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Hujjat Al-Islam
Mullā Muḥammad-ʿAlī al-Zanjānī (Arabic: ملا محمد علي الزنجاني‎), surnamed Ḥujjat (1812 - 1851), was an early leader of the Bábí
Bábí
movement of 19th-century Persia. He is regarded by Bahá'ís as part of their own religious history, and is highly featured in the two primary Bahá'í historical books of God Passes By and The Dawn-breakers.Contents1 Background 2 Conversion 3 See also 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] Mullá Muḥammad-‘Aliy-i-Zanjání was the son of Ákhúnd Mullá `Abdu'r-Raḥím, a respected early nineteenth century mulla from Zanjan. As a boy, Muḥammad-‘Alí showed promise, such that his father sent him to the shiite shrine-cities of Najaf and Karbala in Iraq, where he studied under the prominent Sharífu'l-'Ulamá Mázandarání. With the death of his teacher and the closing of the seminaries during the epidemic of 1831, he returned to Iran, settling in Hamadan
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Shia
Sunni
Sunni
theological traditionsIlm al-KalamAsh'ari1 Maturidi Sunni
Sunni
Murji'ah Traditionalist2Shi'a Twelver3PrinciplesTawhid Adalah Prophecy Imamah QiyamahPracticesSalah Sawm Zakat Hajj Khums Jihad Commandin
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Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Bábí
Bábism[1] (Persian: بابیه‎, Babiyye), also known as the Bayání Faith[2][3] (Arabic: بيانة, Bayání), is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion which professes that there is one incorporeal, unknown, and incomprehensible God[4][5] who manifests his will in an unending series of theophanies, called Manifestations of God
Manifestations of God
(Arabic: ظهور الله)
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Persian Empire
The Persian Empire
Empire
(Persian: شاهنشاهی ایران‎, translit. Šâhanšâhiye Irân, lit. 'Imperial Iran') is a series of imperial dynasties centered in Persia/ Iran
Iran
since the 6th century BC in the Achaemenid
Achaemenid
era, to the 20th century AD in the Qajar
Qajar
era.Contents1 Achaemenids 2 Parthians and Sasanians 3 Safavids 4 List of the dynasties described as a Persian Empire 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksAchaemenids The first dynasty of the Persian Empire
Empire
was created by Achaemenids, established by Cyrus the Great
Cyrus the Great
in 550 BC with the conquest of Median, Lydian and Babylonian empires.[1] It covered much of the Ancient world and controlled the largest percentage of the earth's population in history when it was conquered by Alexander the Great
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Bahá'í Faith
The Bahá'í Faith
Faith
(/bəˈhɑːiː, -ˈhaɪ/; Persian: بهائی‎ Bahā'i) is a religion teaching the essential worth of all religions, and the unity and equality of all people.[1] Established by Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
in 1863, it initially grew in Iran
Iran
(Persia) and parts of the Middle East, where it has faced ongoing persecution since its inception.[2] Currently it has between 5 and 7 million adherents, known as Bahá'ís, spread out into most of the world's countries and territories.[3][note 1] It grew from the mid-19th-century Bábí religion, whose founder taught that God
God
would soon send a prophet in the manner of Jesus
Jesus
or Muhammad.[4] In 1863, after being banished from his native Iran, Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
announced that he was this prophet
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God Passes By
God Passes By, written by Shoghi Effendi, head of the Bahá'í Faith in the first half of the 20th century, is a book which provides a historical summary of the first century of the Bahá'í Faith, from 1844 to 1944.[1] While historical episodes are recounted in some detail, "God Passes By" is particularly notable for the significance Shoghi Effendi
Shoghi Effendi
assigns to events in the history of the Bahá'í Faith, and the interpretation he gives to various episodes.Contents1 Contents1.1 The Ministry of the
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The Dawn-breakers (book)
The Dawn-Breakers: Nabíl’s Narrative of the Early Days of the Bahá’í Revelation or Nabíl's Narrative (Táríkh-i-Nabíl) is a historical account of the early Bábí and Bahá'í Faiths penned by Nabíl-i-A`zam in 1887–8. The English translation by Shoghi Effendi was published in 1932.[1] The book relies mainly on the memoirs of surviving early Bábís and Nabíl himself was a participant in many of the scenes which he recounts. In 1887 Nabíl began writing The Dawn-Breakers with the personal assistance of Mírzá Músá, the brother of Bahá'u'lláh. It was finished in about a year and a half, and parts of the manuscript were reviewed and approved, some by Bahá'u'lláh, and others by `Abdu'l-Bahá.[citation needed] Many of the photographs of the Bahá'í historical sites in Iran
Iran
that illustrate the book were made by Effie Baker
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Hamadan
Hamadān[2] (pronounced [hæmædɒːn]) or Hamedān (Persian: همدان‎, Hamedān) (Old Persian: Haŋgmetana, Ecbatana) is the capital city of Hamadan Province
Hamadan Province
of Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 473,149, in 127,812 families.[3] Hamedan is believed to be among the oldest Iranian cities. It is possible that it was occupied by the Assyrians in 1100 BCE; the Ancient Greek historian, Herodotus, states that it was the capital of the Medes, around 700 BCE. Hamedan has a green mountainous area in the foothills of the 3,574-meter Alvand
Alvand
Mountain, in the midwest part of Iran
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Hujjah
Itmām al-hujjah (Arabic: اتمام الحجة‎ "completion of proof", from itmāmu "completion, realization" and ḥuǧǧatu "pretext, proof") is an Islamic concept denoting that religious truth has been completely clarified by a Messenger of Allah and made available to a people, who are considered to have no excuse to deny it.Contents1 Role of a Messenger 2 Punishment of adversaries2.1 Punishment through natural disaster 2.2 Punishment through human hands3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksRole of a Messenger[edit] The concept of Itmām al-hujjah requires that religious truth is presented by a Rasul (Messenger) and not by a mere Nabi (Prophet)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Hujjat
Mullā Muḥammad-ʿAlī al-Zanjānī (Arabic: ملا محمد علي الزنجاني‎), surnamed Ḥujjat (1812 - 1851), was an early leader of the Bábí movement of 19th-century Persia. He is regarded by Bahá'ís as part of their own religious history, and is highly featured in the two primary Bahá'í historical books of God Passes By and The Dawn-breakers.Contents1 Background 2 Conversion 3 See also 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] Mullá Muḥammad-‘Aliy-i-Zanjání was the son of Ákhúnd Mullá `Abdu'r-Raḥím, a respected early nineteenth century mulla from Zanjan. As a boy, Muḥammad-‘Alí showed promise, such that his father sent him to the shiite shrine-cities of Najaf and Karbala in Iraq, where he studied under the prominent Sharífu'l-'Ulamá Mázandarání. With the death of his teacher and the closing of the seminaries during the epidemic of 1831, he returned to Iran, settling in Hamadan
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Hujja
A term used in Shi'i
Shi'i
terminology, "hujja" means "proof [implied: proof of God]." It is usually used to refer to a single individual in any given human era who represents God's "proof" to humanity.[1] The hujja is a prophet or an Imam
Imam
who possess a relationship with God
God
that is greater than anyone else. The Imam
Imam
who is the hujja of his time functions as the ultimate mediator between God
God
and humanity, giving the Imam
Imam
the greatest precedence for interpretation of the Qur'an.[1] As the mediator between God
God
and humanity, the Imam
Imam
is the only one who can properly resolve conflicting interpretations of the Qur'an's words, giving the Imam
Imam
ultimate authority over divine knowledge
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