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Hydroelectric Plant
Hydroelectricity
Hydroelectricity
is electricity produced from hydropower. In 2015 hydropower generated 16.6% of the world's total electricity and 70% of all renewable electricity,[1] and was expected to increase about 3.1% each year for the next 25 years. Hydropower
Hydropower
is produced in 150 countries, with the Asia-Pacific
Asia-Pacific
region generating 33 percent of global hydropower in 2013. China
China
is the largest hydroelectricity producer, with 920 TWh
TWh
of production in 2013, representing 16.9 percent of domestic electricity use. The cost of hydroelectricity is relatively low, making it a competitive source of renewable electricity. The hydro station consumes no water, unlike coal or gas plants. The average cost of electricity from a hydro station larger than 10 megawatts is 3 to 5 U.S
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Three Gorges Dam
The Three Gorges
Three Gorges
Dam is a hydroelectric gravity dam that spans the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
by the town of Sandouping, located in Yiling District, Yichang, Hubei
Hubei
province, China. The Three Gorges
Three Gorges
Dam is the world's largest power station in terms of installed capacity (22,500 MW). In 2014 the dam generated 98.8 terawatt-hours (TWh) and had the world record, but was surpassed by Itaipú Dam
Itaipú Dam
that set the new world record in 2016 producing 103.1 TWh.[4] Except for the locks, the dam project was completed and fully functional as of July 4, 2012,[5][6] when the last of the main water turbines in the underground plant began production. The ship lift was complete in December 2015.[7] Each main water turbine has a capacity of 700 MW.[8][9] The dam body was completed in 2006
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Northumberland
Northumberland
Northumberland
(/nɔːrˈθʌmbərlənd/;[2] abbreviated Northd) is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria
Cumbria
to the west, County Durham
County Durham
and Tyne and Wear
Tyne and Wear
to the south and the Scottish Borders
Scottish Borders
to the north
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Megawatt
The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power. In the International System of Units (SI) it is defined as a derived unit of 1 joule per second,[1] and is used to quantify the rate of energy transfer
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Penny (United States Coin)
The United States one-cent coin, often called a penny, is a unit of currency equaling one-hundredth of a United States dollar. The cent's symbol is ¢. Its obverse has featured the profile of President Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
since 1909, the centennial of his birth. From 1959 (the sesquicentennial of Lincoln's birth) to 2008, the reverse featured the Lincoln Memorial. Four different reverse designs in 2009 honored Lincoln's 200th birthday and a new, "permanent" reverse – the Union Shield – was introduced in 2010. The coin is 0.75 inches (19.05 mm) in diameter and 0.0598 inches (1.52 mm) in thickness. Its weight has varied, depending upon the composition of metals used in its production (see further below). The U.S
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Kilowatt-hour
The kilowatt hour (symbol kWh, kW⋅h or kW h) is a unit of energy equal to 3.6 megajoules. If the energy is being transmitted or used at a constant rate (power) over a period of time, the total energy in kilowatt hours is equal to the power in kilowatts multiplied by the time in hours. The kilowatt hour is commonly used as a billing unit for energy delivered to consumers by electric utilities.Contents1 Definition 2 Examples 3 Symbol and abbreviations for kilowatt hour 4 Conversions 5 Watt
Watt
hour multiples and billing units 6 Confusion of kilowatt hours (energy) and kilowatts (power) 7 Misuse of watts per hour 8 Other energy-related units 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksDefinition[edit] The kilowatt hour (symbolized kW⋅h as per SI) is a composite unit of energy equivalent to one kilowatt (1 kW) of power sustained for one hour. One watt is equal to 1 J/s
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Greenhouse Gas
A greenhouse gas is a gas in an atmosphere that absorbs and emits radiant energy within the thermal infrared range. This process is the fundamental cause of the greenhouse effect.[1] The primary greenhouse gases in Earth's atmosphere are water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone
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Fossil Fuel
A fossil fuel is a fuel formed by natural processes, such as anaerobic decomposition of buried dead organisms, containing energy originating in ancient photosynthesis.[1] The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes exceeds 650 million years.[2] Fossil
Fossil
fuels contain high percentages of carbon and include petroleum, coal, and natural gas.[3] Other commonly used derivatives include kerosene and propane. Fossil
Fossil
fuels range from volatile materials with low carbon to hydrogen ratios like methane, to liquids like petroleum, to nonvolatile materials composed of almost pure carbon, like anthracite coal
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Serbia
Coordinates: 44°N 21°E / 44°N 21°E / 44; 21Republic of Serbia Република Србија (Serbian) Republika Srbija  (Serbian)FlagCoat of armsAnthem:  "Боже правде / Bože pravde" "God of Justice"Location of Serbia
Serbia
(green) and the disputed territory of Kosovo
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Bernard Forest De Bélidor
Bernard Forest de Bélidor
Bernard Forest de Bélidor
(1698, Catalonia, Spain
Spain
– 8 September 1761, Paris, France) was a French engineer, significant to the development of the science of hydraulics and ballistics.[1]Portrait of B. Forest de Belidor (1698-1761) (Louis-Gabriel Blanchet, 1752)He was the son of Jean Baptiste Foret de Belidor, an officer of dragoons, and his wife, Marie Héber but was orphaned at five months old and brought up by the family of his godfather, an artillery officer named de Fossiébourg. Bélidor enlisted in the army at a young age. After leaving the army, he developed an interest in science and engineering, and became professor of artillery at the school of Fère-en-Tardenois
Fère-en-Tardenois
in Aisne
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Electrical Generator
In electricity generation, a generator[1] is a device that converts motive power (mechanical energy) into electrical power for use in an external circuit. Sources of mechanical energy include steam turbines, gas turbines, water turbines, internal combustion engines and even hand cranks. The first electromagnetic generator, the Faraday disk, was built in 1831 by British scientist Michael Faraday. Generators provide nearly all of the power for electric power grids. The reverse conversion of electrical energy into mechanical energy is done by an electric motor, and motors and generators have many similarities
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Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840. This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, the increasing use of steam power, the development of machine tools and the rise of the factory system. Textiles were the dominant industry of the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
in terms of employment, value of output and capital invested
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Cragside
Cragside
Cragside
is a Victorian country house near the town of Rothbury
Rothbury
in Northumberland, England. It was the home of William Armstrong, 1st Baron Armstrong, founder of the Armstrong Whitworth
Armstrong Whitworth
armaments firm. An industrial magnate, scientist, philanthropist and inventor of the hydraulic crane and the Armstrong gun, Armstrong also displayed his inventiveness in the domestic sphere, making Cragside
Cragside
the first house in the world to be lit using hydroelectric power. The entire estate was technologically advanced; the architect of the house, Richard Norman Shaw, wrote that it was equipped with "wonderful hydraulic machines that do all sorts of things".[2] In the grounds, Armstrong built dams and created lakes to power a sawmill, a water-powered laundry, early versions of a dishwasher and a dumb waiter, a hydraulic lift and a hydroelectric rotisserie
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William Armstrong, 1st Baron Armstrong
William George Armstrong, 1st Baron Armstrong
Baron Armstrong
CB FRS (26 November 1810 – 27 December 1900) was an English industrialist who founded the Armstrong Whitworth
Armstrong Whitworth
manufacturing concern on Tyneside. He was also an eminent scientist, inventor and philanthropist. In collaboration with the architect Richard Norman Shaw, he built Cragside
Cragside
in Northumberland, the first house in the world to be lit by hydroelectricity. He is regarded as the inventor of modern artillery. Armstrong was knighted in 1859 after giving his gun patents to the government
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Asia-Pacific
Asia- Pacific
Pacific
or Asia
Asia
Pacific
Pacific
(abbreviated as APAC, Asia-Pac, AsPac, APJ, JAPA or JAPAC) is the part of the world in or near the Western Pacific
Pacific
Ocean. The region varies in size depending on which context, but it typically includes much of East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Oceania. The term may also include Russia
Russia
(on the North Pacific) and countries in the Americas
Americas
which are on the coast of the Eastern Pacific
Pacific
Ocean; the Asia- Pacific
Pacific
Economic Cooperation, for example, includes Canada, Chile, Russia, Mexico, Peru, and the United States
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Arc Lamp
An arc lamp or arc light is a lamp that produces light by an electric arc (also called a voltaic arc). The carbon arc light, which consists of an arc between carbon electrodes in air, invented by Humphry Davy in the first decade of the 1800s, was the first practical electric light.[1] It was widely used starting in the 1870s for street and large building lighting until it was superseded by the incandescent light in the early 20th century.[1] It continued in use in more specialized applications where a high intensity point light source was needed, such as searchlights and movie projectors until after World War II
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