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IPS Panel
IPS (in-plane switching) is a screen technology for liquid-crystal displays (LCDs). It was designed to solve the main limitations of the twisted nematic field effect (TN) matrix LCDs which were prevalent in the late 1980s. These limitations included strong viewing angle dependence and low-quality color reproduction. In-plane switching involves arranging and switching the orientation of the molecules of the liquid crystal (LC) layer between the glass substrates. This is done, essentially, parallel to these glass plates.[1]Contents1 History 2 Technology2.1 Implementation 2.2 Advantages 2.3 Disadvantages3 IPS Alternative Technologies3.1 Plane to Line Switching (PLS) 3.2 Advanced Hyper-Viewing Angle (AHVA)4 Manufacturers 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The TN method was the only viable technology for active matrix TFT LCDs in the late 1980s and early 1990s
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Gyricon
Gyricon is a type of electronic paper developed at the Xerox PARC (Palo Alto Research Center). It has many of the same properties as paper: it is flexible, contains an image, and is viewable from a wide angle, but it can be erased and written thousands of times. A Gyricon sheet is a thin layer of transparent plastic, in which millions of small beads, somewhat like toner particles, are randomly dispersed. The beads, each contained in an oil-filled cavity, are free to rotate within those cavities. The beads are "bichromal", with hemispheres of two contrasting colors (e.g. black and white, red and white), and charged, so they exhibit an electrical dipole. When voltage is applied to the surface of the sheet, the beads rotate to present one colored side to the viewer. Voltages can be applied to the surface to create images such as text and pictures
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High-definition Video
High-definition video
High-definition video
is video of higher resolution and quality than standard-definition. While there is no standardized meaning for high-definition, generally any video image with considerably more than 480 vertical lines (North America) or 576 vertical lines (Europe) is considered high-definition. 480 scan lines is generally the minimum even though the majority of systems greatly exceed that. Images of standard resolution captured at rates faster than normal (60 frames/second North America, 50 fps Europe), by a high-speed camera may be considered high-definition in some contexts
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Backlight
A backlight is a form of illumination used in liquid crystal displays (LCDs). As LCDs do not produce light by themselves (unlike, for example cathode ray tube (CRT) displays), they need illumination (ambient light or a special light source) to produce a visible image. Backlights illuminate the LCD from the side or back of the display panel, unlike frontlights, which are placed in front of the LCD. Backlights are used in small displays to increase readability in low light conditions such as in wristwatches,[1] and are used in smart phones, computer displays and LCD televisions to produce light in a manner similar to a CRT display. A review of some early backlighting schemes for LCDs is given in a report Engineering and Technology History by Peter J. Wild.[2] Simple types of LCDs such as in pocket calculators are built without an internal light source, requiring external light sources to convey the display image to the user
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Polarizing Filter
A polarizer or polariser is an optical filter that lets light waves of a specific polarization pass through while blocking light waves of other polarizations.[1][2][3][4] It can convert a beam of light of undefined or mixed polarization into a beam of well-defined polarization, that is polarized light. The common types of polarizers are linear polarizers and circular polarizers. Polarizers are used in many optical techniques and instruments, and polarizing filters find applications in photography and LCD technology
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Micrometer
A micrometer (/maɪˈkrɒmɪtər/ my-KROM-i-tər), sometimes known as a micrometer screw gauge, is a device incorporating a calibrated screw widely used for precise measurement of components[1] in mechanical engineering and machining as well as most mechanical trades, along with other metrological instruments such as dial, vernier, and digital calipers[2]. Micrometers are usually, but not always, in the form of calipers (opposing ends joined by a frame). The spindle is a very accurately machined screw and the object to be measured is placed between the spindle and the anvil. The spindle is moved by turning the ratchet knob or thimble until the object to be measured is lightly touched by both the spindle and the anvil. Micrometers are also used in telescopes or microscopes to measure the apparent diameter of celestial bodies or microscopic objects. The micrometer used with a telescope was invented about 1638 by William Gascoigne, an English astronomer
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Anisotropy
Anisotropy
Anisotropy
/ˌænɪˈsɒtrəpi/, /ˌænaɪˈsɒtrəpi/ is the property of being directionally dependent, which implies different properties in different directions, as opposed to isotropy. It can be defined as a difference, when measured along different axes, in a material's physical or mechanical properties (absorbance, refractive index, conductivity, tensile strength, etc.) An example of anisotropy is light coming through a polarizer
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Chevron (insignia)
Heraldry
Heraldry
portalv t eA chevron (also spelled cheveron, especially in older documents) is a V-shaped mark, often inverted. The word is usually used in reference to a kind of fret in architecture, or to a badge or insignia used in military or police uniforms to indicate rank or length of service, or in heraldry and the designs of flags (see flag terminology).Contents1 Ancient history 2 Heraldry 3 Rank insignia3.1 Examples4 Other uses as insignia 5 References 6 External linksAncient history[edit] The chevron occurs in early art including designs on pottery and rock carvings
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Samsung Electronics
Samsung
Samsung
Electronics
Electronics
Co., Ltd. (Korean: 삼성전자; Hanja: 三星電子 (Literally "tristar electronics")) is a South Korean multinational electronics company headquartered in Suwon, South Korea.[1] Through extremely complicated ownership structure with some circular ownership,[3] it is the flagship company of the Samsung Group, accounting for 70% of the group's revenue in 2012.[4] Samsung Electronics
Electronics
has assembly plants and sales networks in 80 countries and employs around 308,745 people.[2] It is the world's largest information technology company by revenue
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Mobile Device
A mobile device (or handheld computer) is a computing device small enough to hold and operate in the hand. Typically, any handheld computer device will have an LCD
LCD
flatscreen interface, providing a touchscreen interface with digital buttons and keyboard or physical buttons along with a physical keyboard. Many such devices can connect to the Internet
Internet
and interconnect with other devices such as car entertainment systems or headsets via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, cellular networks or near field communication (NFC). Integrated cameras, digital media players, the ability to place and receive telephone calls, video games, and Global Positioning System
Global Positioning System
(GPS) capabilities are common. Power is typically provided by a lithium battery
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Tablet Computer
A tablet computer, commonly shortened to tablet, is a portable personal computer, typically with a mobile operating system and LCD touchscreen display processing circuitry, and a rechargeable battery in a single thin, flat package. Tablets, being computers, do what other personal computers do, but lack some I/O
I/O
capabilities that others have. Modern tablets largely resemble modern smartphones, the only differences being that tablets are relatively larger than smartphones, with screens 7 inches (18 cm) or larger, measured diagonally,[1][2][3][4] and may not support access to a cellular network. The touchscreen display is operated by gestures executed by finger or stylus instead of the mouse, trackpad, and keyboard of larger computers. Portable computers can be classified according to the presence and appearance of physical keyboards
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LG Display
LG Display
LG Display
(Korean: LG 디스플레이) is the world's largest LCD panel maker.[1] LG Display
LG Display
is one of the world's largest manufacturer and supplier of thin-film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) panels, OLEDs and flexible displays
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S-LCD
S- LCD
LCD
Corporation (Hangul: 에스 엘시디, Japanese: エス・エルシーディー) is a South Korean manufacturer of amorphous TFT LCD
TFT LCD
panels, owned by Samsung
Samsung
Electronics. The company was established in April 2004 in Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea as a joint venture between Samsung Electronics
Samsung Electronics
Co. Ltd (51% share) and Sony
Sony
Corporation (49% share). S-LCD, as of April 25, 2008, operated with a monthly production capacity of 100,000 seventh-generation amorphous silicon (a-Si) panels and 50,000 eighth-generation panels based on PVA technology,[1] which are integrated into both Samsung Electronics
Samsung Electronics
and Sony
Sony
LCD
LCD
televisions. S- LCD
LCD
originally had production facilities in both Japan and South Korea
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AU Optronics
AU Optronics
AU Optronics
(AUO) is a Taiwanese electronics manufacturer. It was formed in September 2001 by the merger of Acer Display Technology, Inc. (the former of AUO, established in 1996) and Unipac Optoelectronics Corporation. In October 2006, AUO acquired Quanta Display Inc. AUO has thus been operating production lines of various generations, capable of offering TFT-LCD panels from 1.4 to 85 inches in sizes. AUO was listed in Taiwan
Taiwan
Stock Exchange (TSE) in 2000 and was also the first pure TFT-LCD manufacturer to have been listed at the New York Stock Exchange
New York Stock Exchange
(NYSE) in 2002
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Acer Inc.
Acer Inc.
Acer Inc.
(/ˈeɪsər/ AY-sər; Chinese: 宏碁股份有限公司; pinyin: Hóngqí Gǔfèn Yǒuxiàn Gōngsī, lit. Hongqi Corporation Ltd.) is a Taiwanese multinational hardware and electronics corporation specializing in advanced electronics technology and is headquartered in Xizhi, New Taipei
New Taipei
City, Taiwan. Acer's products include desktop PCs, laptop PCs (Which can be further subdivided into clamshell, 2-in-1, convertible and Chromebook), tablets, servers, storage devices, Virtual Reality devices, displays, smartphones and peripherals. Acer also sells gaming PCs and accessories under its Predator sub brand
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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