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Hoysala Empire
The Hoysala empire was a prominent Kannadiga empire that ruled most of the what is now Karnataka, India between the 10th and the 14th centuries. The capital of the Hoysalas was initially located at Belur but was later moved to Halebidu. The Hoysala rulers were originally from Malenadu, an elevated region in the Western Ghats. In the 12th century, taking advantage of the internecine warfare between the Western Chalukya Empire
Western Chalukya Empire
and Kalachuris of Kalyani, they annexed areas of present-day Karnataka
Karnataka
and the fertile areas north of the Kaveri
Kaveri
delta in present-day Tamil Nadu
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Kaveri
Kaveri
Kaveri
(anglicized as Cauvery), also referred as Ponni, is an Indian river flowing through the states of Karnataka
Karnataka
and Tamil Nadu. It is the third largest after Godavari and Krishna in south india and the largest in Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
which on its course, bisects the state into North and South. Originating in the foothills of Western Ghats
Western Ghats
at Talakaveri, Kodagu
Kodagu
in Karnataka
Karnataka
it flows generally south and east through Karnataka
Karnataka
and Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
and across the southern Deccan plateau through the southeastern lowlands, emptying into the Bay of Bengal through two principal mouths in Poompuhar, Tamil Nadu
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Western Ghats
Western Ghats
Western Ghats
also known as Sahyadri (Benevolent Mountains) is a mountain range that runs parallel to the western coast of the Indian peninsula, located entirely in India. It is a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site and is one of the eight "hottest hot-spots" of biological diversity in the world.[1][2] It is sometimes called the Great Escarpment
Escarpment
of India.[3] The range runs north to south along the western edge of the Deccan Plateau, and separates the plateau from a narrow coastal plain, called Konkan, along the Arabian Sea
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Kalachuris Of Kalyani
The Kalachuris (IAST: Kalacuri) were an Indian dynasty that ruled in west-central India
India
between 6th and 7th centuries. They are also known as the Haihayas or as the "early Kalachuris" to distinguish them from their later namesakes. The Kalachuri territory included parts of present-day Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, and Maharashtra. Their capital was probably located at Mahishmati. Epigraphic and numismatic evidence suggests that the earliest of the Ellora
Ellora
and Elephanta cave monuments were built during the Kalachuri rule. The origin of the dynasty is uncertain. In the 6th century, the Kalachuris gained control of the territories formerly ruled by the Guptas, the Vakatakas and the Vishnukundinas. Only three Kalachuri kings are known from inscriptional evidence: Shankaragana, Krishnaraja, and Buddharaja. The Kalachuris lost their power to the Chalukyas of Vatapi
Chalukyas of Vatapi
in the 7th century
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Haleri Kingdom
Kodagu
Kodagu
Kingdom or Haleri Kingdom refers to the monarchistic dynasty that ruled the Kodagu
Kodagu
region of Karnataka
Karnataka
in India
India
for over 200 years between 1600–1834 CE. The kingdom was named after a place called Haleri near Madikeri
Madikeri
which they made as their capital. The Haleri kings were devout Lingayats
Lingayats
and were an offshoot of the Keladi Nayakas, a prominent dynasty that ruled in post-medieval Karnataka. The kingdom's origin is traced to Veeraraja, a nephew of Sadashiva Nayaka of the Keladi dynasty.[1]Contents1 Legacy 2 Monarch 3 Gallery 4 ReferencesLegacy[edit] The present day Madikeri
Madikeri
was formerly known as Muddu raja keri (meaning Mudduraja's town) and was named after the prominent Haleri king, Mudduraja who ruled Kodagu
Kodagu
from 1633-1687
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Telangana
^† Temporary Joint Capital with Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
not more than 10 years ††Common for Telangana
Telangana
and Andhra PradeshSymbols of TelanganaEmblem Kakatiya Kala Thoranam, CharminarLanguageTelugu & UrduSong Jaya Jaya He Telangana
Telangana
Janani Jayakethanam[3]AnimalSpotted deer[3]BirdIndian Roller[3]FlowerSenna auriculata[3]FruitMangoTreeProsopis cineraria[3]RiverGodavari, Krishna River, Manjira River
Manjira River
and Musi RiverSportKabaddi Telangana
Telangana
(/tɛlənˈɡɑːnə/ ( listen)) is a state in the south of India. It is situated on the centre-south stretch of the Indian peninsula on the high Deccan Plateau
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Malenadu
Malenadu is a region in the state of Karnataka in India. Malenadu covers the western and eastern slopes of the Western Ghats or Sahyadri mountain range, and is roughly 100 kilometers in width. It is situated between Coastal Karnataka and Bayaluseeme regions of Karnataka.Contents1 Climate 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksClimate[edit] The Malenadu region is humid and has an annual rainfall of 1,000–3,800 mm (39–150 in).[1] Sakleshpur, Kottigehara (Attigere) in Mudigere taluk and Agumbe in Shimoga district and Hassan district receives the highest rainfall in Karnataka (close to 10,000 mm (390 in)). See also[edit]Coastal Karnataka North Karnataka South KarnatakaReferences[edit]^ "Climate and Rainfall – Karnataka"
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Monarchy
A monarchy is a form of government in which a group, generally a family representing a dynasty (aristocracy), embodies the country's national identity and its head, the monarch, exercises the role of sovereignty. The actual power of the monarch may vary from purely symbolic (crowned republic), to partial and restricted (constitutional monarchy), to completely autocratic (absolute monarchy). Traditionally the monarch's post is inherited and lasts until death or abdication. In contrast, elective monarchies require the monarch to be elected.[1] Both types have further variations as there are widely divergent structures and traditions defining monarchy. For example, in some[which?] elected monarchies only pedigrees are taken into account for eligibility of the next ruler, whereas many hereditary monarchies impose requirements regarding the religion, age, gender, mental capacity, etc
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Monarch
A monarch is a sovereign head of state in a monarchy.[1][2] A monarch may exercise the highest authority and power in the state, or others may wield that power on behalf of the monarch. Typically a monarch either personally inherits the lawful right to exercise the state's sovereign rights (often referred to as the throne or the crown) or is selected by an established process from a family or cohort eligible to provide the nation's monarch. Alternatively, an individual may become monarch by conquest, acclamation or a combination of means
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Andhra Pradesh
^† The Andhra Pradesh Reorganisation Act, 2014
Andhra Pradesh Reorganisation Act, 2014
states that Hyderabad is common capital of both Telangana
Telangana
and Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
states for a period of time not exceeding 10 years. †† Common for Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
and Telangana.Symbols of Andhra PradeshEmblem Poorna kumbhamLanguageTeluguSong Maa Telugu ThallikiDanceKuchipudiAnimalBlackbuckBirdIndian rollerFlowerBlue-Water LillyFruitMangoTreeNeemRiver Godavari, Krishna, Penna, Vamsadhara, Nagavali and TungabhadraSportKabaddiCostume Saree Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
(/ˌɑːndrə prəˈdɛʃ/) ( pronunciation (help·info)) is one of the 29 states of India
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Tamil Nadu
^# Jana Gana Mana
Jana Gana Mana
is the national anthem, while "Invocation to Tamil Mother" is the state song/anthem. ^† Established in 1773; Madras State was formed in 1950 and renamed as Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
on 14 January 1969[9] ^^ Tamil is the official language of the state. English is declared as an additional official language for communication purposes.[8]SymbolsEmblem Srivilliputhur
Srivilliputhur
Andal templeLanguageTamilSong"Invocation to Goddess Tamil"DanceBharathanattiyamAnimalNilgiri tahrBirdEmerald doveFlowerGloriosa lilyTreePalm treeSportKabaddi Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
(Tamil pronunciation: [t̪amiɻ n̪aːᶑu] ( listen) literally 'The Land of Tamils' or 'Tamil Country') is one of the 29 states of India. Its capital and largest city is Chennai
Chennai
(formerly known as Madras)
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Etymology Of Karnataka
Etymology
Etymology
(/ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the study of the history of words, their origins, and how their form and meaning have changed over time.[1] By extension, the term "the etymology (of a word)" means the origin of the particular word. For a language such as Greek with a long written history, etymologists make use of texts in these languages and texts about the languages to gather knowledge about how words were used during earlier periods of their history and when they entered the languages in question. Etymologists also apply the methods of comparative linguistics to reconstruct information about languages that are too old for any direct information to be available. By analyzing related languages with a technique known as the comparative method, linguists can make inferences about their shared parent language and its vocabulary
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Chennakesava Temple, Somanathapura
The Chennakesava Temple, also referred to as Chennakeshava Temple, Keshava
Keshava
Temple or Kesava Temple, is a Vaishnava
Vaishnava
Hindu temple
Hindu temple
on the banks of River Kaveri
Kaveri
at Somanathapura, Karnataka, India. The temple was consecrated in 1258 CE by Somanatha Dandanayaka, a general of the Hoysala King Narasimha
Narasimha
III. It is located 38 kilometres (24 mi) east of Mysuru
Mysuru
city.[2][note 1] The ornate temple is a model illustration of the Hoysala architecture. The temple is enclosed in a courtyard with a pillared corridor of small shrines (damaged)
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Jainism
Jainism
Jainism
(/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/),[1] traditionally known as Jain
Jain
Dharma,[2] is an ancient Indian religion.[3] Followers of Jainism
Jainism
are called "Jains", a word derived from the Sanskrit word jina (victor) and connoting the path of victory in crossing over life's stream of rebirths through an ethical and spiritual life.[4] Jains
Jains
trace their history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviors and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who is believed to have lived millions of years ago, and twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra
Mahāvīra
around 500 BCE
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Deccan Plateau
The Deccan Plateau[1] is a large plateau in southern India. It rises to 100 metres (330 ft) in the north, and to more than 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) in the south, forming a raised triangle within the South-pointing triangle of the Indian subcontinent's coastline.[2] It extends over eight Indian states and encompasses a wide range of habitats, covering most of central and southern India.[3] The plateau is located between two mountain ranges, the Western Ghats and the Eastern Ghats, each of which rises from its respective nearby coastal plain, and almost converge at the southern tip of India. It is separated from the Gangetic plain
Gangetic plain
to the north by the Satpura and Vindhya Ranges, which form its northern boundary
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