HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
[...More...]

Internet Assigned Numbers Authority
The Internet
Internet
Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) is a department of ICANN, a nonprofit private American corporation that oversees global IP address
IP address
allocation, autonomous system number allocation, root zone managem
[...More...]

picture info

Windows 8
Windows 8
Windows 8
is a personal computer operating system developed by Microsoft
Microsoft
as part of the Windows NT
Windows NT
family of operating systems. Development of Windows 8
Windows 8
started before the release of its predecessor, Windows 7, in 2009. It was announced at CES 2011, and followed by the release of three pre-release versions from September 2011 to May 2012
[...More...]

picture info

Language Localisation
Language localisation
Language localisation
(or localization, see spelling differences) is the process of adapting a product that has been previously translated into multiple languages to a specific country or region (from Latin locus (place) and the English term locale, "a place where something happens or is set").[1] It is the second phase of a larger process of product translation and cultural adaptation (for specific countries, regions or groups) to account for differences in distinct markets, a process known as internationalisation and localisation. Language localisation
Language localisation
differs from translation activity because it involves a comprehensive study of the target culture in order to correctly adapt the product to local needs
[...More...]

Martin Haspelmath
Martin Haspelmath (German: [ˈmarti:n ˈhaspl̩ma:t]; born 2 February 1963 in Hoya, Lower Saxony) is a German linguist working in the field of linguistic typology. He is a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (since 2015), and worked at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig
Leipzig
from 1998 to 2015. He is also an honorary professor of linguistics at the University of Leipzig. He is one of the editors of the World Atlas of Language Structures and the Glottolog
Glottolog
online database, and has worked on the Standard Average European sprachbund. Besides typology, his research interests include syntactic and morphological theory, language change and language contact. He is a member of the Academia Europaea
[...More...]

picture info

Dialect Continuum
A dialect continuum or dialect chain is a spread of language varieties spoken across some geographical area such that neighbouring varieties differ only slightly, but the differences accumulate over distance so that widely separated varieties are not mutually intelligible. That happens, for example, across large parts of India
India
(the Indo-Aryan languages) or the Arab world
Arab world
(Arabic). Historically, it also happened in various parts of Europe
Europe
such as between Portugal, southern Belgium (Wallonia) and southern Italy
Italy
(Western Romance languages) and between Flanders
Flanders
and Austria
Austria
(German dialects). Leonard Bloomfield used the name dialect area.[1] Charles F
[...More...]

picture info

Diglossia
In linguistics, diglossia (/daɪˈɡlɒsiə/) is a situation in which two dialects or languages are used by a single language community. In addition to the community's everyday or vernacular language variety (labeled "L" or "low" variety), a second, highly codified variety (labeled "H" or "high") is used in certain situations such as literature, formal education, or other specific settings, but not used for ordinary conversation.[1] In most cases, the H variety has no native speakers. The high variety may be an older stage of the same language (as in medieval Europe, where Latin remained in formal use even as colloquial speech diverged), an unrelated language, or a distinct yet closely related present day dialect (e.g. Standard German
Standard German
alongside Low German; or Chinese, with Mandarin as the official, literary standard and local varieties of Chinese used in everyday communication)
[...More...]

picture info

Metadata Object Description Schema
The Metadata Object Description Schema
Metadata Object Description Schema
(MODS) is an XML-based bibliographic description schema developed by the United States Library of Congress' Network Development and Standards Office. MODS was designed as a compromise between the complexity of the MARC format used by libraries and the extreme simplicity of Dublin Core metadata.Contents1 About MODS1.1 History and development 1.2 Relationship to MARC 1.3 Advantages 1.4 Maintenance board2 See also 3 References 4 External linksAbout MODS[edit] History and development[edit] The Library of Congress' Network Development and MARC Standards Office, with interested experts, developed the Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) in 2002 for a bibliographic element set that may be used for a variety of purposes, and particularly for library applications
[...More...]

picture info

Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
[...More...]

CLDR
The Common Locale Data Repository Project, often abbreviated as CLDR, is a project of the Unicode Consortium
Unicode Consortium
to provide locale data in the XML
XML
format for use in computer applications. CLDR contains locale specific information that an operating system will typically provide to applications. CLDR is written in LDML (Locale Data Markup Language)
[...More...]

picture info

Constructed Language
A constructed language (sometimes called a conlang) is a language whose phonology, grammar, and vocabulary have been consciously devised for human or human-like communication, instead of having developed naturally. It is also referred to as an artificial, planned or invented language[2] and in some cases a fictional language. There are many possible reasons to create a constructed language, such as: to ease human communication (see international auxiliary language and code), to give fiction or an associated constructed setting an added layer of realism, for experimentation in the fields of linguistics, cognitive science, and machine learning, for artistic creation, and for language games. The expression planned language is sometimes used to indicate international auxiliary languages and other languages designed for actual use in human communication. Some prefer it to the adjective artificial, as this term may be perceived as pejorative
[...More...]

MARC Standards
MARC (MAchine-Readable Cataloging) standards are a set of digital formats for the description of items catalogued by libraries, such as books. Working with the Library of Congress, American computer scientist Henriette Avram developed MARC in the 1960s to create records that could be read by computers and shared among libraries.[1] By 1971, MARC formats had become the US national standard for dissemination of bibliographic data. Two years later, they became the international standard. There are several versions of MARC in use around the world, the most predominant being MARC 21, created in 1999 as a result of the harmonization of U.S. and Canadian MARC formats, and UNIMARC, widely used in Europe
[...More...]

SSILA
The Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA) is an international organization founded in 1981 devoted to the study of the indigenous languages of North, Central, and South America. SSILA has an annual winter meeting held in association with the Linguistic Society of America's annual conference. Summer meetings are held in alternate years at venues near the LSA's Summer Institute. Presentations at SSILA meetings may be made in English, Spanish, or Portuguese. Each year, SSILA accepts nominations for three awards, which are presented at the annual meeting. The Mary R. Haas
Mary R. Haas
Book Award is presented for an outstanding unpublished manuscript that makes a significant substantive contribution to our knowledge of native American languages
[...More...]

picture info

IETF
The Internet
Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF) develops and promotes voluntary Internet
Internet
standards, in particular the standards that comprise the Internet
Internet
protocol suite (TCP/IP). It is an open standards organization, with no formal membership or membership requirements. All participants and managers are volunteers, though their work is usually funded by their employers or sponsors. The IETF started out as an activity supported by the U.S
[...More...]

picture info

EPUB
EPUB
EPUB
is an e-book file format that uses the ".epub" file extension. The term is short for electronic publication and is sometimes styled ePub. EPUB
EPUB
is supported by many e-readers, and compatible software is available for most smartphones, tablets, and computers. EPUB
EPUB
is a technical standard published by the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF)
[...More...]

picture info

Proto-Indo-European Language
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
[...More...]