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Huai River
The Huai River, formerly romanized as the Hwai, is a major river in China. It is located about midway between the Yellow River
Yellow River
and Yangtze,[1] the two largest rivers in China, and like them runs from west to east. Historically draining directly into the Yellow Sea, floods have changed the course of the river such that it is now a major tributary of the Yangtze. The Huai is notoriously vulnerable to flooding. The Huai River- Qin Mountains
Qin Mountains
line is generally regarded as the geographical dividing line between Northern and southern China. This line approximates the 0 degree January isotherm and the 800 mm isohyet in China
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Huai Of Xia
Huai (Chinese: 槐; read Hui according to Sima Zhen) was the eighth king of the semi-legendary Xia dynasty
Xia dynasty
of ancient China, who possibly ruled 44 years. His other name is Fen (芬). Huai got his throne in the year of Wuzi (戊子), after his father Zhu had died.[1] In the 3rd year of his reign, nine barbarians came to his capital. In the 16th year of his regime, the minister Luobo (洛伯) fought with minister Fengyi (冯夷) at He
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Postal Map Romanization
Postal romanization[1] was a system of transliterating Chinese place names developed by the Imperial Post Office in the early 1900s. The system was in common use until the 1980s. For major cities and other places that already had widely accepted European names, traditional spellings were retained.[2] With regard to other place names, the post office revised policy several times. Spellings given could reflect the local pronunciation, Nanjing pronunciation, or Beijing pronunciation
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Muma River
The Muma River
Muma River
(Muma He[1] 牧马河) is a right tributary of the Han River in the Yangtze river basin of northern China. It has a length of 128 kilometres (80 mi) and a drainage area of 2,782 square kilometres (1,074 sq mi). It originates in and flows entirely within Xixiang County of Shaanxi Province. The annual average flow is 45 cubic metres per second (1,600 cu ft/s)
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Bailong River
The Bailong River
Bailong River
(simplified Chinese: 白龙江; traditional Chinese: 白龍江; pinyin: Báilóng Jiāng; literally: "White Dragon River") is a river 576km long river in the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
basin. From its source to confluence with the Jialing River, the Bailong is actually longer and is thus the main stem of the Jialing River
Jialing River
system. The scenic Jiuzhaigou
Jiuzhaigou
reserve is found along one of the Bailong's tributaries.Contents1 History 2 Course 3 Notes 4 See alsoHistory[edit] In August 2010, heavy rains triggered a mudslide that dammed the river in Zhugqu
Zhugqu
County, Gansu, causing extensive damage and killing over a thousand people.[1][2] Course[edit] The Bailong River, in name, rises in Gansu's Luqu County, just west of the town of Langmusi
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Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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Chiang Kai-shek
Chiang Kai-shek
Chiang Kai-shek
(/ˈtʃæŋ kaɪˈʃɛk, ˈdʒjɑːŋ/;[3] 31 October 1887 – 5 April 1975), also romanized as Chiang Chieh-shih and known as Chiang Chungcheng, was a political and military leader who served as the leader of the Republic of China
Republic of China
between 1928 and 1975. Chiang was an influential member of the Kuomintang
Kuomintang
(KMT), the Chinese Nationalist Party, as well as a close ally of Sun Yat-sen's. Chiang became the Commandant of the Kuomintang's Whampoa Military Academy
Whampoa Military Academy
and took Sun's place as leader of the KMT
KMT
following the Canton Coup
Canton Coup
in early 1926
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Jiangdu
Jiangdu District (simplified Chinese: 江都区; traditional Chinese: 江都區; pinyin: Jiāngdū Qū) is one of three districts of Yangzhou, Jiangsu province, China. It was a county-level city under the administration of Yangzhou until November 2011, when it was converted into a district.[2] Yangzhou Taizhou Airport, which serves the cities of Yangzhou and Taizhou, is located in Dinggou town, Jiangdu. References[edit]www.xzqh.org (in Chinese)^ Google (2014-07-02). "Jiangdu" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 2014-07-02.  ^ 江苏扬州行政区划调整 江都市改区维扬区被撤销 (in Chinese). China Network Television. 14 November 2011
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North China
North China
China
(simplified Chinese: 华北; traditional Chinese: 華北; pinyin: Huáběi; literally "China's north") is a geographical region of China, lying North of the Qinling Huaihe Line.[1]The Qinling Huaihe Line
Qinling Huaihe Line
separates China
China
into its Northern and Southern regionsThe heartland of North China
China
is the North China
China
Plain, or the Yellow River Plain
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Treaty Of Shaoxing
Shaoxing ([ʂâuɕíŋ] ( listen); Chinese: 绍兴) is a prefecture-level city on the southern shore of Hangzhou Bay in eastern Zhejiang province, China. It was formerly known as Kuaiji and Shanyin and abbreviated in Chinese as 越 (Yuè) from the area's former inhabitants. Located on the south bank of the Qiantang River estuary, it borders Ningbo to the east, Taizhou to the southeast, Jinhua to the southwest, and Hangzhou to the west. As of 2010, its population was 4,912,339 inhabitants. Among which, 1,914,683 (Keqiao and Yuecheng districts) lived in the built-up metropolitan area of Hangzhou-Shaoxing, with a total of 8,156,154 inhabitants. Notable residents of Shaoxing include Wang Xizhi, the parents of Zhou Enlai, Lu Xun, and Cai Yuanpei. It is also noted for Shaoxing wine, meigan cai, and stinky tofu, and was recently featured on A Bite of China
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Qin Mountains
The Qinling
Qinling
(Chinese: 秦岭) or Qin Mountains, formerly known as the Nanshan ("Southern Mountains") and sometimes called the "Szechuan Alps", are a major east-west mountain range in southern Shaanxi Province, China. The mountains provide a natural boundary between North and South China
China
and support a huge variety of plant and wildlife, some of which is found nowhere else on earth. To the north is the densely populated Wei River
Wei River
valley, an ancient center of Chinese civilization. To the south is the Han River valley. To the west is the line of mountains along the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau
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Yellow Sea
The Yellow Sea
Sea
or West Sea
Sea
is located between China
China
and Korea. The name is given to the northern part of the East China
China
Sea, which is a marginal sea of the Pacific Ocean. It is located between mainland China
China
and the Korean Peninsula. Its name comes from the sand particles from Gobi Desert
Gobi Desert
sand storms that turn the surface of the water golden yellow. The innermost bay of the Yellow Sea
Sea
is called the Bohai Sea (previously Pechihli Bay or Chihli Bay). Into it flow both the Yellow River (through Shandong
Shandong
province and its capital Jinan) and Hai He (through Beijing
Beijing
and Tianjin)
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Romanization Of Chinese
The Romanization
Romanization
of Chinese is the use of the Latin alphabet to write Chinese. Chinese uses a logographic script, and its characters do not represent phonemes directly. There have been many systems using Roman characters to represent Chinese throughout history. Linguist Daniel Kane recalls, "It used to be said that sinologists had to be like musicians, who might compose in one key and readily transcribe into other keys."[1] However, Hanyu Pinyin
Pinyin
has become the international standard since 1982. Other well-known systems include Wade-Giles and Yale Romanization. There are many uses for Chinese Romanization. Most broadly, it is used to provide a useful way for foreigners who are not skilled at recognizing Chinese script a means to read and recognize Chinese names. Apart from this general role, it serves as a useful tool for foreign learners of Chinese by indicating the pronunciation of unfamiliar characters
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Chi River (Hanshui)
The Chi River (Chinese: 池河; pinyin: Chí Hé) is a Chinese river that is tributary to the Hanshui, or Han River, which ultimately flows into the Yangtze. Its total length is 114 kilometres (71 mi) and drains an area of 1,033 square kilometres (399 sq mi). The difference in elevation between its source and mouth is 1,914 metres (6,280 ft).[1] Notes[edit]^ 王杰等主编 (Wang Jiedeng), ed. (1997). 长江大辞典 (Dictionary of the Yangtze) (in Chinese). Wuhan: 武汉出版社 (Wuhan Press). ISBN 978-7-5430-1615-6. This Shaanxi
Shaanxi
location article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to a river in China is a stub
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Wade–Giles
Wade–Giles (/ˌweɪd ˈdʒaɪlz/), sometimes abbreviated Wade,[citation needed] is a Romanization system for Mandarin Chinese. It developed from a system produced by Thomas Wade, during the mid-19th century, and was given completed form with Herbert A. Giles's Chinese–English Dictionary of 1892. Wade–Giles was the system of transcription in the English-speaking world for most of the 20th century, used in standard reference books and in English language books published before 1979. It replaced the Nanking dialect-based romanization systems that had been common until the late 19th century, such as the Postal Romanization (still used in some place-names). In mainland China it has been entirely replaced by the Hànyǔ Pīnyīn system approved in 1958. Outside mainland China, it has mostly been replaced by Pīnyīn, even though Taiwan implements a multitude of Romanization systems in daily life
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