & Amaros Afro-Cubans / Lucumis United States Afro-Dominicans Afro-Haitians Canada Ivory Coast Britain IrelandFestivals & EventsWest Africa:Osun-Osogbo Olojo Igogo Eyo Festival Badagry Festival Odun Ogun Ojude Oba Oro Aké Arts & Book Festival World Sango Festival Odun Egungun Lisabi Odun Olokun Orosun Yoruba Drum FestivalDiaspora:Odunde Festival Yoruba Arts Festival
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List Of Yoruba People
This is a list of Yoruba people, who are famous, notable, distinguished or have excelled in various fields of human endeavour. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
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Were Music
Were music (Yoruba: Wéré) is an indigenous Yoruba music, which, like ajisari, is a way of using music to arouse the Islamic
Islamic
faithful to pray and feast during Ramadan
Ramadan
festival in Yorubaland. Ajiwere or oniwere means "one who performs were music." Unlike ajisari, were is performed in groups. Usually young men or boys, numbering up to ten or more, come together to write songs and practise dance moves. Again unlike ajisari, who sleep a bit and only come out at 2:00 in the morning, the "ajiwere" or "oniwere" leave their homes each night shortly after the Isha'a
Isha'a
(8:00 PM) and Tarawih prayers. They'll then roam the streets singing and dancing till about 4:00 AM when they disperse to go prepare for that day's fasting
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Olorun
Olorun (Yoruba: Ọlọrun or Ọlọhun), literally the ruler of (or in) the Heavens, is the name given to one of the three manifestations of the Supreme God
God
in the Yoruba pantheon. Olorun is the owner of the heavens and, in this manifestation, is associated with the Sun. The vital energy of Olorun manifests in humans as Ashé, which is the life force that runs through all living things.[1] In Yorubaland, Akamara is believed to be the Source of all Existence
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Yoruba Culture
Yoruba culture
Yoruba culture
refers to the cultural norms of Yorubaland
Yorubaland
and the Yoruba people.[1]Contents1 Art1.1 Sculpture 1.2 Textile 1.3 Cuisine2 Naming customs2.1 Naming 2.2 Oruko Amutorunwa (Preordained name) 2.3 Oruko Abiso (Name given at birth) 2.4 Abiku Names 2.5 Pet names3 Law 4 Linguistics 5 Wedding 6 Music 7 Funeral 8 Philosophy 9 Yoruba Idealism 10 Religion 11 Language 12 References 13 External references 14 Further readingArt[edit] Main article: Yoruba art Sculpture[edit]Yoruba Copper mask for King Obalufon, Ife, Nigeria
Nigeria
c. 1300 C.E.The Yoruba are said to be prolific sculptors, famous for their magnificent terra cotta works throughout the 12th and 14th century; artists also earnests their capacity in making artwork out of bronze.[2] Esiẹ Museum is a museum in Esiẹ, Irepodun
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Olukumi People
The Olukumi people
Olukumi people
are an ancient fragment of Yoruba people, located in Aniocha North local government area of Delta State, Nigeria. The Olukumis occupy eight communities west of the Niger river, and are together known today, as the Odiani clan in Aniomaland. Historically, the Odianis are the Yoruba clans in the Anioma cultural area.[1] Ugbodu town is considered the traditional headquarters of the Olukumi people and is traditionally headed by the Oloza of Ugbodu
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Sagamu
Ogun State
Ogun State
- 512,750  · Remo North: 70,470  · Ikenne: 140,490  · Shagamu: 301,790 Lagos State
Lagos State
- 619,520  · Ikorodu: 619,520ReligionChristianity · Islam · Yoruba religionSagamu OffinLGASagamuLocation i
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Savé
Savé
Savé
is a city in Benin, lying on the Cotonou- Parakou
Parakou
railway and the main north-south road. It is known for its local boulders, popular with climbers. "Savé" is the corrupted rendition of the historical Yoruba name Sabe The commune covers an area of 2228 square kilometres and as of 2002 had a population of 67,753 people.[2][3] Transport[edit] Savé
Savé
is served by a station of the Benin
Benin
Railways system. See also[edit] Railway
Railway
stations in BeninReferences[edit]^ "World Gazetteer". Archived from the original on January 11, 2013.  ^ "Save". Atlas Monographique des Communes du Benin. Retrieved January 5, 2010.  ^ "Communes of Benin". Statoids
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Apala
Apala (or Akpala) is a musical genre, originally derived from the Yoruba people
Yoruba people
of Nigeria.[1] It is a percussion-based style that developed in the late 1930s, when it was used to wake worshippers after fasting during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. The rhythms of apala grew more complex over time, influenced by Cuban music and eventually became quite popular in Kannada Instruments include a rattle (sekere), thumb piano (agidigbo) and a bell (agogô), as well as two or three talking drums. Haruna Ishola is undoubtedly the best-known performer of apala in Nigerian history. Others may hold a contrary view that Ayinla Omowura is better known, and the most successful musician of Apala. Both of them played an integral role in the popularization of the genre, and it is distinct from, older than, and much more difficult to master than fuji music
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Fuji Music
Fuji is a popular Nigerian musical genre. It arose from the improvisational Ajisari/were music tradition, which is a kind of music performed to wake Muslims before dawn during the Ramadan
Ramadan
fasting season. Were
Were
music/ Ajisari itself was made popular by Alhaji Sikiru Ayinde Barrister.Contents1 History1.1 Modernization 1.2 Continued growth2 Notes 3 External linksHistory[edit] Were
Were
music/Ajisari, traditionally, was an Islamic type music played by the Muslim children in Yorubaland
Yorubaland
to wake the faithful for fasting or Suhur
Suhur
during Ramadan
Ramadan
period. This musical genre was made popular by Alhaji Dauda Epo-Akara, the deceased who based in Ibadan,was the "awurebe" founder and Ganiyu Kuti, a.k.a
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Highlife
Highlife
Highlife
is a music genre that originated in Ghana
Ghana
early in the 20th century. It uses the melodic and main rhythmic structures of traditional Akan music, but is played with Western instruments.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Artists3.1 Ghana 3.2 Nigeria 3.3 Sierra Leone4 Highlife
Highlife
in jazz 5 References 6 Further readingDescription[edit] Highlife
Highlife
is characterised by jazzy horns and multiple guitars which lead the band. Recently it has acquired an uptempo, synth-driven sound.[1][2][3] The following arpeggiated highlife guitar part is modeled after an Afro-Cuban guajeo.[4] The pattern of attack-points is nearly identical to the 3-2 clave motif guajeo as shown below. The bell pattern known in Cuba
Cuba
as clave is indigenous to Ghana
Ghana
and Nigeria, and is used in highlife.[5]Top: clave
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Ketu (Benin)
Ketu is a historical region in what is now the Republic of Benin, in the area of the town of Kétou (Ketu). It is one of the oldest capitals of the Yoruba speaking people, tracing its establishment to a settlement founded by a descendant of Oduduwa, also known as Odudua, Oòdua and Eleduwa. The regents of the town were traditionally styled "Alaketu", and are related to the Egba sub-group of the Yoruba people in present-day Nigeria. Ketu is considered one of the sixteen original kingdoms established by the children of Oduduwa
Oduduwa
in Oyo mythic history, though this ancient pedigree has been somewhat neglected in contemporary Yoruba historical research, which tends to focus on communities within Nigeria. The exact status of Ketu within the Oyo empire however is contested
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Waka Music
Waka music is a popular Islamic-oriented Yoruba musical genre. It was made popular by Alhaja Batile Alake from Ijebu, who took the genre into the mainstream Nigerian music by playing it at concerts and parties; also, she was the first waka singer to record an album. Later, younger singers like Salawa Abeni and Kuburatu Alaragbo joined the pack. In 1992, Salawa Abeni was crowned "Queen of Waka" by the Alafin of Oyo, Oba Lamidi Adeyemi.[citation needed] Waka music has no connection whatsoever with the official song of the 2010 FIFA World Cup
2010 FIFA World Cup
called Waka Waka (This Time for Africa) which is a traditional African soldiers' song from Cameroon.This article about African music is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about a music genre is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis Nigeria-related article is a stub
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Afrobeat
Afrobeat
Afrobeat
is a music genre which developed in the 1970s when African musicians began combining elements of West African musical styles such as jùjú music and highlife with American funk and jazz influences, with a focus on chanted vocals, complex intersecting rhythms, and percussion.[1] The term was coined by Nigerian
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Sakara Music
Sakara music is a form of popular Nigerian music based in the traditions of Yoruba music. It is a Moslem-influenced style, mostly in the form of praise songs, that uses only traditional Yoruba instruments such as the solemn-sounding goje violin, and the small round sakara drum, which is similar to a tambourine and is beaten with a stick.[1] Sakara music overlays the nasalized, melismatic vocals of Islamic music on the traditional percussion instruments.[2] The music is often brooding and philosophical in mood.[3] One of the first performers of this type of music in Lagos
Lagos
was Abibu Oluwa, who started playing in the 1930s. On his death in 1964 his place in the band was taken by Salami Alabi (Lefty) Balogun (October 1913 - 29 December 1981), a talking drummer, who released over 35 records
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Batá Drum
A Batá drum
Batá drum
is a double-headed drum shaped like an hourglass with one end larger than the other. The percussion instrument is used primarily for the use of religious or semi-religious purposes for the native culture from the land of Yoruba, located in Nigeria, as well as by worshippers of Santería
Santería
in Cuba, Puerto Rico, and in the United States. The Batá drum's popular functions are entertainment and to convey messages. Its early function was as a drum of different gods, drum of royalty, drum of ancestors and drum of politicians
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