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Hugh Of Lincoln
Hugh of Lincoln
Hugh of Lincoln
(1135/40 – 16 November 1200), also known as Hugh of Avalon, was a French noble, Benedictine
Benedictine
and Carthusian
Carthusian
monk, bishop of Lincoln in the Kingdom of England, and Catholic saint. At the time of the Reformation, he was the best-known English saint after Thomas Becket.[citation needed] His feast is observed by Catholics on 16 November and by Anglicans on 17 November.Contents1 Life 2 Veneration 3 Iconography 4 Legacy 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] Hugh was born at the château of Avalon,[1] at the border of the Dauphiné
Dauphiné
with Savoy, the son of Guillaume, seigneur of Avalon
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Herleva
Herleva[a] (c. 1003 – c. 1050) was a Norman woman of the 11th century, known for three sons: William I of England
William I of England
"the Conqueror", an illegitimate son fathered by Robert I, Duke of Normandy; and Odo of Bayeux
Bayeux
and Robert, Count of Mortain, who were both fathered by her husband Herluin de Conteville. All three became prominent in William's realm.Contents1 Life1.1 Relationship with Robert the Magnificent 1.2 Marriage to Herluin de Conteville2 Death 3 Notes 4 Sources 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] The background of Herleva
Herleva
and the circumstances of William's birth are shrouded in mystery
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Procurator (Catholic Church)
Corpus Juris CanoniciDecretist Regulæ Juris Decretals of Gregory IXDecretalistDecretum Gratiani Extravagantes Liber SeptimusAncient Church OrdersDidache The Apostolic ConstitutionsCanons of the ApostlesCollections of ancient canonsCollectiones canonum Dionysianae Collectio canonum quadripartita Collectio canonum Quesnelliana Collectio canonum WigorniensisOtherPseudo-Isidorian Decretals Benedictus Deus (Pius IV) Contractum trinius Defect of Birth Jus exclusivae Papal appointmentOriental lawCode of Canons of the Eastern Churches Eastern Canonical Reforms of Pius XII Nomocanon ArcheparchyEparchyLiturgical lawEcclesia Dei Mysterii Paschalis Sacrosanctum conciliumMusicam sacramSummorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudiniSacramental lawCanon 844 Ex opere operato Omnium in mentem Valid but illicitHoly OrdersImpediment (canon law)Abstemius


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Thomas Becket
Thomas Becket
Thomas Becket
(/ˈbɛkɪt/; also known as Saint
Saint
Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas of London,[1] and later Thomas à Becket;[note 1] (21 December c. 1119 (or 1120) – 29 December 1170) was Archbishop of Canterbury
Canterbury
from 1162 until his murder in 1170. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the Anglican Communion. He engaged in conflict with Henry II, King of England, over the rights and privileges of the Church and was murdered by followers of the king in Canterbury
Canterbury
Cathedral
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Calendar Of The Saints
The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".[1] The system arose from the early Christian custom of commemorating each martyr annually on the date of his or her death, or birth into heaven, a date therefore referred to in Latin
Latin
as the martyr's dies natalis ("day of birth")
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Savoy
Savoy
Savoy
(/səˈvɔɪ/;[2] Arpitan: Savouè, IPA: [saˈvwɛ]; French: Savoie
Savoie
[savwa]; Italian: Savoia [saˈvɔːja]; German: Savoyen [zaˈvɔʏ̯ən]) is a cultural region in Western Europe. It comprises roughly the territory of the Western Alps
Western Alps
between Lake Geneva
Lake Geneva
in the north and Dauphiné
Dauphiné
in the south. The historical land of Savoy
Savoy
emerged as the feudal territory of the House of Savoy
House of Savoy
during the 11th to 14th centuries
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Deacon
A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. In many traditions the diaconate is a clerical office; in others it is for laity
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Prior
Prior, derived from the Latin
Latin
for "earlier, first", (or prioress for nuns) is an ecclesiastical title for a superior, usually lower in rank than an abbot or abbess. Its earlier generic usage referred to any monastic superior.Contents1 Monastic superiors1.1 Compound and derived titles2 Other orders 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksMonastic superiors[edit] In the Rule of Saint Benedict, the term appears several times, referring to any superior, whether an abbot, provost, dean, etc. In other old monastic rules the term is used in the same generic sense. With the Cluniac Reforms, the term prior received a specific meaning; it supplanted the provost or dean (praepositus), spoken of in the Rule of St. Benedict
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Saint-Maximin, Isère
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Saint-Maximin is a commune in the Isère
Isère
department in southeastern France. Population[edit]Historical populationYear Pop. ±%1800 681 —    1806 708 +4.0%1821 742 +4.8%1831 714 −3.8%1841 956 +33.9%1851 920 −3.8%1861 835 −9.2%1872 75
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Priesthood (Catholic Church)
The ministerial orders of the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
(for similar but different rules among Eastern Catholics see Eastern Catholic Church) are those of bishop, presbyter (more commonly called priest in English), and deacon. The ordained priesthood and the common priesthood (or priesthood of all the baptized faithful) are different in function and essence.[1][2] The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
teaches that when a man participates in priesthood, he participates in the priesthood of Christ
Christ
Himself
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Benedictine Order
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
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Grande Chartreuse
Grande Chartreuse
Grande Chartreuse
(French: [ɡʁɑ̃d ʃaʁtʁøːz]) is the head monastery of the Carthusian
Carthusian
religious order. It is located in the Chartreuse Mountains, north of the city of Grenoble, in the commune of Saint-Pierre-de-Chartreuse
Saint-Pierre-de-Chartreuse
(Isère), France. Originally, the château belonged to the See of Grenoble. In 1084, Saint Hugh gave it to hermit Saint Bruno and his followers who founded the Carthusian
Carthusian
Order.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Today, visitors are not permitted at Grand Chartreuse, and motor vehicles are prohibited on the surrounding roads
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Henry II Of England
Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189), also known as Henry Curtmantle (French: Court-manteau), Henry FitzEmpress or Henry Plantagenet, ruled as Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Nantes, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland; at various times, he also controlled Wales, Scotland
Scotland
and Brittany. Henry was the son of Geoffrey of Anjou
Anjou
and Matilda, daughter of Henry I of England. He became actively involved by the age of 14 in his mother's efforts to claim the throne of England, then occupied by Stephen of Blois, and was made Duke of Normandy
Duke of Normandy
at 17
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Christian Saint
A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.[1][2] Depending on the context and denomination, the term also retains its original Christian
Christian
meaning, as any believer who is "in Christ" and in whom Christ
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Hermitage (religious Retreat)
Although today's meaning is usually a place where a hermit lives in seclusion from the world, hermitage was more commonly used to mean a settlement where a person or a group of people lived religiously, in seclusion.Contents1 Western Christian tradition 2 Other traditions2.1 Poustinia 2.2 Ashram3 Sources 4 References 5 External linksWestern Christian tradition[edit]Hermitage "Our Lady of the Enclosed Garden" in Warfhuizen, the NetherlandsA hermitage is any type of domestic dwelling in which a hermit lives. While the level of isolation can vary widely, more often than not it is associated with a nearby monastery. Typically, hermitages consist of at least one detached room, or sometimes a dedicated space within an open floor plan building, for religious devotion, basic sleeping accommodations, and a domestic cooking range, suitable for the ascetic lifestyle of the inhabitant
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Selwood Forest
Selwood Forest
Forest
was a large area of woodland on the borders between Somerset, Dorset
Dorset
and Wiltshire
Wiltshire
in south west England. In Anglo-Saxon times it was very substantial, forming a natural barrier between the Anglo-Saxons of Wessex
Wessex
and the Britons of Dumnonia
Dumnonia
and the Severn Valley.[1] The name Selwood is first recorded in Old English around 894 as Seluudu, which some etymologists consider to derive from Sealhwudu or Sallow wood. Selwood may have been the location of the Battle of Peonnum
Battle of Peonnum
in 658. At this battle King Cenwalh of Wessex
Wessex
defeated the Britons and annexed Somerset
Somerset
as far west as the River Parret
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