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ISO 639-2
 ISO 639-2:1998, Codes for the representation of names of languages — Part 2: Alpha-3 code, is the second part of the ISO 639 standard, which lists codes for the representation of the names of languages. The three-letter codes given for each language in this part of the standard are referred to as "Alpha-3" codes. There are 464 entries in the list of ISO 639-2 codes. The US Library of Congress
Library of Congress
is the registration authority for ISO 639-2 (referred to as ISO 639-2/RA)
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Mon–Khmer Languages
The Austroasiatic languages,[note 1] in recent classifications synonymous with Mon–Khmer,[2] are a large language family of Mainland Southeast Asia, also scattered throughout India, Bangladesh, Nepal
Nepal
and the southern border of China, with around 117 million speakers.[3] The name Austroasiatic comes from the Latin
Latin
words for "South" and "Asia", hence "South Asia". Of these languages, only Vietnamese, Khmer, and Mon have a long-established recorded history, and only Vietnamese and Khmer have official status as modern national languages (in Vietnam
Vietnam
and Cambodia, respectively). In Myanmar, the Wa language is the de facto official language of Wa State. The rest of the languages are spoken by minority groups and have no official status. Ethnologue
Ethnologue
identifies 168 Austroasiatic languages
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Legacy Systems
In computing, a legacy system is an old method, technology, computer system, or application program, "of, relating to, or being a previous or outdated computer system."[1] Often a pejorative term, referencing a system as "legacy" means that it paved the way for the standards that would follow it. This can also imply that the system is out of date or in need of replacement.Contents1 Overview 2 Problems posed by legacy computing 3 Improvements on legacy software systems 4 NASA example 5 Additional uses of the term Legacy in computing 6 Brownfield architecture 7 Alternative view 8 See also 9 References 10 Further readingOverview[edit] The first use of the term legacy to describe computer systems probably occurred in the 1970s. By the 1980s it was commonly used to refer to existing computer systems to distinguish them from the design and implementation of new systems
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International Standard
International standards are standards developed by international standards organizations. International standards are available for consideration and use worldwide. The most prominent organization is the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).Contents1 Purpose 2 History2.1 Standardization 2.2 International organizations3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPurpose[edit] International standards may be used either by direct application or by a process of modifying an international standard to suit local conditions
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Shilluk Language
Shilluk (natively Dhøg Cøllø or d̪ɔ́cɔ̀llɔ̀)[3] is a Luo language spoken by the Shilluk people
Shilluk people
of South Sudan
South Sudan
and Sudan. It is closely related to other Luo and Nilotic peoples' languages. The term Shilluk is a pronunciation of Arabic
Arabic
origin.[4]Contents1 Phonology1.1 Vowels1.1.1 Advanced and retracted tongue root1.2 Consonants 1.3 Tone2 Morphology2.1 Syllable structure3 Orthography 4 Sample text 5 ReferencesPhonology[edit] Vowels[edit]Back Central FrontClose i [i] i̠ [i̠]u̠ [u̠]Mid e [ɛ] e [ɛ̠]o [o] ɔ [ɔ] ɔ̠ [ɔ̠]Opena [a] a̠ [a̠]Each of these vowels also exists in a long form and an overlong form which are phonemic.[5][6] Advanced and retracted tongue root[edit] Shilluk, like most Nilotic languages, differentiates vowels according to their place of articulation
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Creole Language
A creole language,[1][2][3] or simply creole, is a stable natural language developed from a mixture of different languages at a fairly sudden point in time: often, a pidgin transitioned into a full, native language. While the concept is similar to that of a mixed or hybrid language, in the strict sense of the term, a mixed/hybrid language has derived from two or more languages, to such an extent that it is no longer closely related to the source languages. Creoles also differ from pidgins in that, while a pidgin has a highly simplified linguistic structure that develops as a means of establishing communication between two or more disparate language groups, a creole language is more complex, used for day-to-day purposes in a community, and acquired by children as a native language
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Pidgin
A pidgin[1][2][3] /ˈpɪdʒɪn/, or pidgin language, is a grammatically simplified means of communication that develops between two or more groups that do not have a language in common: typically, a mixture of simplified languages or a simplified primary language with other languages' elements included. It is most commonly employed in situations such as trade, or where both groups speak languages different from the language of the country in which they reside (but where there is no common language between the groups). Fundamentally, a pidgin is a simplified means of linguistic communication, as it is constructed impromptu, or by convention, between individuals or groups of people. A pidgin is not the native language of any speech community, but is instead learned as a second language.[4][5] A pidgin may be built from words, sounds, or body language from a multitude of languages as well as onomatopoeia
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Australian Languages
The Australian
The Australian
Aboriginal languages consist of around 290–363[1] languages belonging to an estimated twenty-eight language families and isolates, spoken by Aboriginal Australians
Aboriginal Australians
of mainland Australia
Australia
and a few nearby islands.[2] The relationships between these languages are not clear at present
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Finno-Ugrian Languages
Finno-Ugric (/ˌfɪnoʊˈjuːɡrɪk/ or /ˌfɪnoʊˈuːɡrɪk/),[1] Finno-Ugrian or Fenno-Ugric is a traditional grouping of all languages in the Uralic language family except the Samoyedic languages
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Caucasian Languages
The Caucasian languages are a large and extremely varied array of languages spoken by more than ten million people in and around the Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, which lie between the Black Sea
Black Sea
and the Caspian Sea. Linguistic comparison allows these languages to be classified into several language families, with little or no discernible affinity to each other
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Central American Indian Languages
Mesoamerican languages
Mesoamerican languages
are the languages indigenous to the Mesoamerican cultural area, which covers southern Mexico, all of Guatemala
Guatemala
and Belize
Belize
and parts of Honduras
Honduras
and El Salvador
El Salvador
and Nicaragua. The area is characterized by extensive linguistic diversity containing several hundred different languages and seven major language families. Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
is also an area of high linguistic diffusion in that long-term interaction among speakers of different languages through several millennia has resulted in the convergence of certain linguistic traits across disparate language families
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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Languages
Language
Language
is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system. The scientific study of language is called linguistics. Questions concerning the philosophy of language, such as whether words can represent experience, have been debated at least since Gorgias
Gorgias
and Plato
Plato
in ancient Greece. Thinkers such as Rousseau
Rousseau
have argued that language originated from emotions while others like Kant have held that it originated from rational and logical thought. 20th-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein argued that philosophy is really the study of language. Major figures in linguistics include Ferdinand de Saussure and Noam Chomsky. Estimates of the number of human languages in the world vary between 5,000 and 7,000
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Korean Languages
The Koreanic languages are a language family consisting of the modern Korean language together with extinct ancient relatives closer to it than to any other proposed links. The Jeju language of Jeju Island, considered by some as a dialect of modern Korean, is distinct enough to be considered a language in its own right by other authorities. Some consider that rather than being a language isolate, Korean forms a small language family, together with Jeju.Contents1 External relationships 2 Classification2.1 Ancient Koreanic languages 2.2 Modern Koreanic languages3 Members 4 See also 5 ReferencesExternal relationships[edit] Among extant languages, Korean is considered by most linguists to be a language isolate and by some as part of the widely rejected Altaic family or the disputed Dravido-Korean languages.[2] Alexander Vovin (2015)[3] notes that Koreanic shares some typological features with the four Paleosiberian language groups (e.g
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Karen Languages
The Karen /kəˈrɛn/[2] or Karenic languages are tonal languages spoken by some seven million Karen people. They are of unclear affiliation within the Sino-Tibetan languages.[3] The Karen languages are written using the Burmese script.[4] The three main branches are Sgaw, Pwo, and Pa'o. Karenni (also known as Kayah or Red Karen) and Kayan (also known as Padaung) are related to the Sgaw branch
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