HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

East Lake (Wuhan)
East Lake (simplified Chinese: 东湖; traditional Chinese: 東湖; pinyin: Dōng Hú) is a large freshwater lake within the city limits of Wuhan, China, the largest[1] or the second largest[2] urban lake in China. Wuhan's East Lake covers an area of 88 square kilometers (33 square kilometers of water area[3]). It is one of the 5A tourist zones of China, and admits over a million people yearly. It is one of the largest sites in Huazhong District. It is also the largest "City Lake" in China. East Lake is made of four areas, Ting Tao, Moshan, Luo Yan Island and Museum of Hubei Province. The East Lake has long been used by local fishermen
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Fu (country Subdivision)
Fu (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a traditional administrative division of Chinese origin used in the East Asian cultural sphere, translated variously as commandery, prefecture, urban prefecture, or city. They were first instituted as a regular form of administrative division of China's Tang Empire, but were later adopted in Vietnam, Japan and Korea
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Li Siguang
Li Siguang (Chinese: 李四光; pinyin: Lǐ Sìguāng; Wade–Giles: Li Ssu-kuang; 1889–1971), also known as J. S. Lee, was a Chinese geologist and politician. He was the founder of China's geomechanics. He was an ethnic Mongol.[1][2] He made outstanding contributions, which changed the situation of "oil deficiency" in the country, enabling the large-scale development of oil fields to raise the country to the ranks of the world's major oil producers. Li was born as Li Zhongkui (李仲揆) in Huanggang, Hubei Province. His paternal grandfather was a Mongolian beggar who migrated to Hubei in search of a better livelihood, and his family originally had the Mongol surname "Kuli" (库里) or "Ku" ().[3] He was often known in English as J. S
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Simplified Chinese Character
Simplified Chinese characters (简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters used in mainland China, as prescribed by Table of General Standard Chinese Characters. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China and Singapore, while traditional Chinese characters are used in Hong Kong, Macau, the Republic of China (Taiwan) and occasionally in the Chinese community of Malaysia and Singapore. Simplified Chinese characters may be referred to by their official name above or colloquially (简体字; jiǎntǐzì)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Yu The Great
Yu the Great (大禹) (c. 2123–2025 BC)[1] was a legendary king in ancient China who was famed for his introduction of flood control, his establishment of the Xia dynasty which inaugurated dynastic rule in China, and his upright moral character.[2][3] He figures prominently in the Chinese legend of "Great Yu Who Controlled the Waters" (Chinese: 大禹治水; pinyin: Dà Yǔ Zhì Shuǐ). The dates which have been proposed for Yu's reign predate the oldest-known written records in China, the oracle bones of the late Shang dynasty, by nearly a millennium.[4] Yu's name was not inscribed on any artifacts which were produced during the proposed era in which he lived, nor was it inscribed on the later oracle bones; his name was first inscribed on vessels which date back to the Western Zhou period (c
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]