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Hopewell Culture
The Hopewell tradition
Hopewell tradition
(also called the Hopewell culture) describes the common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States
United States
from 200 BCE to 500 CE, in the Middle Woodland
Middle Woodland
period. The Hopewell tradition was not a single culture or society, but a widely dispersed set of related populations. They were connected by a common network of trade routes,[1] known as the Hopewell exchange system. At its greatest extent, the Hopewell exchange system ran from the Crystal River Indian Mounds
Crystal River Indian Mounds
in modern-day Florida
Florida
as far north as the Canadian shores of Lake Ontario. Within this area, societies participated in a high degree of exchange with the highest amount of activity along waterways
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Grizzly Bear
The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos ssp.) is a large subspecies of brown bear inhabiting North America. Scientists generally do not use the name grizzly bear but call it the North American brown bear. Multiple morphological forms sometimes recognized as subspecies exist, including the mainland grizzly (Ursus arctos horribilis), Kodiak bear (U. a. middendorffi), peninsular grizzly (U. a. gyas), and the recently extinct California
California
grizzly (U. a. californicus†)[1][2] and Mexican grizzly bear
Mexican grizzly bear
(U. a. nelsoni†). On average bears near the coast tend to be larger while inland grizzlies tend to be smaller. The Ussuri brown bear
Ussuri brown bear
(U. a
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Earlham College
Earlham College
Earlham College
is a private, liberal arts college in Richmond, Indiana. Established in 1847 by the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), Earlham welcomes students of all faiths and offers an education rooted in such Quaker
Quaker
values as integrity, a commitment to peace and social justice, mutual respect and community decision-making. Earlham is ranked 29th (98th percentile) among 1,533 U.S. institutions of higher learning in the percentage of graduates who go on to receive Ph.D.s, and is 10th (99th percentile) in producing Ph.D.s in the biological sciences and 14th (99th percentile) in the life sciences. In 2016, Earlham ranked number 61 among national liberal arts colleges by U.S
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Chillicothe, Ohio
Chillicothe (/ˌtʃɪlɪˈkɒθi/ CHIL-i-KOTH-ee)[6] is a city in and the county seat of Ross County, Ohio, United States.[7] Located along the Scioto River, Chillicothe was the first and third capital of Ohio. It is the only city in Ross County and the center of the Chillicothe Micropolitan Statistical Area (as defined by the United States Census Bureau in 2003)
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Solstice
A solstice is an event occurring when the Sun
Sun
appears to reach its most northerly or southerly excursion relative to the celestial equator on the celestial sphere. Two solstices occur annually, around June 21 and December 21. The seasons of the year are directly connected to both the solstices and the equinoxes. The term solstice can also be used in a broader sense, as the day when this occurs. The day of the solstice in either hemisphere has either the most sunlight of the year (summer solstice) or the least sunlight of the year (winter solstice) for any place other than the Equator. Alternative terms, with no ambiguity as to which hemisphere is the context, are June solstice and December solstice, referring to the months of year in which they take place. [2] At latitudes outside the tropics, the summer solstice marks the day when the Sun
Sun
appears to reach its highest point in the sky
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Equinox
An equinox is commonly regarded as the moment the plane of Earth's equator passes through the center of the Sun's disk,[2] which occurs twice each year, around 20 March and 22-23 September. In other words, it is the point in which the center of the visible sun is directly over the equator
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Cross-quarter Days
The Wheel of the Year is an annual cycle of seasonal festivals, observed by many modern Pagans. It consists of either four or eight festivals: either the solstices and equinoxes, known as the "quarter days", or the four midpoints between, known as the "cross quarter days"; syncretic traditions like Wicca often celebrate all eight festivals. The festivals celebrated by differing sects of modern Paganism can vary considerably in name and date
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William F Romain
William Francis Romain (born 1948) is an American archaeologist, archaeoastronomer, and author. William Romain received his Ph.D. in archaeology from the University of Leicester and M.A. degree in anthropology from Kent State University. He is Director of The Ancient Earthworks Project.[1] He specializes in the study of ancient religions, cognitive archaeology, and archaeoastronomy.[2] William Romain pioneered the use of LIDAR technology for the analyses of ancient earthworks - most notably those of the Eastern Woodlands.[3][4] In 2011 Romain led a team of archaeologists (collectively known as The Serpent Mound Project) in an investigation of Serpent Mound, in Adams County, Ohio.[5] This was the first major investigation of the effigy in more than one hundred years and included Geoprobe coring, hand coring, limited excavation, ground-penetrating radar, and electric resistivity analysis
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Mica
The mica group of sheet silicate (phyllosilicate) minerals includes several closely related materials having nearly perfect basal cleavage. All are monoclinic, with a tendency towards pseudohexagonal crystals, and are similar in chemical composition
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Copper
Copper
Copper
is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a reddish-orange color. Copper
Copper
is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper
Copper
is one of the few metals that occur in nature in directly usable metallic form (native metals) as opposed to needing extraction from an ore. This led to very early human use, from c. 8000 BC. It was the first metal to be smelted from its ore, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c
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Moon
The Moon
The Moon
is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth, being Earth's only permanent natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest natural satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits (its primary). Following Jupiter's satellite Io, the Moon
Moon
is the second-densest satellite in the Solar System
Solar System
among those whose densities are known. The Moon
The Moon
is thought to have formed about 4.51 billion years ago, not long after Earth
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Silver
Silver
Silver
is a chemical element with symbol Ag (from the Latin
Latin
argentum, derived from the Proto-Indo-European
Proto-Indo-European
h₂erǵ: "shiny" or "white") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form ("native silver"), as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining. Silver
Silver
has long been valued as a precious metal
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Scioto County, Ohio
Scioto County is a county located in the south central region of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 79,499.[3] Its county seat is Portsmouth.[4] The county was founded March 24, 1803 from Adams County and is named for an Indian word referring to deer or deer-hunting.[5] Scioto County comprises the Portsmouth, OH Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Charleston-Huntington-Ashland,WV-OH-KY Combined Statistical Area
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Achondroplastic
Achondroplasia is a genetic disorder that results in dwarfism.[3] In those with the condition, the arms and legs are short, while the torso is typically of normal length.[3] Those affected have an average adult height of 131 centimetres (4 ft 4 in) for males and 123 centimetres (4 ft) for females.[3] Other features include an enlarged head and prominent forehead.[3] Intelligence is generally normal.[3] Achondroplasia is due to a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene.[3] In about 80% of cases this occurs as a new mutation during early development.[3] In the other cases it is inherited from one's parents in an autosomal dominant manner.[3] Those with two affected genes do not typically survive.[3] Diagnosis is generally based on symptoms, but may be supported by genetic testing if uncertain.[4] Treatments may include support groups and growth hormone therapy.[4] Efforts to treat or prevent complications such as obesity, hydrocephalus, obstructive
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