HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Houara
Houara (Berber: Ihuwwaren, Arabic: هوارة‎), also spelled Hawwara, is a large Berber tribe spread widely in the Maghreb (Tamazgha) and has descendants in Upper Egypt. Houara are amongst the most prominent tribes in Upper Egypt, with branches found mainly in Sohag, Qena, and Asyut. They are considered to be the aristocracy of Sohag to this day. Hawwara tribes were deemed to be the real rulers of the region, up until the campaigns of Ibrahim Pasha in 1813, which finally crushed their influence.[1] During the Mamluk rule in Egypt, the Hawwara were the most dominant tribe in Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
under the leadership of Sheikh
Sheikh
Hammam.[2] Sultan Barquq
Barquq
made relationships with the Hawwara in order to keep the Arab tribes from becoming powerful.[3] Towards the end of the Mamluk dynasty, the Hawwara and Arabs
Arabs
began cooperating to kill Mamluks
[...More...]

picture info

Berber Languages
The Berber languages, also known as Berber or the Amazigh languages[2] (Berber name: Tamaziɣt, Tamazight; Neo-Tifinagh: ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ, Tuareg
Tuareg
Tifinagh: ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵗⵜ, ⵝⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵗⵝ, pronounced [tæmæˈzɪɣt], [θæmæˈzɪɣθ]), are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family. They comprise a group of closely related dialects spoken by the Berbers, who are indigenous to North Africa.[3] The languages were traditionally written with the ancient Libyco-Berber script, which now exists in the form of Tifinagh.[4] Berber is spoken by large populations of Morocco, Algeria
Algeria
and Libya, by smaller populations of Tunisia, northern Mali, western and northern Niger, northern Burkina Faso
Burkina Faso
and Mauritania
Mauritania
and in the Siwa Oasis
Siwa Oasis
of Egypt
[...More...]

picture info

Ibrahim Pasha Of Egypt
Wāli
Wāli
of Egypt, Sudan, Syria
Syria
(incl
[...More...]

picture info

Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎, al-ʻarabiyyah, [al ʕaraˈbijja] (listen) or عَرَبِيّ‎, ʻarabī, [ˈʕarabiː] (listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Semitic language that first emerged in the 1st to 4th centuries CE.[5] It is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[6] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living in the area bounded by Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east and the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in Northwestern Arabia
Arabia
and in the Sinai Peninsula. The ISO classifies Arabic
Arabic
as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic,[7] which is derived from Classical Arabic
[...More...]

picture info

Musulamii
The Musulamii
Musulamii
were a confederation of the Berber Gaetulian tribes,[1] who inhabited the desert regions of what is today known as Chotts Regions in Tunisia
Tunisia
and Algeria, as well as the Roman province of Mauretania Caesariensis, which was annexed to the Roman empire in 44 AD
[...More...]

Jarawa (Berber Tribe)
Jarawa may refer to:Jarawas (Andaman Islands), one of the indigenous peoples of the Andaman Islands Jarawa language (Andaman Islands) Jarawa (Berber tribe), a Berber tribal confederacy that flourished in northwest Africa during the seventh century Jarawa (Nigeria), an ethnic group in Plateau State, Nigeria
[...More...]

picture info

Sheikh
Sheikh
Sheikh
(pronounced /ʃeɪk/ SHAYK or /ʃiːk/ SHEEK; Arabic: شيخ‎ šayḫ [ʃæjx], mostly pronounced [ʃeːx/ʃejx], plural شيوخ šuyūḫ [ʃuju:x])—also transliterated Sheik, Shykh, Shaik, Shayk, Shaykh, Cheikh, Shekh, and Shaikh—is an honorific title in the Arabic
Arabic
language. It commonly designates the ruler of a tribe, who inherited the title from his father. "Sheikh" is given to a royal male at birth, whereas the related title "Sheikha" is given to a royal female at birth.Contents1 Etymology and meaning 2 Sufi term 3 Regional usage3.1 Arabian Peninsula 3.2 Lebanon 3.3 Maghreb 3.4 Horn of Africa 3.5 West Africa 3.6 South Asia 3.7 Southeast Asia4 For women 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksEtymology and meaning[edit]Kurdish sheikhs, 1895The word in Arabic
Arabic
stems from a triliteral root connected with age and aging: ش-ي-خ, shīn-yā'-khā'
[...More...]

picture info

Arabs
Historically: Arabian mythology (Hubal · al-Lāt · Al-‘Uzzá · Manāt · Other Goddesses) Predominantly: Islam (Sunni · Shia · Sufi · Ibadi · Alawite · Ismaili) Sizable minority: Christianity (Eastern Orthodox · Maronite · Coptic Orthodox · Greek Orthodox · Greek Catholic · Chaldean Christian) Smaller minority: Other monotheistic religions (Druze · Bahá'í Faith · Sabianism · Bábism · Mandaeism)Related ethnic groupsOther Afroasiatic-speaking peoplesa Arab
Arab
ethnicity should not be confused with non- Arab
Arab
ethnicities that are also native to the Arab
Arab
world.[30] b Not all Arabs
Arabs
are Muslims
Muslims
and not all Muslims
Muslims
are Arabs
[...More...]

picture info

Barquq
Al-Malik Az-Zahir Sayf ad-Din Barquq
Barquq
(Arabic: الملك الظاهر سيف الدين برقوق‎) (ruled 1382–1389 and 1390 –1399) was the first Sultan
Sultan
of the
[...More...]

picture info

Mamluk Sultanate (Cairo)
in Anatolia Artuqid dynasty Saltuqid dynasty in Azerbaijan Ahmadili dynasty Ildenizid dynasty in Egypt Tulunid dynasty Ikhshidid dynasty in Fars Salghurid dynasty in The Levant Burid dynasty Zengid dynastyThis box:view talk editThe Mamluk
Mamluk
Sultanate (Arabic: سلطنة المماليك‎ Salṭanat al-Mamālīk) was a medieval realm spanning Egypt, the Levant, and Hejaz. It lasted from the overthrow of the Ayyubid dynasty until the Ottoman conquest of Egypt
Egypt
in 1517. Historians have traditionally broken the era of Mamlūk rule into two periods—one covering 1250–1382, the other, 1382–1517. Western historians call the former the "Baḥrī" period and the latter the "Burjī" due to the political dominance of the regimes known by these names during the respective eras
[...More...]

picture info

Arabized Berber
Arabized Berber
Arabized Berber
denotes an inhabitant of the Maghreb
Maghreb
region in northwestern Africa, whose native language is a local dialect of Arabic and whose origins are Berber. The expression holds that most populations in North Africa
Africa
are of Berber heritage, including those inhabiting Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Western Sahara, and Mauritania
[...More...]

picture info

Aristocracy (class)
The aristocracy is a social class that a particular society considers its highest order. In many states, the aristocracy included the upper class of people (aristocrats) with hereditary rank and titles. In some—such as ancient Greece, Rome and India—aristocratic status came from belonging to a military caste, although it has also been common, notably in African societies, for aristocrats to belong to priestly dynasties. Aristocratic status can involve feudal or legal privileges.[1] They are usually below only the monarch of a country or nation in its social hierarchy
[...More...]

picture info

Tamazgha
Tamazgha
Tamazgha
(Berber languages: Tamazɣa, Tifinagh: ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵗⴰ or ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵖⴰ) is a Berber language
Berber language
toponym denoting the Greater Maghreb, the lands traditionally inhabited by Berbers (Mazice/Amazigh). The region encompasses the geographical area between the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
and the Niger
Niger
River, a large swathe of territory spanning Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Mali, Niger, Egypt
Egypt
and the Canary Islands.[1] Although the Berber linguistic root MZƔ or ZƔ is ancient, Tamazɣa as a toponym is derived from the Berber language, coined in the context of Berber nationalism. It appeared for the first time in Algeria
Algeria
and Morocco
Morocco
in the 1970s. It is not clear at all who coined it
[...More...]

picture info

Qena Governorate
Qena
Qena
Governorate (Egyptian Arabic: محافظة قنا‎ Muḥāfẓet Qinā) is one of the governorates of Egypt. Located in the southern part of the country, it covers a stretch of the Nile valley. Its capital is the city of Qena.Contents1 Population 2 Cities 3 Industrial zones 4 Projects 5 Other important sites 6 ReferencesPopulation[edit] According to population estimates from 2015 the majority of residents in the governorate live in rural areas, with an urbanization rate of only 19.7%. Out of an estimated 3,045,504 people residing in the governorate, 2,445,051 people live in rural areas as opposed to only 600,453 in urban areas
[...More...]

picture info

Sohag Governorate
Sohag
Sohag
Governorate (Egyptian Arabic: محافظة سوهاج‎ Muḥāfẓet Sohag) is one of the governorates of Egypt. It is located in the southern part of the country (Upper Egypt), and covers a stretch of the Nile Valley. Since 1960, its capital has been the city of Sohag. Prior to that, the capital was the city of Girga
Girga
and the name of the governorate was Girga
Girga
Governorate.[2]Contents1 Population 2 Cities 3 Industrial zones 4 Important sites 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksPopulation[edit] According to population estimates from 2015 the majority of residents in the governorate live in rural areas, with an urbanization rate of only 21.4%
[...More...]

picture info

Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
(Arabic: صعيد مصر‎ Ṣaʿīd Miṣr, shortened to الصعيد aṣ-Ṣeʿīd; pronounced [esˤːe.ˈʕiːd], Coptic: ⲙⲁⲣⲏⲥ) is the strip of land on both sides of the Nile
Nile
that extends between Nubia
Nubia
and downriver (northwards) to Lower Egypt.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Predynastic Egypt 2.2 Dynastic Egypt 2.3 Medieval Egypt 2.4 20th-century Egypt3 List of rulers of prehistoric Upper Egypt 4 List of nomes 5 See also 6 Further reading 7 Notes 8 References8.1 Bibliography9 External linksGeography[edit] Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
is between the Cataracts of the Nile
Nile
above modern-day Aswan, downriver (northwards) to the area between Dahshur
Dahshur
and El-Ayait,[citation needed] which is south of modern-day Cairo
[...More...]

.