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Huo Yuanjia
Huo Yuanjia
Huo Yuanjia
(18 January 1868 – 9 August 1910),[1] courtesy name Junqing, was a Chinese martial artist and a co-founder of the Chin Woo Athletic Association, a martial arts school in Shanghai. A practitioner of the martial art mizongyi,[2] Huo is considered a hero in China
China
for defeating foreign fighters in highly publicised matches at a time when Chinese sovereignty was being eroded by foreign imperialism, concessions and spheres of influence. Due to his heroic status, the legends and myths surrounding events in his life are difficult to discern from facts.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 Rise to fame 3 Chin Woo Athletic Association 4 Death 5 Legacy and expansion of Chin Woo 6 In popular culture 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Fa Jin
Fa jin, fajin, 'fajing, or fa chin (fā jìn, 發勁) is a term used in some Chinese martial arts, particularly the neijia (internal) martial arts, such as Xingyiquan, T'ai chi ch'uan
T'ai chi ch'uan
(Taijiquan), Baguazhang, Bak Mei
Bak Mei
and Bajiquan. It means to issue or discharge power explosively or refining the explosive power, and is not specific to any particular striking method. With this definition in mind, a boxer is also capable of the same
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Cantonese
Cantonese, or Standard Cantonese, is a variety of the Chinese language spoken within Guangzhou
Guangzhou
(historically known as Canton) and its vicinity in southeastern China. It is the traditional prestige variety of Yue, one of the major subdivisions of Chinese. In mainland China, it is the lingua franca of the province of Guangdong, being the majority language of the Pearl River Delta, and neighbouring areas such as Guangxi. It is the dominant and official language of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau
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Yim Wing-chun
Yim Wing Chun
Wing Chun
(simplified Chinese: 严咏春; traditional Chinese: 嚴詠春; Cantonese Yale: Yim4 Wing6Cheun1; pinyin: Yán Yǒngchūn) is a Chinese legendary character, often cited in Wing Chun
Wing Chun
legends as the first master of the martial art bearing her name. Wing Chun, though a person's name in Chinese language, translates literally to "spring chant", or may be substituted with the character for "eternal spring".[1] Different accounts of Yim Wing Chun's story exist, but the central sequence of events remains largely the same, beginning with the origin of her teacher
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Mount Hua
Mount Hua
Mount Hua
(simplified Chinese: 华山; traditional Chinese: 華山; pinyin: Huà shān[1]) is a mountain located near the city of Huayin in Shaanxi
Shaanxi
province, about 120 kilometres (75 mi) east of Xi'an. It is the western mountain of the Five Great Mountains of China, and has a long history of religious significance. Originally classified as having three peaks, in modern times the mountain is classified as five main peaks, of which the highest is the South Peak at 2,154.9 metres (7,070 ft).Contents1 Geography1.1 Summits2 History 3 Temples 4 Ascent routes 5 Hiking danger 6 See also 7 References7.1 Citations 7.2 Sources8 External linksGeography[edit] Mount Hua
Mount Hua
is situated in Huayin
Huayin
City, which is 120 kilometres (about 75 miles) from Xi'an
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Kunlun Mountains
The Kunlun Mountains
Kunlun Mountains
(simplified Chinese: 昆仑山; traditional Chinese: 崑崙山; pinyin: Kūnlún Shān, pronounced [kʰu̯ə́nlu̯ə̌n ʂán]; Mongolian: Хөндлөн Уулс, Khöndlön Uuls) are one of the longest mountain chains in Asia, extending more than 3,000 kilometres (1,900 mi). In the broadest sense, it forms the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau
Tibetan Plateau
south of the Tarim Basin. The exact definition of this range varies. An old source[1] uses Kunlun to mean the mountain belt that runs across the center of China, that is, Kunlun in the narrow sense: Altyn Tagh
Altyn Tagh
along with the Qilian and Qin Mountains. A recent source[2] has the Kunlun range forming most of the south side of the Tarim Basin
Tarim Basin
and then continuing east south of the Altyn Tagh
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Yin And Yang
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China
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Li Ching-Yuen
Li Ching-Yuen
Li Ching-Yuen
or Li Ching-Yun (simplified Chinese: 李清云; traditional Chinese: 李清雲; pinyin: Lǐ Qīngyún) (died 6 May 1933) was a Chinese herbalist, martial artist and tactical advisor, known for his supposed extreme longevity.[4][5] He claimed to have been born in 1736, while disputed records suggest 1677. Both claimed lifespans, of 197 and 256 years, far exceed the longest confirmed lifespan of 122 years and 164 days of French woman Jeanne Calment
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Qi
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China
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Yue Fei
Yue Fei
Yue Fei
(24 March 1103 – 27 January 1142), courtesy name Pengju, was a Han Chinese
Han Chinese
military general who lived during the Southern Song dynasty. His ancestral home was in Xiaoti, Yonghe Village, Tangyin, Xiangzhou, Henan
Henan
(in present-day Tangyin County, Anyang, Henan). He is best known for leading Southern Song forces in the wars in the 12th century between Southern Song and the Jurchen-ruled Jin dynasty in northern China
China
before being put to death by the Southern Song government in 1142.[2] He was granted the posthumous name Wumu (武穆) by Emperor Xiaozong in 1169, and later granted the posthumous title King of È (鄂王) by Emperor Ningzong in 1211
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Neigong
Neigong, also spelled nei kung, neigung, or nae gong, refers to any of a set of Chinese breathing, meditation and spiritual practice disciplines associated with Daoism
Daoism
and especially the Chinese martial arts. Neigong
Neigong
practice is normally associated with the so-called "soft style", "internal" or neijia 內家 Chinese martial arts, as opposed to the category known as waigong 外功 or "external skill" which is historically associated with shaolinquan or the so-called "hard style", "external" or wàijiā 外家 Chinese martial arts. Both have many different schools, disciplines and practices and historically there has been mutual influence between the two and distinguishing precisely between them differs from school to school. There is both martial and non-martial neigong
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Waijia
The Chinese martial arts
Chinese martial arts
Taijiquan
Taijiquan
being practiced on the Bund in Shanghai.There are hundreds of different styles of Chinese martial arts, each with their own sets of techniques and ideas. The concept of martial arts styles appeared from around the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
(1368-1644). Before the Ming period, martial skills were commonly differentiated mainly by their lineage.[1] There are common themes among these styles which allow them to be grouped according to generalized "families" (Chinese: 家; pinyin: jiā), "sects" (Chinese: 派; pinyin: pài), "class" (traditional Chinese: 門; simplified Chinese: 门; pinyin: mén), or "schools" (Chinese: 教; pinyin: jiào) of martial art styles
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Sifu
Shifu (simplified Chinese: 师傅 or 师父; traditional Chinese: 師傅 or 師父), or sifu in Cantonese, (sư phụ in Vietnamese) is a title for and role of a skillful person or a master. The character 師/师 means "skilled person" or "teacher", while the meaning of 傅 is "tutor" and the meaning of 父 is "father." 傅 and 父 are both pronounced "fu" with the same tones in Cantonese
Cantonese
and Mandarin. A similar term often used in Chinese is 老師/老师 ( Cantonese
Cantonese
Chinese pronunciation: lou5 si1; Mandarin Chinese pronunciation: lǎoshī), meaning "teacher" or literally "old person of skill". Though pronounced identically and bearing similar meanings, the two terms are distinct and usage is different
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Styles Of Chinese Martial Arts
The Chinese martial arts
Chinese martial arts
Taijiquan
Taijiquan
being practiced on the Bund in Shanghai.There are hundreds of different styles of Chinese martial arts, each with their own sets of techniques and ideas. The concept of martial arts styles appeared from around the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
(1368-1644). Before the Ming period, martial skills were commonly differentiated mainly by their lineage.[1] There are common themes among these styles which allow them to be grouped according to generalized "families" (Chinese: 家; pinyin: jiā), "sects" (Chinese: 派; pinyin: pài), "class" (traditional Chinese: 門; simplified Chinese: 门; pinyin: mén), or "schools" (Chinese: 教; pinyin: jiào) of martial art styles
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Bodhidharma
Zen
Zen
in JapanDōgen Hakuin EkakuSeon in KoreaTaego Bou Jinul Daewon Seongcheol Zen
Zen
in the USAD. T
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Jyutping
Jyutping
Jyutping
(Chinese: 粵拼; Jyutping: Jyut6ping3; Cantonese pronunciation: [jỳːt̚.pʰēŋ]) is a romanisation system for Cantonese
Cantonese
developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK), an academic group, in 1993. Its formal name is The Linguistic Society of Hong Kong Cantonese
Cantonese
Romanisation
Romanisation
Scheme
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