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Horace Trumbauer
Horace Trumbauer
Horace Trumbauer
(December 28, 1868 – September 18, 1938) was a prominent American architect of the Gilded Age, known for designing residential manors for the wealthy. Later in his career he also designed hotels, office buildings, and much of the campus of Duke University. Trumbauer's massive palaces flattered the egos of his "robber baron" clients, but were dismissed by his professional peers. His work made him a wealthy man, but his buildings rarely received positive critical recognition
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Agnes Irwin School
The Agnes Irwin School is an all-girls, non-sectarian college preparatory day school for students from pre-kindergarten through grade 12. It was founded in 1869 by Agnes Irwin in Philadelphia. Irwin, a great-great-granddaughter of Benjamin Franklin, later became the first dean of Radcliffe College. In 1933, the campus moved to Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, and then to its present location in Rosemont in 1961.Contents1 Location and campus 2 Enrollment 3 Diversity 4 Academics 5 Administration 6 Tuition 7 Need-Based Tuition Assistance 8 Transportation 9 Extracurricular 10 Accreditation and associations 11 Notable alumnae 12 Summer at AIS: Adventures for the Independent Spirit 13 References 14 External linksLocation and campus[edit] The campus in Rosemont, is 10 miles (16 km) west of Philadelphia. The eighteen-acre campus in a suburban setting includes a self-contained Lower School with its own gym, dining room, library, and arts, science and music rooms
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Isidor Straus
Isidor Straus
Isidor Straus
(February 6, 1845 – April 15, 1912) was a German-born American businessman, politician, and co-owner of Macy's
Macy's
department store, along with his brother Nathan. He also served for just over a year as a member of the United States House of Representatives.[2] He died with his wife, Ida, in the sinking of the passenger ship RMS Titanic.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Marriage and children 4 Political career 5 Death on the Titanic 6 Memorials 7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Isidor Straus
Isidor Straus
was born into a Jewish family in Otterberg
Otterberg
in the former Palatinate, then ruled by the Kingdom of Bavaria. He was the first of five children of Lazarus Straus (1809–1898) and his second wife Sara (1823–1876)
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Jeffrey Epstein
Jeffrey Edward Epstein (born January 20, 1953) is an American financier and registered sex offender in the United States.[1] He worked at Bear Stearns
Bear Stearns
early in his career and then formed his own firm, J. Epstein & Co. In 2008, Epstein was convicted of soliciting an underage girl for prostitution, for which he served 13 months in prison.[2] He lives in the United States
United States
Virgin Islands.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Residences 4 Science philanthropy 5 Criminal proceedings5.1 Sentencing 5.2 Reactions 5.3 Suit against federal government re: plea deal6 Civil proceedings 7 Virginia Roberts lawsuits 8 Personal life 9 References 10 See also 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Epstein was born in Brooklyn, New York, to a middle class Jewish family. His father worked for New York City's parks.[3] Epstein attended Lafayette High School
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Reading Company
The Reading Company
Reading Company
(/ˈrɛdɪŋ/ RED-ing) was a company that was involved in the railroad industry in southeast Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and neighboring states from 1924 until 1976. Commonly called the Reading Railroad
Railroad
and logotyped as Reading Lines, the Reading Company
Reading Company
was a railroad holding company for the majority of its existence and was a (single) railroad during its later years. It was a successor to the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and Reading Railway Company founded in 1833
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Jeffrey Epstein VI Foundation
The Jeffrey Epstein VI Foundation is a private science foundation known for establishing the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics at Harvard University with a $30 million gift to the university.[1] The Program for Evolutionary Dynamics is considered the first department of its kind to study the evolution of molecular biology with the sole use of mathematics
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Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(/ˌpɛnsɪlˈveɪniə/ ( listen); Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is the 33rd-largest, the 5th-most populous, and the 9th-most densely populated of the 50 United States
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University Of Pennsylvania
The University
University
of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(commonly known as Penn or UPenn) is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university located in the University
University
City section of Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University
University
of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities
Association of American Universities
and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[5] Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology, though his proposed curriculum was never adopted
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Cirrhosis
Cirrhosis
Cirrhosis
is a condition in which the liver does not function properly due to long-term damage.[1] This damage is characterized by the replacement of normal liver tissue by scar tissue.[1] Typically, the disease develops slowly over months or years.[1] Early on, there are often no symptoms.[1] As the disease worsens, a person may become tired, weak, itchy, have swelling in the lower legs, develop yellow skin, bruise easily, have fluid build up in the abdomen, or develop spider-like blood vessels on the skin.[1] The fluid build-up in the abdomen may become spontaneously infected.[1] Other complicatio
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West Laurel Hill Cemetery
West Laurel Hill Cemetery
Cemetery
is a cemetery located in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, United States
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Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania
Bala Cynwyd ( /ˈbælə ˈkɪnwʊd/ BAL-ə-KIN-wuud)[1] is a community in Lower Merion Township which is located on the Main Line in southeastern Pennsylvania, bordering the western edge of Philadelphia at US Route 1 (City Avenue). It was originally two separate towns, Bala and Cynwyd, but is commonly treated as a single community. This came about when a single US Post Office served both towns (the "Bala Cynwyd" Branch) using ZIP code
ZIP code
19004. The community was long known as hyphenated Bala-Cynwyd
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Architectural Record
Architectural Record
Architectural Record
is an American monthly magazine that is dedicated to architecture and interior design. Published by BNP Media,[1] it is generally considered "The Record" of Architectural History.[2] Throughout its 125 years in print, Architectural Record
Architectural Record
has fostered readership among architecture, engineering, and design professionals by featuring articles that showcase noteworthy architectural works throughout the global landscape. News, commentary, criticism, and continuing-education sections outline the scope of content
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RMS Titanic
RMS Titanic
Titanic
(/taɪˈtænɪk/) was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton
Southampton
to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff
Harland and Wolff
shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.[2] Titanic
Titanic
was under the command of Edward Smith, who also went down with the ship
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Harry Elkins Widener
Harry Elkins Widener
Harry Elkins Widener
(January 3, 1885 – April 15, 1912) was an American businessman and bibliophile, and a member of the Widener family. His mother built Harvard University's Widener Memorial Library in his memory, after his death on the foundering of the RMS Titanic.Contents1 Biography 2 As book collector 3 Further reading 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit]Widener's 1908 bookplate[1]Widener LibraryLetter to a friend: "We ... return on April 10th on the maiden voyage of the Titanic ..."Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Widener was the son of George Dunton Widener (1861–1912) and Eleanor Elkins Widener, and the grandson of entrepreneur Peter A. B. Widener
Peter A. B. Widener
(1834–1915)
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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