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House Of Châteaudun
The House of Châteaudun is a medieval lineage that once possessed the Viscounty of Châteaudun, the County of Perche, and the County of Anjou.Contents1 Origin of the House of Châteaudun 2 Branches of the House of Châteaudun 3 Genealogy 4 Sources 5 ReferencesOrigin of the House of Châteaudun[edit] The House of Châteaudun descended from Gauzfred I (or Geoffrey I) whom Count Theobald I of Blois made Viscount of Châteaudun in 956. Recent research makes him a direct-line agnatic descendant of the Frankish family Rorgonides. For a list of the Counts and Viscounts of Châteaudun, see the article Counts of Châteaudun. Branches of the House of Châteaudun[edit] The House of Châteaudun split in two distinct branches
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Counts And Viscounts Of Châteaudun
The County of Châteaudun
Châteaudun
was held in the 9th century by counts who also held the County of Blois. Theobald I (the Trickster) created the first Viscount of Châteaudun
Châteaudun
with the appointment of Geoffrey I, founder of the House of Châteaudun. The viscounts were entrusted with the government of the county of Châteaudun, records of whom are continuous from the mid-10th century. The actual rule of Châteaudun between the late 9th and the mid-10th centuries, and the relationships between the count and viscounts, is unceratin
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Geoffrey V, Count Of Anjou
Geoffrey V (24 August 1113 – 7 September 1151) — called the Handsome or the Fair (French: le Bel) and Plantagenet — was the Count of Anjou, Touraine, and Maine by inheritance from 1129 and then Duke of Normandy
Duke of Normandy
by conquest from 1144. By his marriage to the Empress Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England, Geoffrey had a son, Henry Curtmantle, who succeeded to the English throne as King Henry II (1154-1189) and was the first of the Plantagenet dynasty
Plantagenet dynasty
to rule England; the name "Plantagenet" was taken from Geoffrey's epithet
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Rotrou Iii, Count Of Perche
Rotrou III (bef. 1080 – [20 January/6 May] 1144), called the Great (le Grand), was the Count of Perche
Count of Perche
and Mortagne from 1099. He was the son of Geoffrey II, Count of Perch, and Beatrix de Ramerupt, daughter of Hilduin IV, Count of Montdidier. He was a notable Crusader and a participant in the Reconquista
Reconquista
in eastern Spain, even ruling the city of Tudela in Navarre
Navarre
from 1123 to 1131
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List Of Counts And Dukes Of Vendôme
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Vendôme
Vendôme
(French pronunciation: ​[vɑ̃dom]) is a town in central France
France
and is a subprefecture of the department of Loir-et-Cher. It is also the department's third biggest town. It is one of the main towns along the river Loir. The river divides itself at the entrance of Vendôme, intersecting it into numerous different arms
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Geoffrey III, Viscount Of Châteaudun
Geoffrey III (Geoffroy III) (died 1145), Viscount of Châteaudun, son of Hugues III, Viscount of Châteaudun, and Agnes, Comtesse de Fréteval, daughter of Foucher, Seigneur de Fréteval, and Hildeburge Goët. Geoffrey was also Seigneur of Mondoubleau by virtue of his marriage. This resulted in a significant increase in the holdings of the family of Châteaudun. Geoffrey battled his cousin Urso, Seigneur de Fréteval, son of Nivelon III de Fréteval, brother of Geoffrey’s mother, resulting in his capture in 1136. Geoffrey's son Hugues managed to rescue his father with the help of Geoffroy III, Count of Vendome. Geoffrey and his family were closely associated with the Church of Saint-Léonard de Bellême, built circa 960 by Yves de Creil, donating it to the town of Marmoutier
Marmoutier
in 1092. Although not generally know, Geoffrey was an important figure in the founding of the Knights Templar
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Fulk, King Of Jerusalem
Fulk (Latin: Fulco, French: Foulque or Foulques; c. 1089/92 – 13 November 1143), also known as Fulk the Younger, was the Count of Anjou (as Fulk V) from 1109 to 1129 and the King of Jerusalem
King of Jerusalem
from 1131 to his death. During his reign, the Kingdom of Jerusalem
Kingdom of Jerusalem
reached its largest territorial extent.Contents1 Biography1.1 Count of Anjou 1.2 Crusader and King 1.3 Securing the borders 1.4 Death2 Legacy2.1 Depictions 2.2 Family3 Ancestors 4 References 5 Sources 6 Historical FictionBiography[edit] Count of Anjou[edit] Fulk was born at Angers, between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou
Anjou
and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France. He became count of Anjou
Anjou
upon his father's death in 1109
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King Of Jerusalem
The King of Jerusalem[1] was the supreme ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, the Crusader state
Crusader state
founded by Christian princes in 1099 when the First Crusade
First Crusade
took the city. Godfrey of Bouillon, the first ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, himself refused the title of king, and instead chose the title "Defender of the Holy Sepulchre". Thus, the title of king was only introduced for his successor, King Baldwin I in 1100. The city of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
was lost in 1187, but the Kingdom of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
survived, moving its capital to Acre in 1191. The city of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
was re-captured in the Sixth Crusade, during 1229–39 and 1241–44
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Elias II, Count Of Maine
Elias II (also Helias, Hélie, Helyes or Élie) (died 15 January 1151) was the younger son of Fulk V of Anjou
Fulk V of Anjou
and his first wife, Eremburga, daughter of Count Elias I of Maine. There is debate as to whether he was ever count of Maine or whether he merely made a claim to it. Elias was born no earlier than May 1114.[1] By 1129, Elias had married Philippa, daughter of Count Rotrou III of Perche.[2] It is possible but unlikely that Elias' father left him the county of Maine; his elder brother, Geoffrey Plantagenet was ruler of Anjou, Maine and the Touraine. Elias rebelled in 1145 with the support of Lord Robert III of Sablé, sparking a conflict known in Angevin historiography as the "war of the barons" (guerra baronum). This war may have dragged on into 1146, but in the end Elias was captured and imprisoned by his brother. According to the Gesta consulum Andegavorum, Elias, acting "by the counsel of wicked men ..
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Rotrou IV, Count Of Perche
Rotrou IV (1135-1191), Count of Perche, son of Rotrou III, Count of Perche, and Hawise, daughter of Walter of Salisbury, and Sibilla de Chaworth. Rotrou was from the House of Châteaudun and descended from the Viscounts of Châteaudun. His mother was a sister of Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury. Patrick’s sister Sibyll married John FitzGilbert, the Marshal of the Horses, whose son Henry was Bishop of Exeter
Bishop of Exeter
and a knight in the service of Rotrou. Upon the death of his father in 1144, Rotrou continued the fight against his archenemy, William III Talvas, Count of Ponthieu and Lord of Alençon. Not withstanding a long-running blood feud, his uncle Patrick had married William Talvas' daughter Adela as her second husband. From 1152, he fought with Louis VII the Younger against Henry II of England in an ineffective war that saw their troops routed, lands ravaged and property stolen
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Stephen Du Perche
Stephen du Perche (1137/8–1169) was the chancellor of the Kingdom of Sicily (1166–68) and Archbishop of Palermo
Archbishop of Palermo
(1167–68) during the early regency of his cousin, the queen dowager Margaret of Navarre (1166–71). Stephen's relation to Margaret of Navarre is unknown, as is his parentage. He is described by the contemporary chronicler Hugo Falcandus as "a son of the count of Perche", Rotrou III.[1] He was a young man when he entered politics, born at the earliest in 1137 or 1138. He may have been named after King Stephen of England, at the time ruling the Duchy of Normandy.[2]Contents1 Arrival in Italy 2 Conflict with Matthew of Ajello 3 Deposition and exile by a conspiracy 4 Sources 5 NotesArrival in Italy[edit] In 1166, Margaret appealed to her other cousin, Rotrou, Archbishop of Rouen, to send her a family member to aid and support her in government
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Hugh V, Viscount Of Châteaudun
Hugues IV (died 1180), Viscount of Châteaudun, son of Geoffrey III, Viscount of Châteaudun, and Helvise, Dame of Mondoubleau, daughter of Ilbert “Payen” de Mondoubleau. He became Lord of Mondoubleau upon his mother’s death, based on her inheritance, and acquired the lordship of Saint-Calais by marriage. Hugues’ father, in a conflict with his uncle Urso, Seigneur de Fréteval, was captured and imprisoned. He was rescued by Hugues with the help of Geoffroy III, Count of Vendôme. Hugues took his first trip to the Holy Land with his father in 1140. In 1059, Hugues’ second trip to the Holy Land was accompanied by encroachments of his land by his third cousin Rotrou IV, Count of Perche. In response, Hugues captured the land of Villemans, to the detriment of the church and priory of the Holy Sepulchre of Châteaudun. Yves, Abbot of Saint-Denis Nogent-le-Rotrou, supported Rotrou is this dispute
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Kings Of Jerusalem
The King of Jerusalem[1] was the supreme ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, the Crusader state
Crusader state
founded by Christian princes in 1099 when the First Crusade
First Crusade
took the city. Godfrey of Bouillon, the first ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, himself refused the title of king, and instead chose the title "Defender of the Holy Sepulchre". Thus, the title of king was only introduced for his successor, King Baldwin I in 1100. The city of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
was lost in 1187, but the Kingdom of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
survived, moving its capital to Acre in 1191. The city of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
was re-captured in the Sixth Crusade, during 1229–39 and 1241–44
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Geoffrey III, Count Of Anjou
Geoffrey III of Anjou
Anjou
(in French Geoffroy III d' Anjou) (1040–1096), called le Barbu ("the Bearded"), was count of Anjou
Anjou
1060-68.Contents1 Early life 2 Military career 3 Family 4 Notes 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Geoffrey, born c. 1040, was the eldest son of Geoffrey II, Count of Gâtinais and Ermengarde of Anjou, the daughter of Fulk III of Anjou.[1][2] Both he and his younger brother Fulk, called le Réchin, were taken under the wing of their uncle, Geoffrey Martel and both were knighted by him in 1060
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Geoffrey III, Count Of Perche
Geoffrey III (d. 1202), Count of Perche
Count of Perche
(1191-1202), son of Rotrou IV, Count of Perche, and Matilda of Blois-Champagne, daughter of Theobald II, Count of Champagne, and Matilda of Carinthia. He accompanied his father to the Third Crusade
Third Crusade
and participated in the Siege of Acre, where his father was killed. Back from the Holy Land, he sold more land to the abbeys in order to replenish his finances depleted by his participation in the crusade. He then fought Richard the Lionheart under the banner of the Philip II of France
Philip II of France
and in 1194, he managed to recover the commune of Bonsmoulins
Bonsmoulins
that his father had yielded to Henry II. When Richard sent an army to regain control of Normandy, Geoffroy, as a French army commander, helped defeat him
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William II, Count Of Perche
William II (died 1226), Count of Perche
Count of Perche
and Bishop of Châlons, son of Rotrou IV, Count of Perche, and Matilda of Blois-Champagne, daughter of Theobald II, Count of Champagne, and Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia. He began his career as treasurer and provost of the Church of St. Martin of Tours, and was elected Bishop of Chalons in 1215, consecrated in 1216. The following year he succeeded his nephew Thomas, as Count of Perche, who was killed in the Battle of Lincoln. He made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1225, but died on the return trip. The House of Perche ended with his death, but several heirs attempted to revive the estate. Louis VIII the Lion
Louis VIII the Lion
argued the right of reversion and annexed the county of Perche to Peter, Count of Alençon
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